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Women’s Marches Spark Accusations of COVID Hypocrisy From All Directions

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As thousands of women gathered to participate in Women’s March events held throughout the U.S. on Saturday, critics raised questions about the safety of holding the marches at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.



text: Demonstrators march during the #CountonUs March Women's Voter Rally on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. As thousands gathered in the nation's capital and across the U.S., critics questioned whether holding the in-person events was wise at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.


© Paul Morigi/Getty
Demonstrators march during the #CountonUs March Women’s Voter Rally on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. As thousands gathered in the nation’s capital and across the U.S., critics questioned whether holding the in-person events was wise at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.

According to event organizers, more than 425 Women’s March events were expected to be held either in person or virtually on Saturday. Organizers said on the Women’s March Facebook page that the in-person events would be socially distanced.

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Video shared online of the march in Washington, D.C., appeared to show participants packed together as they marched and hoisted signs, many of which called for an end to President Donald Trump’s time in office. The very first Women’s March was held the day after Trump’s inauguration in 2017.

Organizers of Saturday’s flagship event in Washington, D.C., were permitted to have 10,000 participants, according to NPR—far below the hundreds of thousands who participated in the very first march nearly four years ago.

“But then again, there’s a pandemic,” NPR reporter Sarah McCammon said of the crowd size on Twitter.

The event webpage outlined safety precautions from organizers that included a mask requirement, an encouragement to practice social distancing, hand sanitizer provisions and proddings for would-be participants to stay home if they were experiencing possible COVID-19 symptoms. Organizers also distributed masks to participants who needed them and projected social distancing reminders on LED screens in the area.

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“Why no media outrage about the crowd size,” Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican, said as he retweeted a post of the crowd gathered in the nation’s capital. “Or do #COVIDー19 rules only apply when you go to church, college football games, and Trump rallies?”

One Twitter user addressed the crowd size in Washington, D.C., and referenced a recommendation that Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and member of the White House coronavirus task force, made earlier this week about avoiding large family gatherings this Thanksgiving.

“I’d like Dr. Fauci to weigh in on what he thinks about this #WomensMarch2020 event during a pandemic after his canceling Thanksgiving remarks,” @ChuckRichter70 wrote. Another Twitter user wrote, “Corona Virus for Trump Rallies and football games bad actually called super spreaders. #WomensMarch2020 nothing to see move on.”

After local media outlets in Minnesota reported that one Women’s March planned to take place near the state capitol was cancelled after the Minnesota attorney general said organizers