gift

TU’s new touchdown hat a gift from interim athletic director Rick Dickson | TU Sports Extra

Posted on



Zaven

Tulsa linebacker Zaven Collins wears the team’s new touchdown hat along with the turnover chain after an interception return for a touchdown last Friday against USF.




Interim athletic director Rick Dickson is already making an impression with the University of Tulsa football team.

Dickson, who returned to his alma mater last month after the departure of Derrick Gragg to a senior vice president role with the NCAA, recently presented the Hurricane with a gift: a touchdown hat.

The blue fedora with a red feather is worn on the sidelines by a TU player who scores a touchdown, similar to the flashy turnover chain that a defensive player puts on after forcing a turnover.

“It was Rick’s idea all the way,” coach Philip Montgomery said. “He kind of wanted to give something to the players that they could have fun with and that brought his personality with it, too. I think the guys have enjoyed the hat.”

A former TU football player who previously was the Hurricane’s athletic director in the early 1990s, Dickson has been an everyday attendee at the team’s practices. On the first day, he wore a straw Panama hat that somehow sparked the idea of a touchdown hat.

“Our new AD, we call him OG,” said linebacker Zaven Collins, whose pick-six Friday at USF led to him wearing the hat and the chain. “He’s a great guy. … He’s always around, even when it’s cold. He makes it out and supports us, not just on game days.”

Gragg, who played college football at Vanderbilt, also frequently attended practice.

Source Article

women

‘Not Done’ Director on Connecting #MeToo, Time’s Up, Black Lives Matter for ‘Women Remaking America’ Documentary

Posted on

#MeToo. #TimesUp. Now #NotDone?

A new documentary from first-time director Sara Wolitzky, titled “Not Done: Women Remaking America,” looks back on the last few years of advancements in the women’s movement. Premiering on Oct. 27 on PBS, just days ahead of the 2020 presidential election, the project feels both perfectly timed and also like it may just be the start of another wave of the movement.

“We’re living through another of these major chapters of feminist organizing and people being back in the streets and huge shifts in public consciousness,” Wolitzky tells Variety. “It felt like a good moment, but in some ways we can only scratch the surface. There’s always a lot more, both in terms of what happens next but also even in terms of looking more closely at the stuff that’s just happened. There are definitely pieces [within ‘Not Done’] that we could have done a whole film on.”

“Not Done” is the first film release from Verizon’s Future Fund, a multi-million dollar company commitment to supporting new and emerging female talent in entertainment and tech. It explores the outcry of feminism over the last four years, from the 2016 election through the women’s marches that in many places turns into marches for equality and inclusion among multiple disenfranchised and underrepresented groups, to Alyssa Milano making Tarana Burke’s #MeToo movement go viral, the importance of Black Lives Matter being started by mothers and the start of Time’s Up. It features original interviews with everyone from African American Policy Forum co-founder and author Kimberlé Crenshaw, Black Lives Matter co-founders Patrisse Cullors and Alicia Garza, producers including Shonda Rhimes and Joey Soloway, activist and journalist Gloria Steinem and Time’s Up co-founder and CEO Tina Tchen.

But as apropos as it may seem, the time of its release was not entirely intentional. Wolitzky tells Variety that she began shooting her first interviews for the project in October 2019, and the plan was to release it in June. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, caused her to pause when she was “about 90% done with filming,” she recalls. But, as she and her team were spinning their wheels in editing, a racial reckoning was taking place in the real world, which added a layer of fresh relevance to the story arc she was creating.

“Black Lives Matter was always a part of the film and our interviews with Patrisse Cullors and Alicia Garza were some of the earliest ones that we did. We saw the founding of Black Lives Matter as being a part of that first wave and foundational moment to this new era of feminist organizing,” says Wolitzy. To “see, come June and the summer, this racial justice reckoning happen — and happen in a way that was in some ways an evolution in the direction of the principles that those women had started it with, wanting to be intersectional in that respect” we wanted to “be responsive to what was happening in the world and make it as timely

women

Bad Hair: ‘Satirical Horror Love Letter’ to Black Women, Says Director

Posted on

Writer and director Justin Simien said his new horror film, “Bad Hair,” is dedicated to the strength of the Black women in his life.

“‘Bad Hair’ is a very weird love letter to Black women and the unparalleled power they possess to endure and persevere,” Simien said in a pre-recorded intro at the Hulu film’s drive-in premiere on Thursday night at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. “It’s my satirical horror love letter. Is that a thing? I guess we’re making it a thing.”

The movie tells the story of a Black woman (Elle Lorraine) forced to pay for a weave in order to continue her career in television and be taken seriously by her boss. Things turn for the worse when her new hair takes on a life of its own, a superstition she always dismissed when her father said he believed in it.

Though the film is comedic in nature, actress Lena Waithe said the root of its plot is much deeper than a few laughs. “It’s an important story,” she said. “It’s a story about the adversity Black women face in the workplace.”

Before guests parked to watch the pic, they drove through the haunted Huluween experience featuring characters from Hulu series and films, including “Helstrom.” Photos were taken in front of a “Bad Hair” background via green screen.

In accordance with safety protocols set up to curb the spread of COVID-19, attendees were required to stay in their cars.

“Bad Hair” premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January. The movie also stars Laverne Cox, Kelly Rowland, Vanessa Williams, Jay Pharoah and Usher.

“Bad Hair” is available now on Hulu.

Source Article

beauty

WWP Beauty Welcomes William Jiang as Its Asia Pacific Managing Director

Posted on

WWP Beauty, a leading provider of cosmetic packaging components, tubes, and full-service turnkey beauty solutions, has hired William Jiang as its Managing Director of Asia Pacific. The Asia market plays a key role in the company’s global expansion, supply chain, and sales strategy. Under William’s leadership, WWP Beauty will be able to strengthen its innovation pipeline as well as provide a more seamless full-service experience to customers worldwide.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201022005782/en/

William Jiang, Asia Pacific Managing Director for WWP Beauty (Photo: Business Wire)

With over two decades of experience in the beauty and manufacturing industry, William has a successful track record of growing businesses and working closely with customer to grow their businesses. He deeply understands manufacturing operations and processes, as well as sales strategies and supply chain management. In previous roles, he worked closely with customers of all sizes to understand their needs, and leverage capabilities to offer them valuable solutions and quality service. At WWP Beauty, William will be a key driver in the company’s global strategy bringing customers globalized efficiencies with local market support, working towards the ultimate goal of being the leading supplier of innovative beauty solutions. William will be opening, operating and managing multiple locations in the Asia Pacific region including WWP Beauty’s existing wholly-owned manufacturing facilities which he will continue to expand across the entire Asia region.

“As we continue to grow our team, we could not be happier to welcome William. He has a very successful history in this industry and we are confident in his abilities to create a flexible supply platform for the company that will allow us to truly be the source for everything beauty,” said Robert Tognetti, COO. “With the efficiencies created by William, WWP Beauty will continue to strengthen its capability to provide best in class service to both indie brands and global brands.”

About WWP Beauty

WWP Beauty is committed to developing future-focused, sustainable solutions for the global beauty industry through close collaboration, exceptional agility, and unparalleled scale. The company’s full-service offering of formula, packaging and accessories, paired with their in-house manufacturing capabilities allow them to stand out as the source for everything beauty. Through a worldwide team of beauty experts that span across North America, Europe and Asia, WWP Beauty offers their customers global support at the local level. To learn more visit our website at www.wwpbeauty.com

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201022005782/en/

Contacts

Christopher Dale
Turchette Agency
(973) 227-8080 ext. 116
cdale@turchette.com

Megan Gunn
WWP Beauty
(973) 805-6500
megan@wwpinc.com

Source Article

women

Sienna Miller says ‘army of women’ would ‘fight’ a director like Alfred Hitchcock in modern Hollywood

Posted on

Sienna Miller reflected on the difference between Old Hollywood and Hollywood today, particularly when it comes to abuse on the set.

Miller, 38, once portrayed Tippi Hedren in the 2012 movie “The Girl,” which was based on the making of the 1963 film “The Birds,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Hedren, 90, claimed she experienced abuse at the hands of Hitchcock under their seven-year contract.

During the Montclair Film Festival, Miller touched on her portrayal of Hedren and abuse in Hollywood.

TIPPI HEDREN ON WORKING WITH ALFRED HITCHCOCK, RESCUING BIG CATS, AND FILMING THE ‘MOST DANGEROUS MOVIE EVER MADE’

Sienna Miller said that an 'army of women' would come for Alfred Hitchcock today.

Sienna Miller said that an ‘army of women’ would come for Alfred Hitchcock today.
(Getty Images)

“With certain directors, there’s an element of control. I tend to respond really positively to nurturing warmth and support, but there are directors who have gotten performances out of me by doing the opposite,” Miller said during a Q&A per IndieWire. 

She added: “Nothing on the level of Hitchcock and Tippi.” 

“That was a really, really traumatizing, appalling experience for her,” the “21 Bridges” actress said. “And not only how he treated her in the making of those films but in the aftermath. He kept her under contract. He wouldn’t release her to work with Godard and Truffaut, etc. who we were all trying to hire her, but just kept her for 10 years under this contract and watched her grow old, without making anything. It was very sadistic.”

HARVEY WEINSTEIN MADE SIENNA MILLER CRY WITH PARTYING LECTURE

Tippi Hedren poses with Buddy, the Raven, between scenes of Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds."

Tippi Hedren poses with Buddy, the Raven, between scenes of Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds.”
(Getty)

Miller added: “Thankfully I think the world has changed enough where, if anybody even attempted that kind of abuse, there is an army of women that would come out and fight it.” 

Hedren told Fox News in 2017, “He kept me under contract and wouldn’t let me work. It was just one of those Hollywood nightmares … It was just so unnecessary. That’s what was so awful about this. It was just … just a sad situation. Just sad.”

During the recent Q&A, Miller stated that she feels “very fortunate” to be making movies today, versus when actors “really belonged to the studio that you were assigned to and, essentially, to the director.”

Sienna Miller is greatful to be an actress in modern Hollywood

Sienna Miller is greatful to be an actress in modern Hollywood
(AP)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The “American Sniper” star then opened up about her experience with power hungry directors, stating that while she never experienced sexual abuse, “There was inappropriate behavior.”

“I do remember when I was younger going for auditions. You’d do the tape, and they’d seem disinterested, but then they’d make you turn around and film your whole body, and zoom in… people are a lot more careful,” Miller concluded.

Source Article

women

Sienna Miller Says an ‘Army of Women’ Would Come for a Director Like Hitchcock Today

Posted on

Click here to read the full article.

Sienna Miller got a taste of what the Hitchcock Blonde experience might’ve been like when she portrayed Tippi Hedren in 2012’s HBO movie “The Girl” about the making of “The Birds” and the filmmaker’s torturous methods. Alfred Hitchcock notoriously held control over Hedren’s career with a seven-year contract, and reportedly made her life a living hell on the set of “The Birds” and “Marnie,” the only two films they did together after Hitch plucked her out of a Sego commercial.

While Miller said she’s never experienced any abuse in her career firsthand, she still found resonance in the role, as she said while reflecting on Hedren’s destructive relationship with her director, and how Hedren’s story might play out today, during a recent Montclair Film Festival Q&A.

“With certain directors, there’s an element of control. I tend to respond really positively to nurturing warmth and support, but there are directors who have gotten performances out of me by doing the opposite,” said Miller, who was attending the festival virtually to support her new movie “Wander Darkly.” “Nothing on the level of Hitchcock and Tippi. That was a really, really traumatizing, appalling experience for her. And not only how he treated her in the making of those films but in the aftermath. He kept her under contract. He wouldn’t release her to work with Godard and Truffaut, etc. who we were all trying to hire her, but just kept her for 10 years under this contract and watched her grow old, without making anything. It was very sadistic.”

Miller added, “Thankfully I think the world has changed enough where if anybody even attempted that kind of abuse, there is an army of women that would come out and fight it. And I feel very fortunate to be working in these times, because I think that story is not uncommon of that era. You really belonged to the studio that you were assigned to and, essentially, to the director.”

Miller said that she’s never been confronted with any “sexual abuse” in her career. “But there was yelling, and there was inappropriate behavior. I do remember when I was younger going for auditions. You’d do do the tape, and they’d seem disinterested, but then they’d make you turn around and film your whole body, and zoom in… people are a lot more careful,” she said.

“Wander Darkly” will be released by Lionsgate in December in select theaters and on VOD, and it’s currently playing virtual festivals, including Montclair and AFI Fest.

Source Article