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Women’s World Cup holders NZ top seeds for 2021 draw

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WELLINGTON (Reuters) – New Zealand, England and Canada were confirmed as the top three seeds for the women’s 2021 Rugby World Cup after the game’s governing body opted to use rankings from the start of the year with southern hemisphere teams unable to play due to COVID-19 curbs.



Bill Beaumont wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Rugby World Cup - World Rugby and the Japan Rugby 2019 Organising Committee hold news conference ahead of knockout matches


© Reuters/MATTHEW CHILDS
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union – Rugby World Cup – World Rugby and the Japan Rugby 2019 Organising Committee hold news conference ahead of knockout matches

The draw for the tournament will be conducted in Auckland on Nov. 20. The event, to run from Sept. 18 to Oct. 16 next year, will take place in New Zealand, the first time it has been hosted in the southern hemisphere.

Champions New Zealand, 2017 runners-up England and Canada occupy the top tier of seeds. France, who finished third in 2017, Australia and the United States are the second tier.

Wales, who were the seventh team to qualify automatically based on their 2017 finish, South Africa and the top-ranked European qualifier make up the third tier of seeds.

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Oceania winners Fiji, a team from Asia and the team that wins the final qualifying tournament are in tier four.

World Rugby said in a statement the seedings were based on rankings as of Jan. 1, 2020 as restrictions imposed to halt the spread of the novel coronavirus meant none of the southern hemisphere teams were able to play this year.

“We are in unusual and unique times with the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic,” World Rugby Chairman Bill Beaumont said.

“However, working in full partnership with New Zealand Rugby and local and national authorities, we are committed to a spectacular Rugby World Cup 2021.”

Matches will be held in Auckland and Whangarei, with the final to be held at Eden Park, which hosted the 1987 and 2011 men’s World Cup finals.

(Reporting by Greg Stutchbury; Editing by Peter Rutherford)

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New York bars wedding of a Brooklyn rabbi’s grandson expected to draw 10,000 people | Live Well

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Orthodox Jewish groups filed lawsuits to block the executive order, but a federal judge ruled against one Orthodox organization which sought a temporary restraining order to block the new restrictions. The group, Agudath Israel of America, filed an appeal to the ruling on Monday.

Members of New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community have held protests in Brooklyn in response to the new coronavirus-related restrictions.

At a press conference on Sunday, Cuomo said a big wedding “isn’t on the top list of concerns.”

“You can’t have a wedding now with thousands of people,” said Cuomo. “There is no safe way to do that. We know that. We know that a party with a hundred people has generated issues.”

“My suggestion: Have a small wedding this year. Next year, have a big wedding. Invite me, I’ll come.”

The synagogue released a statement on Sunday saying that “the wedding will not be held as planned” and will only be attended by “close family members.” Others hoping to participate in the wedding can do so virtually, according to a statement.

“The unwarranted attacks on this event, originated by those besmirching the community, are detached from the facts,” said Chaim Jacobowitz, the synagogue’s secretary, in the statement. “It’s sad that nobody verified our plans before attacking us.”

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New York bars wedding of a Brooklyn rabbi’s grandson expected to draw 10,000 people | Health

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Orthodox Jewish groups filed lawsuits to block the executive order, but a federal judge ruled against one Orthodox organization which sought a temporary restraining order to block the new restrictions. The group, Agudath Israel of America, filed an appeal to the ruling on Monday.

Members of New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community have held protests in Brooklyn in response to the new coronavirus-related restrictions.

At a press conference on Sunday, Cuomo said a big wedding “isn’t on the top list of concerns.”

“You can’t have a wedding now with thousands of people,” said Cuomo. “There is no safe way to do that. We know that. We know that a party with a hundred people has generated issues.”

“My suggestion: Have a small wedding this year. Next year, have a big wedding. Invite me, I’ll come.”

The synagogue released a statement on Sunday saying that “the wedding will not be held as planned” and will only be attended by “close family members.” Others hoping to participate in the wedding can do so virtually, according to a statement.

“The unwarranted attacks on this event, originated by those besmirching the community, are detached from the facts,” said Chaim Jacobowitz, the synagogue’s secretary, in the statement. “It’s sad that nobody verified our plans before attacking us.”

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March To The Polls, Women’s March Draw Crowds

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Here are some of the share-worthy stories from Virginia and DC Patches to talk about tonight:

Loudoun NAACP Leads March Against Voter Suppression In Leesburg

Loudoun NAACP President Michelle Thomas, together with dozens of young people, led a march through Leesburg Saturday afternoon urging residents to vote in the Nov. 3 election. The march finished at the Loudoun County elections office, which was open Saturday for early in-person absentee voting.

Herndon Women’s March Focuses On Equity, Voting

A crowd of marchers demonstrated peacefully Saturday afternoon as part of the Herndon Women’s March. After marching through town, the participants returned to Town Hall to listen to a slate of speakers discuss women’s rights, social justice, and equity.

Statue, Street Name To Honor Earl Lloyd, First Black NBA Player

The late Earl Lloyd, an Alexandria resident who became the first African American person in history to play in an NBA game, will be honored by his home city in several ways. On Saturday, Alexandria City Council approved an honorary street name called “Earl Lloyd Way.” In addition, a statue of Lloyd will be located at the Charles Houston Recreation Center, where a Parker-Gray Memorial Brick Walkway dedication is also planned.

DC Residents Must Self-Quarantine After Visiting These 39 States

D.C. Department of Health on Monday updated its list of states deemed to be at high risk for transmitting the new coronavirus. People traveling from these 39 states to D.C. will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days when they arrive.

Body Of Paddle Boarder Recovered From Ashburn Reservoir: Police

The body of a Fairfax County woman was recovered Sunday morning from Beaverdam Reservoir in Ashburn, according to the sheriff’s office. The woman, Leilani Funaki, 38, was paddle-boarding in the reservoir when she was reported missing Thursday night.

Fall Foliage: Near Peak Colors In Alleghanies, SW Virginia

Near-peak colors have reached leaves in half of the trees in the higher elevations of southwest Virginia and the Alleghanies in the past week if you want to venture out to view fall foliage colors.

Virginia Coronavirus Patients On Ventilators Reach New Low

The number of coronavirus patients on ventilators is at a new low, according to data tracked by the Virginia Department of Health.

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This article originally appeared on the Annandale Patch

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New York bars wedding of a Brooklyn rabbi’s grandson expected to draw 10,000 people

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A wedding at a Hasidic Jewish synagogue that was expected to draw up to 10,000 people has been barred by a New York state order, according to officials.



a tall glass building: A big crowd was expected at a wedding at a Brooklyn synagogue.


© Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images
A big crowd was expected at a wedding at a Brooklyn synagogue.

A grandson of the grand rebbe (rabbi) of Congregation Yetev Lev D’Satmar in Brooklyn planned to get married Monday, according to a statement attributed to the synagogue which CNN received from the Satmar Wedding Committee.

After an investigation into the planned wedding, New York State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker on Friday signed a section 16 order barring the event, Beth Garvey, special counsel to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, confirmed at a press conference on Saturday.

“It was outside the target red, or orange or yellow cluster zone, but the information that our investigation revealed was that upwards of 10,000 individuals … planned to attend,” Garvey said.

Cuomo issued an executive order earlier this month that limits gatherings in houses of worship in New York City neighborhoods that have seen spikes in Covid-19 cases, including several with large Orthodox Jewish communities.

The order limits gatherings to no more than 25% capacity or a maximum of 10 people in red zone clusters, while those in the orange zone can operate at up to 33% capacity with a maximum of 25 people. Houses of worship in a yellow zone may operate at up to 50% capacity.

Orthodox Jewish groups filed lawsuits to block the executive order, but a federal judge ruled against one Orthodox organization which sought a temporary restraining order to block the new restrictions. The group, Agudath Israel of America, filed an appeal to the ruling on Monday.

Members of New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community have held protests in Brooklyn in response to the new coronavirus-related restrictions.

At a press conference on Sunday, Cuomo said a big wedding “isn’t on the top list of concerns.”

“You can’t have a wedding now with thousands of people,” said Cuomo. “There is no safe way to do that. We know that. We know that a party with a hundred people has generated issues.”

“My suggestion: Have a small wedding this year. Next year, have a big wedding. Invite me, I’ll come.”

The synagogue released a statement on Sunday saying that “the wedding will not be held as planned” and will only be attended by “close family members.” Others hoping to participate in the wedding can do so virtually, according to a statement.

“The unwarranted attacks on this event, originated by those besmirching the community, are detached from the facts,” said Chaim Jacobowitz, the synagogue’s secretary, in the statement. “It’s sad that nobody verified our plans before attacking us.”

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that the state and the city worked together to raise concerns about the wedding.

“The good news is that the decision was made by the folks who are putting together the wedding to have that much smaller service and do the rest

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New York shuts down a wedding amid fears it would draw 10,000 people.

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A wedding with up 10,000 guests? In Brooklyn, near a coronavirus hot spot?

No, New York state officials said.

The officials have taken extraordinary steps to shut down the ultra-Orthodox wedding planned for Monday, with the state health commissioner personally intervening to have sheriff’s deputies deliver an order to the Hasidic synagogue where it would take place.

The order, delivered on Friday, warned that the synagogue must follow health protocols, including limiting gatherings to fewer than 50 people.

On Sunday, the synagogue, the Congregation Yetev Lev D’Satmar, accused state officials of “unwarranted attacks” on the wedding, at which a grandson of Zalman Leib Teitelbaum, the synagogue’s rabbi, is to be married. The congregation said that the ceremony and meal would have been restricted to “close family members,” and that members of the public would have been invited to participate only “for a short period of time.”

The wedding will continue, the synagogue said, but will be limited to a smaller group of family members.

“It’s sad that nobody verified our plans before attacking us,” Chaim Jacobowitz, the congregation’s secretary, said in a statement.

The episode highlighted the brewing tensions between state and local officials the Hasidic community as state health officials try to control surging coronavirus cases in some neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens and in counties north of New York City.

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo said Sunday that a large wedding was too risky and could have resulted in a so-called superspreader event. State officials said that they determined the wedding, scheduled to take place in Williamsburg, could have had up to 10,000 people in attendance.

“My suggestion: Have a small wedding this year,” Mr. Cuomo said at a news conference on Sunday. “Next year, have a big wedding. Invite me, and I’ll come.”

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Anti-Trump Women’s Rallies Draw Thousands Across US

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Thousands took to the streets across the United States for women’s marches on Saturday, many wearing pink protest hats while issuing fervent calls against President Donald Trump and his conservative Supreme Court pick.

The rallies ahead of the November 3 election were inspired by the first Women’s March in Washington, a huge anti-Trump rally held a day after his 2017 inauguration.

Most marchers in Washington wore protective masks for the women's rally against Trump Most marchers in Washington wore protective masks for the women’s rally against Trump Photo: AFP / Daniel SLIM

In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, the demonstrations Saturday were considerably smaller, though protesters still turned out in cities across the country, according to organizers.

More than 100,000 people took part in some 430 marches in locations from New York to Los Angeles and Chicago to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, organizers said.

Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington's women's march Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington’s women’s march Photo: AFPTV / Solange UWIMANA

They urged people worried about in-person participation to join in a “socially distant text-banking telethon” aimed at sending five million messages encouraging people to vote.

Marchers also paid tribute to late Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — an icon for women and progressives — while protesting Trump’s choice of conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace her.

Some protesters came to the march in Washington dressed as characters from the dystopian novel and television series "The Handmaid's Tale," who are forced to bear children Some protesters came to the march in Washington dressed as characters from the dystopian novel and television series “The Handmaid’s Tale,” who are forced to bear children Photo: GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / TASOS KATOPODIS

Barrett has made no secret of her strong Catholic beliefs, raising concerns that a Supreme Court dominated by conservatives could overturn abortion rights if she is confirmed by the Senate.

Trump and his fellow Republicans are seeking to fast-track her nomination before the election, a process that began this week and which has drawn sharp controversy.

The protest route in Washington started near the White House before heading to the US Capitol and the Supreme Court building, where a smaller “I’m With Her” counterprotest — in Barrett’s favor — was held.

Demonstrators gather for the Women's March in New York on October 17, 2020 Demonstrators gather for the Women’s March in New York on October 17, 2020 Photo: AFP / Kena Betancur

Most marchers in Washington wore face masks to stem the spread of Covid-19, with some dressed as Ginsburg in black robes with white lace collars, and many wore the knitted pink hats made famous by the original march.

A number of protesters dressed in red robes and white bonnets, portraying characters forced to bear children in the dystopian novel and television series “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

Signs and banners underscored the broader anti-Trump message: “Trump/Pence: Out Now,” read one, while others simply said, “Dump Trump.”

In New York, around 300 people gathered at Manhattan’s Washington Square, many with pink hats and signs supporting Trump’s Democratic opponent Joe Biden or honoring Ginsburg. It was one of five separate marches in the city.

“It’s really important to be here and try to encourage people to vote out Trump and his misogynistic policies, especially now, with Covid, when a lot of people are isolated,” said Yvonne Shackleton,