women

Women Voters 50-Plus Could Decide the 2020 Election

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“Women have, for a long time, been more worried about retirement security, in part because they’re more worried about being on their own,” says Celinda Lake, a veteran Democratic pollster. In the U.S., on average, women live five years longer than men, according to life expectancy data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Social Security is “of exceptional importance,” says Jean Nofles, 78, of Denver. “It’s a right. It’s something that we have earned, and I hate to see it being played with. Too many older people have that as their sole source of income.”

According to an October report by the New School’s Retirement Equity Lab, older women have faced higher rates of job loss than older men since the beginning of the pandemic. During each month between April and September, the report states, women were 38 percent more likely than men to become unemployed.

The coronavirus has added an extra layer of concern for older women already worried about being able to afford to retire, LeaMond said at a forum on older voters that AARP sponsored this week with The Hill newspaper. Women, she said, are not only “being paid less in jobs than their male counterparts” but also are often the ones in the family who take more time out of the workforce to care for children or parents.

AARP’s polls reflect women’s economic concerns. When it comes to fears about Social Security, women are more worried than men about benefits being cut: 78 percent versus 64 percent in Arizona; 80 percent versus 61 percent in Wisconsin. Women are also more anxious about being able to afford to retire. In Michigan, 84 percent of women reported being worried, compared with 60 percent of men; in Wisconsin, it’s 63 percent of women versus 50 percent of men.

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Black women are the backbone of the Democratic Party. And they feel the heavy burden of this election.

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Wendy Caldwell-Liddell is in a race against time, all the time.



a smiling man and woman posing for a photo


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She is racing to wrap up her job as a grant-writing consultant. She is racing to get her 10-year-old son logged in to start remote learning at home since a case of coronavirus shut down his school. She is racing to drive her two-year-old daughter over to grandma’s house for daycare.



a man smiling for the camera: To Detroiters who don't like President Trump but didn't vote in 2016, 63-year old Detroit native Markita Blanchard says, "If you did not vote, you did vote for him."


© Jessica Small/CNN
To Detroiters who don’t like President Trump but didn’t vote in 2016, 63-year old Detroit native Markita Blanchard says, “If you did not vote, you did vote for him.”

But now on top of that, three times a week, 29-year-old Caldwell-Liddell is racing to get Detroit voters, especially the black community, to, in her words, “wake up.”

Four years after Donald Trump became the first Republican to win Michigan since 1988, Caldwell-Liddell is working as a one-woman canvassing machine in downtown Detroit to prevent it from happening again, fighting against what she says is an apathy within the community toward politics.



a man smiling for the camera: Detroit native Amber Davis sat out the 2016 election. This year she says, "I don't like Biden, but I'm voting for Biden."


© Jessica Small/CNN
Detroit native Amber Davis sat out the 2016 election. This year she says, “I don’t like Biden, but I’m voting for Biden.”

Trump’s Michigan victory was one of the biggest surprises of 2016. He won the state by just 10,704 votes. Wayne County, which includes Detroit, the largest Black-majority city in the country, was critical to that result. Hillary Clinton still won the county by a large margin — but she received about 76,000 fewer votes than President Barack Obama did in 2012.

Visit CNN’s Election Center for full coverage of the 2020 race.

While Caldwell-Liddell is motivated and focused on preventing Trump’s re-election, she also says, “the Democratic Party has not done a good job at all in taking care of communities like ours.” And it’s she clear she struggles with that burden.

“(Democrats) take us for granted because they know that Black women are going to help them get the big wins they need, where it matters. But they also know that they can give us the bare minimum, knowing that we aren’t going to choose the other side,” she said. “

“It says we still got a long way to go when the backbone of the country is the most neglected piece of the country,” she said.

She isn’t coordinating with any campaign, but she is pounding the pavement at bus stops and outside convenience stores to try to make sure Detroiters are registered to vote and are going to vote. Many of them are disillusioned by the systemic racism they see within their city, the President’s response to the coronavirus pandemic that has hit minority communities hardest and the economic inequality that has persisted for decades in Detroit and is only made worse by the pandemic.



a man looking at the camera: 29-year-old Wendy Caldwell-Liddell founded Mobilize Detroit to try and reach those who think their vote doesn't matter. "I wish the people here knew of their power. I wish people were more aware of the power that they have," she says.


© Jessica Small/CNN
29-year-old Wendy Caldwell-Liddell founded Mobilize Detroit to try and reach those who think their vote doesn’t matter. “I wish the people here knew of their power. I wish people were more aware of

women

Central Florida women could sway 2020 election. Meet 8 of them.

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As women go to the polls on the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment giving them the right to vote, their political might could be on display come Election Night.

And candidates know it.

At a campaign stop in Ocala last week, President Donald Trump touted women’s support.

“Do they like Donald Trump? Yeah, they like Donald Trump,” he said. “You know why? Because they want safety and security. And they don’t want low-income housing built next to their beautiful suburban dream.”

But nearly every national poll shows women favor Vice President Joe Biden by a double-digit margin over Trump.

In Florida, likely the most critical swing state determining who will control the White House, women outnumber men statewide and in Orange, Seminole, Lake and Osceola counties.

A poll of Florida women by the University of North Florida this month found women going for Biden, with 56% statewide saying they planned to back the former vice president, with 39% breaking for Trump.

As campaigns hit their apex and early voting is already under way, the Orlando Sentinel spoke with eight women representing a range of political beliefs, socioeconomic backgrounds and ethnicities from across the I-4 Corridor, providing a snapshot of the key region’s viewpoints.

Briana Ross

For Briana Ross, 18 and voting in a general election for the first time this fall, the choice is clear.

“I am voting for Joe Biden,” she said.

Ross, who attends the University of Central Florida and lives in Kissimmee, said she’s paid more attention to current events and politics during the past couple of years.

“As a voter, being a minority, a woman and an African American, there’s a lot of different factors that come into how I vote,” she said. “I want to pick somebody who will put everybody first, but will not overlook minorities – that is the thing that President Trump does.”

She was disappointed by Trump’s response to the death of George Floyd at the hands of a police officer and the Black Lives Matter protests that followed.

“It seemed like he had no remorse for what happened to George Floyd, and that’s something that really impacted my point of view,” Ross said.

People of color, she said, pay taxes and deserve “equal and fair treatment” under the law.

She also worries about the lasting effects of the coronavirus pandemic and said Trump is unfairly blaming China for the spread of the disease in the United States.

“I believe our country should have closed sooner,” Ross said. “We should have taken more precautions earlier. We should’ve started social distancing earlier, wearing masks.”

Trump, she said, acts like “wearing masks is not such a big deal, when it is.”

“It protects us and the people around us,” she added.

While Ross said she appreciates Kamala Harris’ historic nomination as the first woman of color running on a major party ticket, she said she’s concerned about Harris’ track record as a prosecutor. The vice presidential candidate had a reputation

women

Election 2020 Today: Suburban women revolt, COVID aid delay

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Here’s what’s happening Monday in Election 2020, 15 days until Election Day:

HOW TO VOTE: AP’s state-by-state interactive has details on how to vote in this election.

TODAY’S TOP STORIES:

SUBURBAN WOMEN LEAD TRUMP REVOLT: For many suburban women, the past four years have marked a political awakening that has powered women’s marches, the #MeToo movement and the victories of record numbers of female candidates. That energy has helped create the widest gender gap in the political divide in recent history. And it has started to show up in early voting as women are casting their ballots earlier than men.

TRUMP, BIDEN GO ON OFFENSE: President Donald Trump and his Democratic rival Joe Biden have been on offense, with each campaigning in states they’re trying to flip during the Nov. 3 election. Trump began Sunday in Nevada, making a rare visit to church before an evening rally in Carson City and Biden attended Mass in Delaware before flying to North Carolina.

COVID RELIEF DELAY: New virus relief will have to wait until after the November election. Congress is past the point at which it can deliver more coronavirus aid soon, with differences between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Republicans and Trump proving insurmountable. Trump’s Republican allies are reconvening the Senate this week to vote on a virus proposal, but it’s a bill that failed once before, and that Trump himself now derides as too puny.

2016 SEQUEL?: The president’s attempts to recycle attacks he used on Hillary Clinton have so far failed to effectively damage Biden. And Trump has found himself dwelling more and more in the conservative media echo chamber, talking to an increasingly smaller portion of the electorate. Fueled by personal grievance, the president has tried to amplify stories that diehard Fox News viewers know by heart but have not broken through to a broader public consumed with the sole issue that has defined the campaign, how the president has managed the pandemic.

ICYMI:

Black officers break from unions over Trump endorsements

Most US clergy avoid hellfire threats over abortion politics

Is Facebook really ready for the 2020 election?

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Baltimore Women’s March pushes message of ‘dissent’ ahead of presidential election

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In the final days of a historic election season, young women linked arms Saturday with their mothers and matriarchs for the 2020 Women’s March through downtown Baltimore.



a couple of people that are standing in front of a sign: Kori Christian, left, and Arrion carry a sign together outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Kori Christian, left, and Arrion carry a sign together outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

About 200 people gathered outside the federal courthouse in the 100 block of W. Lombard St. for the event, which has been held annually for about three years. Conceived during the presidency of Republican Donald J. Trump, the progressive grassroots movement has transitioned its battle cry of “resist” in 2017 to “dissent” in 2020 — emphasizing the role of women voters in the Nov. 3 election.



a group of people holding a sign posing for the camera: Morgan Stankiewicz and Karla Rivas hold signs and listen to the speakers outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Morgan Stankiewicz and Karla Rivas hold signs and listen to the speakers outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

Organizers of the Baltimore event included representatives of Baltimore Women United, NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland and Planned Parenthood.

Women United co-chair Odette Ramos said organizers had three messages for the community Saturday: make a plan to vote, tell U.S. senators to delay any confirmations to the U.S. Supreme Court until after the January presidential inauguration, and volunteer to place phone calls to swing states leading up to the general election.



a man holding a microphone: Giuliana Valencia-Banks, of Baltimore Women United, speaks to the crowd outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Giuliana Valencia-Banks, of Baltimore Women United, speaks to the crowd outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

Other women’s marches were held Saturday in dozens of U.S. cities, including Washington, New York and San Francisco.

The Baltimore event attracted dozens of women spanning multiple generations, some of who said they marched for their mothers or daughters. Some wore pink, knit hats and held homemade signs stating “Make America better” and “Not voting is not a protest, it’s surrender.”

Ramos wore a black mask with a white fringe — an homage to the signature lace collars worn by the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — that she said her mother made for her.

Young women, in particular, represented a significant portion of those in attendance.

Elizabeth Polydefkis spent her 18th birthday Saturday marching alongside her mom to City Hall. The act of protest was “empowering,” she said.

“I’m scared for our democracy with Trump,” Polydefkis said. “Women have worked really hard for their rights. I’ve seen a lot of that work eroded in the past four years.”



a person sitting on a bench reading a book: A woman with a sign sits and listens to the speakers. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
A woman with a sign sits and listens to the speakers. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

As the trail of activists wound through downtown, drivers honked horns in support. One

women

Two Women Vie to Lead New Zealand as Polls Open in General Election | World News

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WELLINGTON (Reuters) – New Zealanders went to the polls on Saturday in a general election that could see Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern strengthen her left-of-centre hold on government or a challenge from conservatives led by Judith Collins.

Labour Party leader Ardern, 40, and National Party chief Collins, 61, are the faces of the election to form the country’s 53rd parliament, a pandemic-focused referendum on Ardern’s three-year term.

Doors to the polling booths opened at 9 a.m. (2000 GMT on Friday), though a record number of voters had already cast their ballots in advance.

Restrictions are in place on what news media can report about the race until polls close at 7 p.m. (0600 GMT), after which the Electoral Commission is expected to begin releasing preliminary results.

More than 1.7 million ballots had already been cast as of Friday, accounting for almost half of the about 3.5 million New Zealanders on the electoral rolls.

Special votes, including ballots from New Zealanders overseas and those who vote outside their home constituencies, will only be released on Nov. 6.

New Zealanders are also voting on referendums to legalise euthanasia and recreational marijuana. The latter vote could make New Zealand only the third country in the world to allow the adult use and sale cannabis nationwide, after Uruguay and Canada.

Results of the referendums be announced on Oct. 30.

New Zealand switched to a mixed member proportional system in 1996 in which a party or coalition needs 61 of Parliament’s 120 seats – usually about 48% of the vote – to form a government.

This means minor parties often play an influential role in determining which major party governs.

(Reporting by Praveen Menon; Editing by William Mallard)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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The election won’t change US fashion’s retreat from China

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a group of people in a room: Laborers work on garments for export at the production line of a garment factory in Shanghai


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Laborers work on garments for export at the production line of a garment factory in Shanghai

Fashion companies were not happy when US president Donald Trump started his trade war with China. The additional tariffs on apparel from China raised costs on items coming into the US, speeding an ongoing push to diversify production to other parts of Asia and beyond.

But if corporations think Joe Biden winning the US presidency in November will reverse the situation, they’re mistaken, experts said at a virtual conference on Oct. 14 held by fashion trade outlet Sourcing Journal. Both parties see tariffs as a way to put pressure on China, and that pressure is increasing as the US scrutinizes China’s repression of its Uighur minority.

“Democrats are still going to be looking at tariffs as a policy,” said Stephen Lamar, CEO of the American Apparel & Footwear Association, an industry trade group representing more than 1,000 brands. “The big difference between them and Republicans going forward, whether it’s the Congress or if we a see a change in the administration, is how they justify the use of the [tariffs].” He said Democrats might wield them differently, working in conjunction with allies for instance, or use them to address different matters, such as environmental or human rights issues.

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“It’s more of the same for a while,” said Vincent Iacopella, who deals with trade issues as executive vice president of the large freight services firm Alba Wheels Up. He doesn’t foresee Biden immediately reversing Trump’s tariffs if he wins and noted Democrats also object to China’s behavior in cases such as stealing intellectual property, the issue Trump singled out as the reason for his tariffs. Based on his discussions, Iacopella believes officials might consider a process allowing companies to apply for exclusions, but even that would take time.

The White House announced a 25% tariff on about 1,300 goods in April 2018, later expanding the list and adding a 10% tariff on more items. Along the way China retaliated with its own duties on US products. In Dec. 2019, the two sides reached a “Phase 1” deal that saw the US reduce some tariffs and keep others, while China agreed to buy more American products and services. Though progress has stalled, the two sides say the deal is moving forward.

While many top Democrats initially opposed the tariffs, they’ve also called for a hard stance on China. Both Lamar and Ron Sorini—principal at the firm Sorini, Samet & Associates and manager of its business development, consulting, and lobbying practice—said Democrats see tariffs as a way to show they’re being tough. Sorini thinks Democrats could even escalate the trade war over China’s treatment of Uighurs.

The country has engaged in a campaign increasingly likened to genocide against the predominately Muslim ethnic minority in the Xinjiang region, claiming it is cracking down on extremism. Uighurs are subject to forced labor, including in the region’s cotton fields, which produce around 80% of

women

Women’s March takes to the streets, and Zoom, ahead of presidential election

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When the first Women’s March descended upon Washington’s National Mall in January 2017, the day after President Trump’s inauguration, it was soon estimated to have been the largest single-day protest in U.S. history, drawing 4-5 million participants across the country. 

Despite annual marches taking place in cities across the country every year since, attendance has gradually dwindled, and a number of internal controversies rocked the women-led organization. But, with a historic presidential election at America’s doorstep and a polarizing Senate vote for Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett happening next week, Women’s March has announced #CountOnUs — a series of local marches and actions taking place on Saturday, Oct. 17. 

While the exact format of each local action will differ, Women’s March has said in a statement that they are all being organized with one driving goal in mind: to mobilize women’s vote for the Nov. 3 election, calling Oct. 17 a “galvanizing moment heading into an election where everything is on the line.”

“The power of women across the country is evident in this election. Women are going to defeat Donald Trump, decide who controls the House and the Senate, and prove ourselves as the most powerful electorate out there,” says Women’s March Executive Director Rachel O’Leary Carmona. “Women are fired up and this will be on full display this Saturday as thousands of women come together across the country to prove we are willing to stand up for our futures, and that we are a force Donald Trump just can’t defeat.”

Not everyone is happy about the upcoming Women’s March events, though, as critics say that the movement’s lack of support for Coney Barrett rings hypocritical in nature. A counter rally called “I’m With Her” is scheduled for the same day and plans to meet in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building, saying on their website that the Women’s March has “gone too far,” and that “we must come together to champion women, not tear them down.”

How to participate 

“#CountOnUs is just a few days away,” Women’s March wrote on Instagram. “On Saturday, join us in D.C. or at one of over 350 socially distanced and virtual marches across the country. We will rise up as women, united across our differences, to shift our future and demand a democracy that works for all of us.”

For those who would like to attend but are unable to do so in person, many of Saturday’s actions will be taking place virtually, like Women’s March Chicago, which has announced it will host a predominantly virtual event dubbed “Zoom to the Polls.”

“We’re going to work to get people out to vote, because this election is the one we must do,” said Jaquie Algee, Women’s March Chicago board president, at an online news conference Wednesday. “We’ve got to vote in this election.”


 

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