general

Las Vegas Style Cover Bands Rock Industry Standards

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Across the road from a cola bottle made of lights, I sat with a little darlin’ who captured my attention several years before. She was made for me lovely, bodacious as they come, and ready to rock the night away – in my dreams. In reality, we’d crossed 7 decades a few days earlier and held hands as we slowly moved our way through the ear-piercing sound of a Las Vegas night. One last vacation with my baby? I had begged for it.

My heart danced.

You might believe loud music, Las Vegas Cover Bands, and the brilliant lights of the Sunset Strip are made for youth, but I’m telling you, this boomer is rockin’ the socks off his darlin’ with every single dance step. I love me some Las Vegas dancing. And I’d begged for this trip.

As we strolled the strip, hand in hand, she promised me forever. I promised her my heart. Either way, we were winners. Lovers in the city that never goes to sleep. Partners in life. I held her hand, she held my heart.

Tribute Cover Bands.

Walking down the strip we found our forever. She stepped to the beat, missing most of them, but making sure she hit the ones that mattered, taking my heart along. A tribute to the days of yesterday, our focus on tomorrow. I would remember all the days of my life… I would hold onto this moment every day of my life. She played the tribute in my final hours, and I endured.

Our Limo Awaits.

As the lights come on in Vegas, the sun begins to set. But you’d never know there’s no sun high above you, unless you look up. The lights on the strip are bright. And at my age, looking up makes me dizzy. I tend to try to see past my belly to the place I intend to place my foot next, unless I’m dancing. Then, my darlin’ guides my steps to the beat of a cover tune so reggae that Bob Marley comes to mind. He kinda takes over my mind on any given night, laying out the tunes, forcing my feet to move. I feel the tempo. I dance the steps in my heart.

I may be close, but I’m not there yet… Keep the door open darlin’!

Las Vegas Style for Boomers.

Is it real? Or is it just my memory? The sidewalk lit up like the morning, people strolling past, the limo waiting at the sidewalk’s end, and me… Dancing through the night. I may never escape this world I’m livin’ in, but I promise I’ll wait for you at the end.

Was it just yesterday?

I met you on the Strip while you visited someone close. But I never left your side. You took my hand in yours and we walked. I gave you my heart.

Can someone please write this song! The memory of Las Vegas style cover bands rock industry standards… I remember the moment. I …

beauty

The Real Problem With The Media’s Beauty Standards

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Finally, it looks like significant change is happening in the corporate media. No longer are only ultra-thin women meeting its previously very rigid beauty standard – or what it’s really been – an acceptability standard for women.

Women with actual fat on their body (gasp!) are now increasingly represented in mainstream television and even glossy magazines. Not only are they appearing, they are being presented as examples of great beauty.

Sports Illustrated featured on its cover the gorgeous model Ashley Graham in 2016, which made international news because she is by traditional media standards about 70 pounds overweight.

Graham is now going to be a judge on the panel for the show “America’s Next Top Model” with Tyra Banks.

The popular HBO show “Girls” made headlines over the past few years because it revealed actual cellulite on one of the stars of the show. Glamour magazine followed suit by displaying on its cover the four stars, one of them boldly fat, her cellulite purposefully exposed.

Cable TV, YouTube, and other forms of alternative media distribution set the precedent a decade and more earlier. They have allowed us to see real bodies represented on video on a regular basis.

Now, the corporate media itself is changing. Actresses on TV commercials, female weather forecasters, even pop stars… It’s happening. Women who are larger than scarecrow thin are no longer banned from representation as being normal, and even beautiful, people.

What a victory – or so it seems. After all, for decades, feminists, concerned parents, and “plus-size” activists have been objecting to the media’s presentations of ultra-thin women as the measure of female beauty, and the required body type to even qualify to be a star.

They argued that this standard puts almost every woman alive, even lean women, in the “too fat” category, and that it leads many girls and women to develop and anorexia, bulimia, and the kind of dieting that ultimately leads to binging.

Corporations like Dove have listened. The mainstream media are adjusting to these demands. The basic tenets of public discussion on “body image” and the representation of women have shifted. It’s progress, for sure.

But something’s missing here. Something about as big as an elephant in a room.

It’s something that has everything to do with why so many women and girls have “body image” issues in the first place, and why so many develop eating dysfunctions.

That something isn’t simply about an inflexible or unrealistic or even physically unhealthy beauty standard.

It’s also about how women’s beauty is treated. It’s about how women’s bodies, however diverse in size and color and age, are depicted.

To put it in feminist terminology: the problem is sexual objectification.

The Sports Illustrated cover featuring the beautiful Ashley Graham might have sent the message to women who are larger than scarecrow thin that they, too, can be sexually desirable at the weight they are.

But is this a message about respectful desire? Or something else?

Do the photos of the three …