See Tracee Ellis Ross’ Fashion Evolution, From ’90s Model to Red Carpet Queen

She only gets better with time!

Tracee Ellis Ross to Receive the Fashion Icon Award at the 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Tracee Ellis Ross is the official 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards Style Icon, which should come as no surprise to fans who have been following the actress’ career for years. She always knows how to bring the unique looks and exciting style choices to any red carpet.

Not to mention, even when she’s lounging at home, her personal style always finds a way to make her followers green with envy. Who wouldn’t be?! Not only is she an award-winning actress who currently stars on the hit ABC show Black-ish, but she’s the daughter of soul queen Diana Ross and the sister of musician and actor Evan Ross.

Since starting out as a model in the ’90s, Tracee has been nailing the fashion game for decades and luckily we’ve rounded up all her best looks over the years. She didn’t just become a fashionista over night and these are all of the incredible photos to prove it.

Tracee Ellis Ross’ Best Looks

Scroll through all of the TV star’s incredible looks through the years and see how her enviable style has evolved.

Don’t forget to tune into the 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards this Sunday to see Tracee become the official Style Icon of 2020.

(Originally published Nov. 6, 2020 at 5 a.m. PT)



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: 1999 Tracee knew how to have fun while keeping it casual. In this tank top and beige oversized pants look, she proved that you don't have to go glam to make your fashion imprint matter.


© Marcelo Bengoechea/Corbis via Getty Images
1999 Tracee knew how to have fun while keeping it casual. In this tank top and beige oversized pants look, she proved that you don’t have to go glam to make your fashion imprint matter.



Tracee Ellis Ross wearing a costume posing for the camera: In 2000, she proved that you can look like a queen any day of the week. This powerful gold outfit complete with gold pumps was just the beginning of Tracee's fashion icon status.


© SGranitz/WireImage
In 2000, she proved that you can look like a queen any day of the week. This powerful gold outfit complete with gold pumps was just the beginning of Tracee’s fashion icon status.



Tracee Ellis Ross holding a sign posing for the camera: No one made it out of the year 2000 without at least one sequin dress to their name. Tracee was not immune to the sequin trend, and rocked this sleek gown during the TV Guide Awards.


© J. Vespa/WireImage
No one made it out of the year 2000 without at least one sequin dress to their name. Tracee was not immune to the sequin trend, and rocked this sleek gown during the TV Guide Awards.



Tracee Ellis Ross talking on a cell phone: During the first season of her hit TV series Girlfriends , Tracee started to become a major muse for her street-style. In this 2000 picture, she proved that you can mix and match and still come out on top.


© Arnaldo Magnani/Getty Images
During the first season of her hit TV series Girlfriends , Tracee started to become a major muse for her street-style. In this 2000 picture, she proved that you can mix and match and still come out on top.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: She kept it classy with this fun and daring all-black ensemble at the 2001 Soul Train Awards in Los Angeles. A smoky eye, hoop earings and knee-high boots all make for the perfect early '00s fever dream.


© SGranitz/WireImage
She kept it classy with this fun and daring all-black ensemble at the 2001 Soul Train Awards in Los Angeles. A smoky eye, hoop earings and knee-high boots all make for the perfect early ’00s fever dream.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: The dress over jeans ensemble was a look in the early '00s. Tracee is nothing if not always aware of the times and fully embracing the fun and quirky staples that made the year 2002 such a fashion year to remember.


© J. Vespa/WireImage
The dress over jeans ensemble was a look in the early ’00s. Tracee is nothing if not always aware of the times and fully embracing the fun and quirky staples that made the year 2002 such a fashion year to remember.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: Tracee was caught leaving a private residence in the early '00s and proved that you can look comfy and haute couture all at the same time. Matching your headwrap with your dress? Don't mind if she does!


© J. Vespa/WireImage
Tracee was caught leaving a private residence in the early ’00s and

Read more

Revisiting the Dystopian Beauty of the ‘90s Animated Show, Aeon Flux

It makes sense that Aeon’s outfit is still popping up on social media and beyond, albeit randomly. Because while it is set in a ransacked, dystopian universe, the clothing seems also very modern. It’s also probably not completely far from what Hadid herself is wearing these days. Aeon’s signature is typically a long sleeve crop top in a dark shade of purple. (In it, her chest defies gravity and is always, well, pointing straight ahead with a purpose, just like Aeon herself.) Some details about her look are vaguely dominatrix-y, like an O-ring affixed to the middle section of her signature crop top, and she wears hiked-up thong underwear and shin-length boots that look so tight that they could be peeled off. We’ve seen nods to this style on recent runways, too, including Versace, Junya Watanabe, or Saint Laurent.

Photo: Courtesy of MTV 

The brazen sauciness of Aeon all has to do with Chung’s prior experiences working in children’s television. (He worked on the show Rugrats). For him, Aeon Flux was a way to push himself in ways that he had been limited before, which ultimately trickled into the look of the character. “I’m sure some of this was venting and putting in gratuitous kinkiness,” he says. While that kinkiness can be subversive, at times it can be overt: In one episode, Aeon wears a chastity belt, which leaves little (or a lot!) to the imagination. But it’s all a way to draw people into the show. Aeon Flux plotlines have long been known to be what Chung describes as “morally ambiguous” and could sometimes be confusing. “Even if they [viewers] were confused about what was happening or that they were unsure about what they were watching in terms of the storyline, they would still be engaged visually, viscerally,” says Chung. “Everything was designed in a way to make her riveting visually something that would draw your attention.”

The sexiness has a purpose though. Aeon’s clothing was a way to show off the range of her body, the same way a dancer’s tight clothing reveals their form. If Chung were to choose layers of clothing, it would mean that he would have to illustrate and animate differently. “As an artist, what you find is it’s actually very difficult to draw realistic clothing, and even if you do it, your drawing then becomes more about what the character is wearing rather than the character itself,” says Chung. “It’s also another reason why you see, for example, in superhero comic books they wear skin-tight outfits. It is to show off the form of the body.” Chung was also inspired by the very naked images of the late Helmut Newton, known for his nude imagery and nods to Amazonian women. “That has one thing in common with the fashion world. The whole point of doing something like a Helmut Newton photo shoot is that you’re depicting scenes, which are kind of idealized and it’s not realistic,” says Chung. “It’s not trying to

Read more

Helena Christensen releasing 90s inspired clothing collection



Helena Christensen posing for the camera


© Bang Showbiz
Helena Christensen

Helena Christensen has teamed up with Anine Bing to launching a 1990s-inspired clothing line.

The 51-year-old Danish supermodel – who was one of the biggest catwalk stars of that decade – has worked with the designer, who is also from Denmark, to create an 11-piece capsule collection that is directly influenced by the style of that era,

Helena admits she only has “amazing” memories of that time and thinks the fashion for women during the 90s was unique and “powerful”.

Speaking to WWD, she said: “It was such a great time period for fashion. I only had amazing experiences from that time. I feel that the way women dressed at that time had a powerful feeling to it. There was a businesswoman aspect but in a laid-back way.”

The collection is to be released on November 10 and is comprised of T-shirts, tailoring, jeans, a bodysuit and a silk jumpsuit, and is priced from $99 (£75) to $499 (£380).

Helena and Anine worked on the range for over a year and overcame any challenges of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic by having meetings over Zoom and visiting each other at their homes.

Discussing the creative process, Helena said: “We just both brainstormed ideas of our own personal style and found a middle ground of what could work for both of us.”

Anine added: “She’s a little more experimental, a little more bohemian, relaxed in a way. I’m maybe a little more classic, but I also love rock ‘n’ roll. We tried to tie those two together.

“It’s been a super tough year for all of us, right, including myself. It’s been a wild year and a rollercoaster and super hard. I have many days being home crying, trying to figure out how to do this. And also being a mom, you know, doing homeschooling while designing and trying to run this company with so many employees.

“With that said, my goal with designing is to empower women, and I think that’s more important than ever that we feel strong and confident and believe in ourselves and be here for a better change.

“So, hopefully with this collaboration and my whole collection in general, I hope and think I will continue to empower women and feel like their best version of themselves during this crazy time. I’m a positive person, and I try to look positive on everything, even though it can be hard.”

Source Article

Read more

Helena Christensen | Helena Christensen releasing 90s inspired clothing collection

Helena Christensen has teamed up with Anine Bing to launching a 1990s-inspired clothing line.

The 51-year-old Danish supermodel – who was one of the biggest catwalk stars of that decade – has worked with the designer, who is also from Denmark, to create an 11-piece capsule collection that is directly influenced by the style of that era,

Helena admits she only has “amazing” memories of that time and thinks the fashion for women during the 90s was unique and “powerful”.

Speaking to WWD, she said: “It was such a great time period for fashion. I only had amazing experiences from that time. I feel that the way women dressed at that time had a powerful feeling to it. There was a businesswoman aspect but in a laid-back way.”

The collection is to be released on November 10 and is comprised of T-shirts, tailoring, jeans, a bodysuit and a silk jumpsuit, and is priced from $99 (£75) to $499 (£380).

Helena and Anine worked on the range for over a year and overcame any challenges of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic by having meetings over Zoom and visiting each other at their homes.

Discussing the creative process, Helena said: “We just both brainstormed ideas of our own personal style and found a middle ground of what could work for both of us.”

Anine added: “She’s a little more experimental, a little more bohemian, relaxed in a way. I’m maybe a little more classic, but I also love rock ‘n’ roll. We tried to tie those two together.

“It’s been a super tough year for all of us, right, including myself. It’s been a wild year and a rollercoaster and super hard. I have many days being home crying, trying to figure out how to do this. And also being a mom, you know, doing homeschooling while designing and trying to run this company with so many employees.

“With that said, my goal with designing is to empower women, and I think that’s more important than ever that we feel strong and confident and believe in ourselves and be here for a better change.

“So, hopefully with this collaboration and my whole collection in general, I hope and think I will continue to empower women and feel like their best version of themselves during this crazy time. I’m a positive person, and I try to look positive on everything, even though it can be hard.”

Source Article

Read more

Prada’s Endlessly Recyclable Nylon Jacket Brings ’90s Vibes Into the Future of Fashion



a close up of a coat: The next stage of the inimitable Italian brand's ReNylon project provides some hope for the days ahead.


© Ben Alsop
The next stage of the inimitable Italian brand’s ReNylon project provides some hope for the days ahead.

SHOP $1,980, prada.com

Welcome to the first installment of The Investment, a new regular column highlighting those pieces—a little pricier, a lot nicer, and entirely worth the money—that we can’t help but advocate for you owning. These are the things our editors love and respect. The picks with a story to tell and a real reason to exist. Looking to put your dollars in the right place? Here’s how.

It’s hard to imagine that a little black nylon backpack could have caused quite the stir it did in 1984, when Miuccia Prada first posited it as the new statement in minimalist luxury. Up to that point, luxury—in accessories especially—pretty much meant leather or nothing. It certainly did not mean nylon. But Miuccia’s intellectual finger stuck up at traditional, fixated notions of elegance not only suggested nylon as a new definition of luxury, it also brought a sense of minimalist utility that had all-too-often been absent from fashion.

When, for fall 1995, she ushered in her first men’s collection, the mania for Prada’s little triangle logo jumped the gender divide. In stark contrast to the glitzy, ’70s-inspired fashion that was elsewhere on the runway, Prada was pared-down, devoid of pattern or embellishment—a futurist’s uniform. And if to emphasize that this was not business as usual, Prada hired men who were not models, but serious actors, to create her first campaigns. Over four seasons John Malkovich, Tim Roth, Willem Dafoe, and Joaquin Phoenix effectively endorsed Prada as the modern, cool, thinking man’s label. And that black nylon was everywhere: From accessories to suits, it became a kind of shorthand for ’90s minimalism.



a close up of a leather bag: The logo that launched a thousand ships (or, er...fans).


© Ben Alsop
The logo that launched a thousand ships (or, er…fans).

Sustainability now—and forever.

Last year a growing interest in sustainability in fashion brought about the launch of a new kind of nylon at Prada. It looked as felt the same as the old stuff, but this time it was 100 percent recycled. To debut this new cloth, Miuccia Prada chose to recycle some of her thinking, too, recreating six of the best-selling men’s and women’s styles from the ’90s. ReNylon, as the cloth is called in-house, is the result of a lengthy collaboration between Prada and Italian yarn producer Aquafil. It is made from gathered plastic fishing nets, ocean flotsam, and textile fiber waste like carpets from landfills that are recycled in Italy and Slovenia. Aquafil first breaks down, and then re-polymerizes, the materials, spinning the monofilaments into new nylon yarn. Last year Aquafil estimated that for every 10,000 tons of Econyl produced from recycled plastics, 70,000 barrels of petroleum would be saved.

Gallery: Moschino’s High Fashion Puppet Show Was Everything We Needed Right Now (Harper’s Bazaar)

SHOP $1,980, prada.com



a bag of luggage: Though Prada’s nylon offerings started in accessories, this fall’s ReNylon collection comprises a whole lineup of ready-to-wear.


© Ben Alsop
Though Prada’s nylon offerings started in accessories, this fall’s ReNylon collection comprises a whole lineup of ready-to-wear.

Way beyond bags.

This month Prada goes

Read more