Want some holiday shopping advice? Stay in your car with curbside Pickup at Sam’s Club

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Remember the days of wandering the mall and snacking on a huge pretzel from the food court while you casually browsed for gifts? Fast forward to 2020 and the goal for holiday shopping this season is to be safely tucked away, not touching things.  

So, why should you do curbside Pickup instead of Prime delivery or (gasp) your usual in-store shopping? Let us count the ways. 

Next time your roomie is gabbing your ear off, grab your phone and tackle your list on the Sam’s Club app. You can also buy just one thing, like a new pair of noise-canceling earbuds. You’ll still get free Pickup. 

Fill your virtual cart with a new for nana, a for your pops, and a for dinner, choose a pickup time, and then park it while the pros load the trunk.

Get in on a for $100 a year and curbside Pickup is always free. Even Basic members, who pay just $45 a year, can get free Pickup right now for a limited time. 

Pickup is from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day, but one of the perks of being a Plus member is that you get special curbside service starting at 7 a.m. Monday through Saturday. Early bird gets it every time. 

If you’re tethered to your desk all day, do your shopping while waiting for that video meeting to start. Then take your desk on the go as you fire off some emails while parked in the Sam’s Club Pickup spot. Ah, multitasking. 

If you’re used to two-day delivery schedules, then Sam’s Club Pickup will feel like warp speed. Some orders of 10 items or less can be picked up in a measly four hours.

If you’re still waiting for that hot pot you ordered weeks ago, Pickup delivers the goods straight to your car. Nothing’s lost in transit or ripe for package thieves. 

Want some holiday shopping advice? Stay in your car with curbside Pickup at Sam’s Club

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Outrage as Italian TV show gives ‘sexy shopping’ advice

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Experts’ advice on shopping during a higher-risk Black Friday

  • Black Friday looks totally different thanks to the coronavirus.
  • The CDC has classified shopping in crowded stores as higher risk.
  • Experts recommend avoiding crowds, wearing a mask, and having a plan.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This year, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classified Black Friday shopping in crowded stores as a “higher-risk activity” along with “attending large indoor gatherings with people from outside of your household.” Shopping online is rated as “lower risk.”

It all means the shopping holiday the day after Thanksgiving will look different this year.

Most stores that historically begin

Black Friday
deals on Thanksgiving will remain closed on the holiday, opening early Friday morning instead. Walmart, Target, and Best Buy have all reduced Black Friday sales hours in stores compared to previous years, instead moving many deals online and spreading them through November, with increased options for curbside pickup and online orders.

Dr. Stephen Kessler at the Harvard School of Public Health told Business Insider that shopping in stores this year carries a “midlevel risk, which is increasing,” as cases spike across the US. The timing of the holiday is “pretty unfortunate,” he said, as these spikes increase risks of infection.

Read more: Walmart’s Black Friday plans are completely different this year due to the pandemic — here’s what to expect

Based on studies he’s read, “stores aren’t as high risk as places where people gather for a while without masks, like indoor dining. In terms of risky behavior, this is middle ground,” Kessler, who studies the spread of infectious diseases, told Business Insider. To understand where it falls as a risk, he said that it is safer than going to a restaurant, but riskier than going on an outdoor walk. Kessler wouldn’t say shopping in person is “unsafe,” but “I personally would try to take measures to do it more safely, mostly online,” he said. 

target shopper shopping cart store



Brendan McDermid/Reuters


Dr. Stanley Perlman, a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Iowa, told Business Insider that “masks and social distancing are most important,” while gloves may be counterproductive. “Safety is relative this year,” he wrote in an email, “the risks will be lower if the rules are followed.” 

Perlman and Kessler agreed that avoiding crowds will also be key for shoppers’ and retail workers’ safety. Jill Weatherhead, an assistant professor of infectious disease at Baylor University, told Business Insider that mitigation strategies are important. “Going during off hours, low crowd times, and having a plan when you’re going to these stores is going to be critical.” She compared Black Friday to grocery shopping, and said that knowing what you’re in the store for and getting it without spending more time than necessary would be a helpful strategy. 

Read more: REI gives its employees a paid day off on Black Friday, but hourly workers say that it’s a ‘marketing move’ and that the company has strayed from its co-op roots

To evaluate the risks of shopping at particular stores, Weatherhead said shoppers should

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St. Louis Wedding Planner Shares Advice for Changing Your Date Amid the Pandemic | Wedding

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Bridal background with planner checklist

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Planning a wedding includes a lot of preparation – not only for what is expected, but also for what’s not. Most can agree that the COVID-19 pandemic wasn’t on the list of the expected, thus making couples across the country carefully consider whether to continue creating their dream day or to change their date. Which begs the question: How does one decide whether to “change the date”?

“Changing your date can be stressful – you’re concerned that people might not want to come or they might not be able to make it,” says Charley Coldon, the owner and lead coordinator of Coda’s Events. “Just remember the reason for this special day. Your day – you celebrate you and the love of your life. It doesn’t matter where it is, when it is or who’s there. As long as you get to celebrate your love.”

From there, Coldon says the first step is checking in with vendors and contacts.

“One of the first things my clients and I talk about now are vendors’ COVID precautions, reschedule policies and deposits,” Coldon says. “When you decide to change your wedding date, the first person you should communicate with is your wedding planner/coordinator. If you don’t have a wedding coordinator, start with your venue and work your way through your vendor list. Make sure all of your vendors are solidified before you inform your guests that you’re changing your date!”

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‘Don’t be surprised if we don’t know’: This H-E-B shopping advice on Reddit is crushing it

Over on Reddit you can find the humorous musings and advice from an H-E-B employee who claims to work the nightshift and has decided to help customers out during their holiday shopping with some hilarious tips, like not being surprised the curbside or stocking crew doesn’t know where something is.

“Don’t be surprised if we don’t know. It’s a big f**king store,” the employee wrote in the Reddit post on Saturday.

The staff member noted shoppers should shop early or super late to avoid large crowds. Because if you go at dawn, the employee states, you only have to fight either your mom or other’s people’s mothers, a few dads, and lots of grandparents.

“This is noob level combat,” the person wrote of the morning H-E-B scene. “Most are polite and sorry about being in the way.”

READ ALSO: ‘This is honestly disgusting’: TikTok video calls out San Antonio for not wearing masks downtown

For the late-night customers, the employee notes that “oddballs” are just people who are too tired for any kind of “bulls**t.”

If you are sending your significant other with a “crazy list” to the store, the employees suggest to print it from the H-E-B website first, as it shows which items are in a specific store.

“So many of your fathers/sons/husbands are just drifting the store with handwritten lists like lost puppies,” the employee joked. “I’ve seen a few in so desperate for direction the Jehovah’s Witnesses were able to recruit them.”

The employee also  mentioned that if a staff member knows where something is, they will tell you. However, if you ask follow-up questions the employee most likely won’t know as there “100,000 items on that aisle,” the employee said.

Lastly, the employee said if a staff member approaches you asking you if you need help finding something – take it.

“You look more pathetic than everyone else, and you should take the assist,” they wrote.

Read more about the Reddit post on the H-E-B tips below: 

Holidays are here, Quick PSA from HEB employee from r/sanantonio

Priscilla Aguirre is a general assignment reporter for MySA.com | [email protected] | @CillaAguirre

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Industry Icon Leonard Lauder’s Best Advice for Beauty Entrepreneurs

Photo credit: Courtesy of Leonard Lauder
Photo credit: Courtesy of Leonard Lauder

From ELLE

Photo credit: Courtesy of Leonard Lauder
Photo credit: Courtesy of Leonard Lauder

Leonard Lauder, the Chairman Emeritus and former CEO of Estée Lauder Companies, was born the same year that his mother founded what would later grow into one of the most esteemed beauty companies of all time. His mother, the late Estée Lauder, touched upon her life as a beauty entrepreneur in her 1986 memoir Estée: A Success Story. Now, it’s her son’s turn to tell all in The Company I Keep: My Life in Beauty, which is out today.

“The company and I grew up together,” Lauder writes. “Our lives as closely paired as twins.” Fast forward to 2020: Estée Lauder Companies is made up of more than 25 brands (including Bumble and bumble, Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle, GlamGlow, Tom Ford Beauty, and M.A.C) and sold in 150 countries—a fantastic legacy that all started as a shop-in-shop at a Manhattan Upper West Side hair salon named House of Ash Blondes.

The pages of The Company I Keep are filled with a little bit of everything: industry gossip, quippy tales that will have you smiling, exciting history (in 1969, Estée Lauder, Revlon, and Helena Rubenstein all called the General Motors Building home, and it quickly nicknamed the “General Odors Building” because of all of the distinctly fragranced floors), and most importantly, genius business advice for anybody in any stage of their career. Below, three lessons from the book for any beauty entrepreneur:

You can start a successful business, even during an economic downturn.

Whether it’s post-Great Depression or mid-COVID recession, there’s still room for bright ideas. “Launching a business—especially during the darkest days of the Depression—took a combination of commitment, creativity, charisma, and chutzpah,” Lauder says. “My mother had all four.” The business started with the Super Rich All-Purpose Cream, which Estée and her uncle (an esthetician) mixed up in her apartment kitchen. Lauder inherited the same determination—he came up with the phrase “Lipstick Index” during the 2001 recession when the beauty business saw women seeking prestige lipstick as an affordable indulgence.

Talk is both cheap and valuable.

Estée quickly realized that word of mouth was her most incredible advertising tool—so she invested in it. “Word-of-mouth advertising was inexpensive and effective,” the author shares. “It became the heart of [my mother’s] strategy to build the business.” That included handing out free samples (not only for a gift with purchase but to anybody who approached the counter) and telling anybody, yes, anybody, about her brand. It makes sense—how many times have you texted a friend about a beauty product you love?

Trust your gut—and trademark your ideas.

“Lipstick [used to be] bullet-shaped,” Lauder writes. “A woman had to purse her lips around the stick to apply the color, which often left lipstick on her teeth or smeared on her lip line.” So, one day he pulled out a Gilette razor and—swipe—cut the bullet to be at an angle. And that was that. “I didn’t

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This H-E-B shopping advice on Reddit is crushing it

Over on Reddit you can find the humorous musings and advice from an H-E-B employee who claims to work the nightshift and has decided to help customers out during their holiday shopping with some hilarious tips, like not being surprised the curbside or stocking crew doesn’t know where something is.

“Don’t be surprised if we don’t know. It’s a big f**king store,” the employee wrote in the Reddit post on Saturday.

The staff member noted shoppers should shop early or super late to avoid large crowds. Because if you go at dawn, the employee states, you only have to fight either your mom or other’s people’s mothers, a few dads, and lots of grandparents.


“This is noob level combat,” the person wrote of the morning H-E-B scene. “Most are polite and sorry about being in the way.”

READ ALSO: ‘This is honestly disgusting’: TikTok video calls out San Antonio for not wearing masks downtown

For the late-night customers, the employee notes that “oddballs” are just people who are too tired for any kind of “bulls**t.”

If you are sending your significant other with a “crazy list” to the store, the employees suggest to print it from the H-E-B website first, as it shows which items are in a specific store.

“So many of your fathers/sons/husbands are just drifting the store with handwritten lists like lost puppies,” the employee joked. “I’ve seen a few in so desperate for direction the Jehovah’s Witnesses were able to recruit them.”

The employee also  mentioned that if a staff member knows where something is, they will tell you. However, if you ask follow-up questions the employee most likely won’t know as there “100,000 items on that aisle,” the employee said.

Lastly, the employee said if a staff member approaches you asking you if you need help finding something – take it.

“You look more pathetic than everyone else, and you should take the assist,” they wrote.

Read more about the Reddit post on the H-E-B tips below: 

Holidays are here, Quick PSA from HEB employee from r/sanantonio

Priscilla Aguirre is a general assignment reporter for MySA.com | [email protected] | @CillaAguirre

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Thrift stores and a capsule wardrobe: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez offers fashion advice to Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush

Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush asked for help on Twitter.

As a newly-elected member of Congress, Cori Bush, who will make history as the first Black woman to represent Missouri in Congress, is struggling with something many women face, how to create an affordable and professional wardrobe.

Bush, a single mom who has worked as a nurse and a pastor, took to Twitter this week to talk about being a “regular person” going to work in Washington D.C.

“The reality of being a regular person going to Congress is that it’s really expensive to get the business clothes I need for the Hill. So I’m going thrift shopping tomorrow,” she wrote.

One of the first people to offer Bush advice was Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who made history in 2018 as the youngest woman elected to Congress.

PHOTO: (FILES) In this file photo taken on June 23, 2020 US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), speaks with a voter near a polling station during the New York primaries Election Day  in New York City.

The now 31-year-old New York Democrat, who once made a student loan payment during a Congressional hearing, offered Bush advice on how to make the most of secondhand stores and to rely on a capsule wardrobe to keep costs down.

“Thrifting, renting, and patience as you get your closet together sis,” wrote Ocasio-Cortez, who in a later tweet promised Bush a shopping day together.

PHOTO: Cori Bush, the Democratic candidate in Missouri's 1st District, meets with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-New York) in her Capitol Hill office.

Bush, who will earn a $174,000 salary once she starts her term in Congress, has spoken openly about her financial struggles, and particularly about the difficulties she’s faced working and paying her bills while also running for Congress.

After her tweet, the Congresswoman-elect received budget-friendly tips from not just Ocasio-Cortez, but also Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., the four of whom have become known as “The Squad.”

Pressley, who earlier this year revealed she has alopecia, gave Bush some beauty tips, writing on Twitter, “For all those media hits, don’t sleep on the lashes or HD make up products at CVS. Black Opal, NYX, Wet N Wild are the truth!”

Tlaib, a mom of two, told Bush that she still wears maternity clothes under her blazers, adding, “P.S. I get the most compliments from the clothes I got from thrift shops.”

Omar shared with Bush her tips for where to find the best scarves and said she specializes in outfits that are “$50 or less.”

“I love it! And scarves are my fav. Thank you,” Bush replied to Omar.

Other female politicians also chimed in to recommend rental sites like Rent the Runway and thrift store options on Capitol Hill.

Rep. Jahana Hayes, who in 2018 became the first African-American woman to

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez offers advice to newly-elected congresswoman on how to economically and sustainably afford Congress-appropriate clothing



a woman wearing a dress: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., walks up the House steps for a vote in the Capitol on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images


© Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., walks up the House steps for a vote in the Capitol on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

  • Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez advised Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush to thrift and rent clothes, so she can affordably have a Congress-appropriate wardrobe. 
  • Ocasio-Cortez has repeatedly spoken about her financial struggles growing up. 
  • She’s been repeatedly criticized by conservatives for her wardrobe. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez offered some wardrobe advice to Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush on how to sustainably and economically afford clothes for her new job in Washington.

Bush on Tuesday wrote on Twitter: “The reality of being a regular person going to Congress is that it’s really expensive to get the business clothes I need for the Hill. So I’m going thrift shopping tomorrow.” 

In response, Ocasio-Cortez advised Bush to thrift and rent. 

 

“You can also thrift and buy second hand online, which helped me get higher quality, longer-lasting things that would normally be out of budget. Good luck!” she wrote.

Conservatives have long scrutinized Ocasio-Cortez for her wardrobe. In 2018, Eddie Scarry, a conservative author, and reporter tweeted a picture taken from behind Ocasio-Cortez and criticized her clothes as being too nice. Scarry said they didn’t match her working-class public persona.

Read moreHere are 30 top progressives ready to lob grenades, cause headaches and otherwise cajole the incoming Biden administration from its left flank

Ocasio-Cortez, who campaigned on her working-class background during her first bid for Congress has also been public about her financial struggles. 

“If I walked into Congress wearing a sack, they would laugh & take a picture of my backside. If I walk in with my best sale-rack clothes, they laugh & take a picture of my backside,” she tweeted in response to Scarry’s comments. 

 

The congresswoman was also recently criticized for wearing high-end clothes in a photoshoot with Vanity Fair. The clothes for that photoshoot were borrowed. 

Ocasio-Cortez was not the only woman politician to offer advice for Bush.

Rep. Rashida Tlaib chimed in telling Bush: “Cori, I still wear some of my maternity clothes under those blazers. P.S. I get the most compliments from the clothes I got from thrift shops.”

Marama Davidson, a member of Parliament in New Zealand, tweeted, “Kia ora, greetings Cori and Rashida. Coleader of the Green Party of Aotearoa NZ here, Minister of the Executive Council. We have a strong proud thrift tradition that extends to elected reps. Here I am wearing my thrift suit on election night.”

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My bridezilla sisters expect me to make their wedding dresses, and more advice from Dear Prudence.

A woman sewing a wedding dress.
Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by cglade/iStock/Getty Images Plus.

Dear Prudence is online weekly to chat live with readers. Here’s an edited transcript of this week’s chat.

Danny Lavery: Hello, everyone! Let’s distract ourselves with one another’s personal lives, shall we?

Q. Dresses: I am crafty. In an act of hubris and love, I agreed to DIY my best friend’s wedding dress since she had no budget. It took $100, a dozen thrift stores, 100 hours, and a pint of blood, but I was able to convert an ’80s monstrosity into a rather darling modern frock. She got married and bragged about me on social media, but now everyone and their Aunt Betty is expecting me to do the same for them!

The worst are my half-sister and stepsister, and they have competing weddings going on since my stepsister had to reschedule. They both are borderline bridezillas. My half-sister lives in another state and expects me to hand-sew her wedding dress via Zoom. My stepsister has sent me pics that far extend out of skills. My stepmother is borderline hysterical trying to keep the peace and my father has retreated from every fight. I am proud of what I did, but I share a house with my friend and her husband. There is no way I could do what I did with someone far away. And I don’t want to again. I love my family but I am hanging up the needle and thread. Help!

A: You do not need my help! You know what you need to do, which is say no. You are prepared to say no, you’re aware that you have to say no (because you’re being asked to put together dresses that won’t just look great on a wedding day, but that will also reconstruct the Titanic, cure disease, and julienne fries), and you’re going to say no. And it’s going to be fine. Your stepmother is not bound by a curse to get upset every time your stepsister gets upset; she’s making a choice and she’s free to stop whenever she’s ready. Your stepsister and your half-sister are not being driven by a wedding-induced infection to bully their relatives into promising favors—they are making unreasonable demands and hoping nobody pushes back. You can say no calmly, firmly, and without taking responsibility for the ensuing “But how could yous” and “But what will I wear now that I’m forced to admit you don’t secretly have Oscar de La Renta in your home office?” You did not promise anything to anyone else when you made your friend’s dress.

When I was a kid, I used to ride horses at a local barn that was staffed by terrifyingly self-possessed Midwestern women who had little slogans on their desks like “I can only please one person per day” and “Failure to plan on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.” They intimidated the hell out of me, especially because I didn’t know anything about English-style saddles

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