Jennifer Lopez Reveals Her ‘Cure-All’ Skincare Ingredient Ahead of Beauty Line Launch

How does Jennifer Lopez look as enviously glowing as she does? She let Vogue know her secret ingredient while chatting about her upcoming skincare line JLo Beauty.

“My mom used to say that olive oil was the cure-all for everything,” the 2020 Billboard Women in Music Icon Award recipient explained, referring to her JLo Beauty Olive Complex, a blend of squalane, fermented olive oil, extra-virgin olive oil, and olive leaf extract.

The multihyphenate’s eight-piece skincare collection launches on January 1, and includes a cream cleanser, multitasking serum, “wonder cream,” sunscreen, eye cream, masks, complexion booster and a dietary supplement. “Everyone fought me hardest on the supplements,” Lopez explained of her once-daily capsules. “But skin care doesn’t work without boosting what’s going on inside.”

And while her beauty line is dropping in just a few weeks, one thing that Lopez is taking her time with is her sweet relationship with fiancé Alex Rodriguez. The couple had to postpone their wedding twice as the coronavirus continues to spread, but she told Access Hollywood that she’s in “no rush.”

“You know we’ve talked about so many different things cause we had to cancel the wedding last year because of COVID, because of the quarantine, and we actually did it twice, which people don’t know, where we had it in different times – first one canceled and then second one canceled as well – and so I don’t know,” she explained. “We kind of have let it go for a second.”

We’re good. Everything’s cool. It will happen when the time is right,” she added of her relationship with the former New York Yankee. See below.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

Why has wedding of Japan’s Princess Mako still not gone ahead? | Japan

They have been together since university, their emotional bond apparently stronger than ever despite being separated by an ocean and a continent. And they have the blessing of a likely future emperor.

But for Japan’s Princess Mako – the eldest daughter of the first in line to the Chrysanthemum throne – and her boyfriend, Kei Komuro, the sound of wedding bells has grown more distant in the three years since they made their relationship public.

The couple are no closer to exchanging vows after their plans to marry two years ago were derailed by revelations that the would-be groom’s mother was embroiled in a financial dispute. The saga has not only fuelled unusually intrusive media and public interest in the private lives of Japan’s royals; it has also brought the country’s succession crisis into sharp relief.

Japan celebrated when, in May 2017, Mako and Komuro, a contemporary at International Christian University in Tokyo who does not come from a royal background, said they planned to get engaged later in the year and marry in November 2018. But in February 2018, the imperial household agency said the wedding had been put off for two years following reports that Komuro’s mother owed money, including education fees for her son, to an ex-fiance. A date for the wedding has yet to be set.

Princess Mako and her fiance, Kei Komuro, in 2017
Princess Mako and her fiance, Kei Komuro, in 2017. Photograph: POOL/Reuters

This week, Mako’s father, Crown Prince Akishino, gave the marriage his blessing but suggested that the couple, who are both 29, had yet to win over a sceptical Japanese public, who will foot the bill for a lump sum Mako will receive when she marries and leaves the imperial household.

“I approve of them getting married,” he said in comments to journalists ahead of his 55th birthday on Monday. “The constitution says that marriage shall be based only on the mutual consent of both sexes. I believe I, as a parent, should respect their intentions if marriage is what they truly want.”

But, he added, Komuro’s family needed to make a “visible” response to his mother’s financial troubles, which, according to Japanese media, have not been resolved two years after they were revealed by a weekly magazine.

Akishino, who became crown prince after his elder brother, Naruhito, ascended the throne last year, was quoted by the Kyodo news agency as saying: “From my point of view, I don’t think they are in a situation in which many people are convinced and pleased [about their proposed marriage]” – adding that Mako was aware that the public was not fully behind the union.

When Mako marries, she will immediately lose her royal status and, like the previous emperor’s daughter, Sayako Kuroda, live a comparatively “ordinary” life with her commoner husband beyond the walls of the imperial palace in Tokyo.

The family she leaves behind will shrink again. As the Asahi Shimbun newspaper has pointed out, only seven members of the imperial family are below 40, and all but one of them

Read more

Why has wedding of Japan’s Princess Mako still not gone ahead?

They have been together since university, their emotional bond apparently stronger than ever despite being separated by an ocean and a continent. And they have the blessing of a future emperor.



a person in a car: Photograph: Masatoshi Okauchi/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Masatoshi Okauchi/Rex/Shutterstock

But for Japan’s Princess Mako – the eldest daughter of the first in line to the Chrysanthemum throne – and her boyfriend, Kei Komuro, the sound of wedding bells has grown more distant in the three years since they made their relationship public.

The couple are no closer to exchanging vows after their plans to marry two years ago were derailed by revelations that the would-be groom’s mother was embroiled in a financial dispute. The saga has not only fuelled unusually intrusive media and public interest in the private lives of Japan’s royals; it has also brought the country’s succession crisis into sharp relief.

Japan celebrated when, in May 2017, Mako and Komuro, a contemporary at International Christian University in Tokyo who does not come from a royal background, said they planned to get engaged later in the year and marry in November 2018. But in February 2018, the imperial household agency said the wedding had been put off for two years following reports that Komuro’s mother owed money, including education fees for her son, to an ex-fiance. A date for the wedding has yet to be set.



a man wearing a hat: Princess Mako, who is the daughter of Crown Prince Akishino.


© Photograph: Masatoshi Okauchi/Rex/Shutterstock
Princess Mako, who is the daughter of Crown Prince Akishino.

This week Mako’s father, Crown Prince Akishino, gave the marriage his blessing but suggested that the couple, who are both 29, had yet to win over a sceptical Japanese public, who will foot the bill for a lump sum Mako will receive when she marries and leaves the imperial household.

“I approve of them getting married,” he said in comments to journalists ahead of his 55th birthday on Monday. “The constitution says that marriage shall be based only on the mutual consent of both sexes. I believe I, as a parent, should respect their intentions if marriage is what they truly want.”

But, he added, Komuro’s family needed to make a “visible” response to his mother’s financial troubles, which, according to Japanese media, have not been resolved two years after they were revealed by a weekly magazine.

Akishino, who became crown prince after his elder brother, Naruhito, ascended the throne last year, was quoted by the Kyodo news agency as saying: “From my point of view, I don’t think they are in a situation in which many people are convinced and pleased [about their proposed marriage]” – adding that Mako was aware that the public was not fully behind the union.

When Mako marries, she will immediately lose her royal status and, like the previous emperor’s daughter, Sayako Kuroda, live a comparatively “ordinary” life with her commoner husband beyond the walls of the imperial palace in Tokyo.

The family she leaves behind will shrink again. As the Asahi Shimbun newspaper has pointed out, only seven members of the imperial

Read more

Can Fashion Salvage Christmas Sales? | The Week Ahead, BoF Professional

THE CHEAT SHEET

Can Fashion Save Christmas?

Christmas shopping in Milan, Italy | Source: Getty

Christmas shopping in Milan, Italy | Source: Getty

  • Many European countries are cautiously emerging from lockdowns, allowing retailers to reopen as they head into the crucial Christmas shopping season.

  • Covid-19 cases are surging in the US, raising fresh concerns about the economy and the prospect of new restrictions.

  • E-commerce sales jumped over Black Friday weekend, but traffic at stores — where they were allowed to open — was light.

This Christmas is set to be a shopping season like no other. After a year of slumping sales, festive purchases are even more important, and less certain, than ever. On the plus side, forced store closures across much of Europe are set to ease heading into December. Most retailers will be able to reopen, though unlike in the summer there will be no full relaxation of restrictions.

There are signs consumers are in the mood to shop, too. In the US, the National Retail Federation optimistically forecast sales will grow between 3.6 percent and 5.2 percent in November and December compared to 2019. Online sales on Black Friday are set to hit a record this year, according to Adobe Analytics, though whether that will be sufficient to offset a downturn in in-person spending remains to be seen.

The outlook in the country is darkening as coronavirus cases mount at an alarming pace. Even if shops stay open, it’s unclear if consumers will feel confident going to them. Retailers have been grappling with how to persuade shoppers to spend as much online as they would in store for months, with many kicking off Black Friday sales early in the hopes of extending the traditional festive shopping frenzy. Most are doubling down on e-commerce and offering flexible delivery options like curb-side pickups or rewards for consumers who buy early to avoid the Christmas logistics crunch.

The Bottom Line: The next few weeks are make or break for many retailers. Few can afford to enter January with large amounts of unsold inventory, and a weak Christmas shopping season could mean many don’t make it through 2021.

The Fashion Calendar Rolls On

Nadja Swarovski, Dame Natalie Massenet and Caroline Rush at the 2016 Fashion Awards in London. Courtesy.

Nadja Swarovski, Dame Natalie Massenet and Caroline Rush at the 2016 Fashion Awards in London. Courtesy.

  • Chanel’s Métiers d’Art presentation will go ahead on Dec. 1 at a lavish chateau in the Loire Valley, but the brand’s clients will have to settle for watching when it’s broadcast online.

  • The Fashion Awards will also take place on Dec. 3, with a short film announcing this year’s 20 honourees instead of the usual gala dinner.

  • Balenciaga will present its Fall 2021 collection via a video game slated for release on Dec. 6.

Despite the pandemic, the fashion industry is pressing ahead with its December schedule, at a social distance, of course. Chanel’s Métiers d’Art show, designed to showcase the skill of the brand’s specialist ateliers, has in the past been a large-scale marketing event, with attendees jet-setting to locations like New York and Tokyo. This year, Chanel will

Read more

Demand for shopping apps spikes ahead of Black Friday and Cyber Monday

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are expected to be key mobile shopping events, according to data from mobile analytics and insights provider App Annie.

Consumers are estimated to spend over 110 million hours in shopping apps on Android devices during the shopping period that now extends over two weeks.

And mobile is a key device this season given the quick adoption of mobile in light of the coronavirus crisis.

App Annie said that demand for shopping apps was up in the days before Black Friday with Walmart ranking top among US shopping apps overall, followed by Amazon, Target, OfferUp and Wish.

The rapid adoption of shopping apps is also having an effect on ad spending.

Data produced by MoPub earlier this year found that ad spend on retail apps grew 32% year-on-year in October 2020.

John Bonanno, Revenue Manager at MoPub said: “This data suggests that despite everything that happened in 2020, there is still increasing interest in the retail/apparel sector and the holiday shopping on mobile should be at full swing.”

Full and rewarded video mobile ad formats have proven most effective for larger retailers according to the research. Rewarded video click-through rates grew 7.2% year-on-year.

“One interesting trend MoPub has noticed in recent months,” John Bonanno noted, “ is an increase in CTR for Big Box Stores for app-endemic full-screen ad formats including rewarded video. This tells us that advertisers are successfully expanding into newer ad formats to engage audiences.”

Source Article

Read more

Holiday shopping looking a little different due to pandemic, but shoppers already turning out ahead of official Black Friday

EAST HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH) — Holiday shopping is going to look a little different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but shoppers are already turnout out ahead of official Black Friday.

With the holiday and the pandemic, you might be wondering what’s closed and what’s open this Thanksgiving.

We were at Cabela’s in East Hartford Thursday to check out the possible lines of shoppers ahead of Black Friday.

Normally, there would be lines around the block. The malls are always crowded, Best Buy would be directing traffic in the parking lot. But Thursday, we saw most everything shut down.

Cabela’s was opened and they had a steady stream of people, but there were no lines and no waiting for the Black Friday deals!

When we talked to people, some came for the deals, others to support the workers, some for a return to a sense of normalcy in a time of COVID, and some just straight up came to see the Big Guy (Santa)!

Meha Srivastav, a mother with two of her kids from Glastonbury said, “We are going to see Santa…We told our neighbors we were going to see Santa and they were looking at us like ‘isn’t it a little early?’ And we are like ‘there are no lines!’”

Dylan Bassett also of Glastonbury said, “My grandmother took my baby cousins here the other day to go see Santa. It was all appointment, there were no lines, they were in and out in 10 minutes instead of waiting for a full two hours like I had to do when I was a kid.”

Bassett added that he expected to see more people out for the sales: “I expected it to be extremely busy here. It’s the day before Black Friday but I was in and out in 15 minutes and there are shocking a lot of deals. I was able to get the boots I wanted for 30 bucks off.”

Patrick of East Hartford said he came to the outdoor sports store because “I just saw it in the newspaper earlier so that is why I came by. I was like ‘wow we need that, we need that, we need that!’ And somethings were 30 or 40 or 50% off.”

Patrick also said he expected more shoppers: “I was expecting the parking lot to be half full, but I typically don’t do the Black Friday thing but now with everything going on I think people look forward to trying to get back to normal a little bit. Do you know?”

Bonnie Vaichus of Woodbury said shopping in-store supports local business: “I don’t want to give online my business. I want to support my state and support the people that are working here every day. There are a bunch of people in there that come here every day to work, and they need their jobs.”

And while Cabela’s closed Thursday at 6 p.m., they will be open again Friday and people are coming out saying there are more

Read more

Is the Mall Open on Thanksgiving 2020? When Shopping Starts Ahead of Black Friday

Most malls are closed on Thanksgiving Day 2020, which this year falls on November 26. However, all malls resume operations from the day after Thanksgiving, Black Friday, which sees various retail venues offer discounted prices on a range of products.



a group of people standing in a room: People line up outside a store at the Mall of America on June 10 in Minnesota.


© Getty Images
People line up outside a store at the Mall of America on June 10 in Minnesota.

The History Of Black Friday And Cyber Monday

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

But customers can start shopping online ahead of Black Friday, as several major retailers, including Amazon, Best Buy, Walmart, and several others, have launched their sales early ahead of November 27.

Here, we look at the hours of operation at some of the country’s largest malls on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday.

Mall of America

Minnesota’s Mall of America, the country’s largest mall with more than 5.6 million square feet of retail space, is closed on Thanksgiving but will be open on Black Friday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time.

The Mall of America has issued several safety guidelines amid the ongoing pandemic, such as a mask mandate. “Guests are required to wear a face covering throughout their visits. Children under five years old are exempt.

“Beginning Nov. 21, in accordance with state requirements all indoor dining will be unavailable. During this time, many Mall restaurants and food court tenants will continue to offer food for takeout and delivery, but it cannot be consumed on property.

“Additionally, following the latest guidance of state government officials, and to keep everyone safe, all Mall of America attractions, including Nickelodeon Universe, will be closed temporarily,” the company stated.

American Dream

New Jersey’s American Dream mall is closed on Thanksgiving, including its retail and dining facilities as well as the Dreamworks Water Park, Nickelodeon Universe, Out of the World Blacklight Mini Golf, Angrybirds Not So Mini Golf Club and indoor ice skating rink venues.

Retail and dining areas will be reopened from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Black Friday. See the American Dream website for Black Friday opening times for the mall’s other venues.

The American Dream mall reopened its doors on October 1, following a seven-month closure due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Several precautionary measures are in place, including required face coverings and a 25 percent capacity limit.

Roosevelt Field Mall

The Roosevelt Field Mall in Garden City, New York is not open on Thanksgiving but will resume operations from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. local time on Black Friday.

The mall, owned by the Simon Property Group, reopened in July, after remaining closed for months since late March amid the ongoing outbreak. Customers are required to wear face coverings and maintain a social distance during their visit.

Back in late April, the Simon Property Group noted: “Our employees and security officers will actively remind and encourage shoppers to maintain the proper distance from fellow shoppers and workers, and refrain from shopping in groups. Tenants should do the same within their leased spaces,” in a memo on

Read more

Black Businesses Receive Tech Industry Push Ahead Of Holiday Shopping Bonanza

The Covid-19 pandemic has dealt Black-owned businesses a tough hand. Stifled by stay-at-home orders, on-again off-again store closures and stricter limits occupancy limits, many businesses are struggling to outlast the seemingly unending virus outbreak. 

Although they’ve rebounded slightly in recent months, Black-owned stores have experienced the greatest decline this year, plummeting from 1.1 million businesses in February to 640,000 in April—a 41% drop.

But spurred by a national movement to support Black businesses, which kicked off this summer, a new number of corporations are taking small steps to put the Black in Black Friday.

Black Friday online sales pulled in a record $7.4 billion in 2019— the second largest online shopping day ever and a 19.6% increase over the previous year—while the holiday season overall generated more than $72 billion in online sales, according to Adobe Analytics. Online sales for this Black Friday are projected to generate $10.3 billion.

The surge in digital spending over the holiday season and the heightened visibility that’s been awarded to small businesses through corporate sponsorships could have a considerable impact on Black businesses in particular, sustaining them through the a few more months of the pandemic.

Facebook, for one, launched its #BuyBlackFriday initiative and a corresponding toolkit and gift guide in October as part of a broader three-month campaign to buttress small businesses during the holiday season.

The gift guide features products from Black-owned businesses and was curated alongside the U.S. Black Chambers and several corporate partners. 

“Black-owned businesses have been hit especially hard by the pandemic, closing at twice the rate of other small businesses,” Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote in a blog post announcing the initiative. She added, “But we know that millions of people want to help.”

The campaign runs through Black Friday on November 27, a symbolic starting gun for the holiday shopping season.

More recently, Google partnered with Grammy-winning musician Wyclef Jean and the U.S. Black Chambers to promote its #BlackOwnedFriday campaign, an effort to make November 27 “Black-owned Friday” and galvanize shoppers to buy Black beyond the Thanksgiving weekend.

The tech giant has also showcased Black-owed businesses on its social platforms since mid-October and now allows users to find nearby stores that identify as Black-owned through its search engine.

“I’ve seen firsthand the strain and struggle that Black-owned businesses face,” Jean said in a statement. “For many of them, this holiday season will be critical to their survival.”

TikTok, the latest viral social media platform, threw its weight behind Black-owned businesses months after facing censorship allegations from Black creatives in June. Earlier this month, the video sharing platform, which has about 200 million monthly active users in the U.S., launched Support Black Businesses, a digital hub to amplify Black entrepreneurs. 

TikTok also announced #ShopBlack, an in-app campaign that allows users to create videos spotlighting their favorite Black-owned businesses or to share their experience as a Black entrepreneur.

As small businesses reel from the pandemic’s economic disruption, many

Read more

New York officials try to stop ‘huge’ Hasidic wedding from going ahead tonight

New York state officials scrambled to stop a massive wedding in a Hasidic community from taking place tonight in a small town an hour north of Manhattan. 

The state’s Health Department mandated that the wedding booked at the Yetev Lev synagogue in Kiryas Joel be canceled – unless it can be limited to 50 people in each of two reception buildings and that guests wear masks and socially distance, the Middletown Times Herald-Record reported. 

But by mid-afternoon it appeared that the wedding would go ahead, the Daily Beast reported. 

Unmasked, black-hatted men were seen walking in and out of the large synagogue, where preparations for the huge event were underway, according to the Daily Beast. White tarps from the top of the stairs to the floor blocked the view inside the venue. 

It’s unclear how many people were invited to the wedding and how many were expected to attend. DailyMail.com has contacted Yetev Lev synagogue for comment. 

New York's state Health Department ordered an ultra-Orthodox synagogue in Kiryas Joel to follow mask rules and limit capacity at a wedding planned for Monday within state guidelines - but preparations befitting a massive ceremony suggested that would not happen

New York’s state Health Department ordered an ultra-Orthodox synagogue in Kiryas Joel to follow mask rules and limit capacity at a wedding planned for Monday within state guidelines – but preparations befitting a massive ceremony suggested that would not happen

The synagogue in Kiryas Joel, a village of 26,000 that’s populated predominantly by ulta-Orthodox Jews of the Satmar sect, can accommodate thousands of people.    

The wedding organizers sent invitations out to guests. A previous wedding in the Hasidic community, held November 8 at the Yetev Lev temple in Williamsburg, Brooklyn with 7,000 guests, limited invitations to word of mouth in order to fly under the radar.

Lawrence Dressler, who was invited to the Kiryas Joel wedding, shared on his blog the text of the invitation he received for the wedding, which he expected to be ‘huge.’

‘I would like to invite our family, friends and followers to the wedding of my grandchild the great scholar the groom who is filled with Torah and the fear of G-d,’ the invitation began. 

The earlier wedding on November 8 drew the ire of Gov. Andrew Cuomo after photos and videos emerged of the wedding, which was planned in secret to flout state rules limiting capacity at indoor religious gatherings.

Maskless crowds crammed together in their thousands at an earlier indoor wedding within the Satmar community (pictured) - that one November 8 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Maskless crowds crammed together in their thousands at an earlier indoor wedding within the Satmar community (pictured) – that one November 8 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

The earlier Hasidic wedding, in Brooklyn, slipped under the radar of city officials as it crowded 7,000 maskless people into the Yetev Lev synagogue, in defiance of Governor Cuomo's coronavirus restrictions

The earlier Hasidic wedding, in Brooklyn, slipped under the radar of city officials as it crowded 7,000 maskless people into the Yetev Lev synagogue, in defiance of Governor Cuomo’s coronavirus restrictions

Blogger Lawrence Dressler (pictured) was invited to the Kiryas Joel wedding and shared the text of the invitation

Blogger Lawrence Dressler (pictured) was invited to the Kiryas Joel wedding and shared the text of the invitation

More than 7,000 people packed the nuptials, where men were seen dancing and singing and few wore masks. 

Satmar community newspaper Der Blatt later crowed over the successful subterfuge. 

At a news conference in New York City on Sunday, Cuomo blasted the synagogue for hosting the crowded wedding of Yoel Teitelbaum, grandson of Satmar Grand Rabbi Aaron Teitelman.

‘If that happened, it

Read more

Tyler Perry donates food, gift cards to 5,000 families ahead of Thanksgiving, leading to miles-long lines

Tyler Perry donated food and money to thousands of needy people in his community of Atlanta, Ga. ahead of Thanksgiving. 

The actor, writer and producer announced on Thursday that Tyler Perry Studios, his Atlanta-based film and TV hub, was going to be giving away non-perishable food items as well as $25 gift cards to the first 5,000 families in need who drove through. 

“We are excited to announce the #TPSGiving Food Giveaway event on Sunday, November 22nd from 8:00am to 12:00pm,” a tweet from the studio read. “During this drive-up event we will be distributing non-perishable food items and gift cards to people who are in need during this holiday season. See you there!”

TYLER PERRY’S LATEST DONATION AIMS TO ‘BRIDGE UNITY’ BETWEEN ATLANTA POLICE AND RESIDENTS

The event began at 8 a.m. local time and the studio said it was already out of food by 10 a.m. At one point, the line of people looking to take Perry up on his offer stretched for 5 miles south of downtown Atlanta. Fox 5 reporter Emilie Ikeda tweeted that people began lining up at 3 p.m. the previous day to ensure their spot. The line even caused some traffic back-ups on Langford Pkwy and I-20.

In an effort to keep things safe in light of the coronavirus pandemic, people were required to stay in their cars and wear masks while they received their food. Volunteers in protective equipment handed out the food and gift cards until there were no more to give. 

FORBES REVEALS HOW TYLER PERRY WENT FROM DIRT-POOR TO BILLIONAIRE, CHANGING SHOW BUSINESS FOREVER

This is far from the first time that Perry has been particularly generous with his local community. 

Tyler Perry donated food to 5,000 families in need in Atlanta, Ga.

Tyler Perry donated food to 5,000 families in need in Atlanta, Ga.
(Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images)

In April, he left $21,000 in tips to employees at a restaurant he’s fond of after they found themselves out of work due to the pandemic. He also paid for the groceries of elderly and high-risk shoppers at a local Kroger. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

Prior to deciding to help out amid the pandemic, he got into the holiday spirit in 2018 when he paid off more than $400,000 worth of layaways at a local Walmart ahead of Christmas. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The “Madea” creator said at the time that he knew people were going through “hard times” and were “struggling” but he said he was “grateful to be able to be in a position to do this.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source Article

Read more