Alice & Olivia Dropped Its First-Ever Casual Collection

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Since March, it seems like we’ve collectively been living in sweatpants. It makes sense, considering we’re stuck at home trying to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Between dealing with our kids and the house and our jobs, sweatpants or pajamas are really the only things we can muster the energy to put on these days. 

But let’s face it, sometimes we need a little boost in the fashion department. It’s no secret that you feel good when you look good, and no one knows that better than Stacey Bendet, founder and Creative Director of the popular women’s fashion company Alice & Olivia. That’s why she decided it was high time to launch the brand’s first-ever casual collection. 

“I launched sweatpants because 95 percent of the population was no longer wearing anything unless it had an elastic top,” Bendet told Parents. “And I’m always thinking about dressing women for every part of her life, and right now, her life is casual.”

Bendet’s BFF (and Parents contributor) Jenny Mollen is a huge fan of the collection and insists that the clothes are “totally worth it” despite the somewhat high price tag. 

“I have the most hideous pair of pajamas that I literally wore every single day in March,” she said. She was elated when Bendet sent her a pair of Alice & Olivia’s new joggers and knew right away they were something she was “going to put so many miles on.”

“I always pay attention to what my girlfriends need,” said Bendet. “And I felt like during quarantine, they were all saying that they needed cute sweatpants that they didn’t feel dumpy in.”

“I feel like a superhero in them, and they are so comfortable,” she said. Mollen is also a fan of the Tokyo Joggers, which she describes as a “dress-up jogger with more high-tech fabric.” 

Bendet also created a series of sweaters and sweatshirts with positive sayings for the new collection as a “little reminder that you’re not doing so bad.” Our personal fave? It has to be the Denver Round Hem Sweatshirt with the phrase “If you are reading this you are too close” emblazoned across the front.

You can shop the entire Alice & Olivia Casual Collection here, or take a look at some of our favorite picks below. With the holidays approaching, now is the perfect time to shop for a (cute) cause. 

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Fashion Fave Alice McCall Has Gone Into Voluntary Administration

Luxe fashion label alice McCALL has sadly gone into voluntary administration, becoming the latest Aussie retailer to fall victim to COVID-19.

In a statement obtained by 9News, fashion designer Alice McCall confirmed she had made the decision to “edit down” her business, with hopes to build a more sustainable business model for the future.

“Due to the unprecedented effects that COVID-19 has had on our economy, as well as some unsustainable bricks and mortar rental obligations, I have had to make necessary decision to edit down my business,” McCall said.

Insolvency firm, SV Partners, has stepped in to help recover the business. While the company is still crunching the numbers, it did warn us to expect a number of store closures and redundancies.

“These steps have not been taken lightly, but have been necessary to give the company the best chance of survival whilst retaining a large number of its team and providing a return to its creditors,” the firm said.

While the future is unknown for alice McCall’s brick and mortar stores, the label’s online business will continue as normal.

The label is still set to launch a capsule collection with Cotton On Kids this Friday, November 13.

This is, unfortunately, just the latest notable Aussie brand to have collapsed during this terribly awful year.

In August, denim label G-Star Australia announced it would close after failing to find a buyer who could pull them out of voluntary administration.

Stationary goods Kikki.K was also placed into voluntary administration in March, but it was later saved (!!!) by an American stationary company.

Erin Condren Design managed to save 30 stores and 250 jobs under the restructured business. However, 35 stores were still shut and around 200 jobs were lost.

Iconic Sydney fashion retailer Tuchuzy also broke the administration curse after announcing it had “regained control” of the company in July of this year.

Daria Sakic, who founded Tuchuzy in 1995, thanked the unwavering love from customers, team, and suppliers for their unyielding support.

Hopefully the same can be said for alice McCALL at some point in the near future.

More Good Stuff From PEDESTRIAN.TV

Image:
Instagram / @alicemccall

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Australian fashion label Alice McCall enters voluntary administration

Australian fashion label Alice McCall has entered voluntary administration, blaming the coronavirus pandemic for its financial struggles.

The women’s fashion brand named after the designer confirmed on Monday it had appointed a Sydney-based insolvency firm as administrator, flagging store closures are likely to occur.

It is understood the company’s 14 stores are at threat of closing.

Stores and the company’s website will trade under normal conditions until the administrator completes further measures.

Administrator SV Partners said: “Unfortunately, that will require the closure of a number of its stores and the redundancy of some employees.”

In a statement, Ms McCall blamed the economic woes of the pandemic for the failure of her 17-year-old business.

“It is with a heavy heart that due to the unprecedented effects that COVID-19 has had on our economy, as well as some unsustainable bricks and mortar rental obligations, I have had to make a necessary decision to edit down my business, with the objective of building a more sustainable business model for the future,” she said.

“There is nothing that fuels me more than a customer sharing their experience of a meaningful memory that they have lived while wearing an ‘Alice’ garment. This truly is what motivates me to do what I do.”

Alice McCall had recently launched a dedicated Chinese website following growing demand in the major economy.

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Australian fashion brand Alice McCall goes into voluntary administration

Australian fashion brand Alice McCall has gone bust as the company wrangled with COVID-19 financial woes.

The designer joins several other retail businesses to enter voluntary administration in the past year, including Seafolly , Kikki K, Jeanswest and Bardot. Seafolly, however, was saved from collapse by its former owner after the iconic swimwear company went into administration.

Ms McCall confirmed the business went into voluntary administration on Monday, with Sydney-based insolvency firm SVPartners appointed to handle the liquidation.

This will likely result in the closure of several of the brand’s 14 stores across Australia.

Meanwhile, the brand’s bricks-and-mortar stores and online shop are still currently trading as per normal.

RELATED: Iconic Aussie bikini brand collapses

Ms McCall said in a statement it was with a “heavy heart” that the company called in administrators.

“Due to the unprecedented effects that COVID-19 has had on our economy, as well as some unsustainable bricks and mortar rental obligations, I have had to make a necessary decision to edit down my business, with the objective of building a more sustainable business model for the future,” she said.

The designer thanked her staff and customers. “There is nothing that fuels me more than a customer sharing their experience of a meaningful memory that they have lived while wearing an ‘Alice’ garment,” she said. “This truly is what motivates me to do what I do.”

SVPartners’ Ian Purchas said a number of stores will be forced to closed and some of its workers will lose their jobs as the company’s revenue was “severely impacted”.

“Unfortunately that will require the closure of a number of its stores, and the redundancy of some employees,” The Age reported he said.

The brand launched at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia in 2004.

In 2009, Ms McCall launched a complementary online store and the business expanded internationally, including a strong following in China.

The global expansion included launching a dedicated e-commerce site in China to complement the bricks-and-mortar store that opened in the country.

McCall was the first Australian brand to launch a physical store in China, but the store has since closed.

This follows a string of other businesses in the fashion industry going under amid the crushing toll of the pandemic.

BUSINESSES GONE BUST IN 2020

Iconic Aussie bikini brand Seafolly collapsed into liquidation in the middle of this year.

In March, rival swimwear brand Tigerlily also collapsed into voluntary administration, blaming the economic downturn from COVID-19.

Other retailers to collapse this year include Harris Scarfe, Jeanswest, Ishka, Bardot, Kikki K, Colette by Colette Hayman and Bardot.

The new year brought in news that department store Harris Scarfe was set to shut 21 stores across five states over the course of just one month in January after the retailer was placed into receivership in December 2019.

Just days later, McWilliam’s Wines – the country’s sixth-largest wine company that has been run by the same family for more than 140 years – announced it had also appointed voluntary administrators.

Then it

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