Ask Amy: Adoption complicates clan’s wedding plans

Dear Amy: My biological great-aunt and uncle adopted me when I was 2 years old. I am now 20, and I’m planning my wedding. My adoptive parents are my world, and I couldn’t be more grateful to them.

I have a very close relationship with my mom, and plan on including her in my wedding, just as anyone normally would.

Because it was an open adoption and my adoptive parents are my great-aunt and uncle, I do know my biological mom.

She and I have more of a friendly bond than a mother/daughter bond. I am getting married next year, and I want to include her somehow, but my adoptive mom gets jealous and hurt about certain things when it comes to including her.

How can I incorporate my biological mom, but not hurt my adoptive mom’s feelings?

Also, should I give my biological mom a corsage to wear?

I’m not sure what to do.

— Unsure Bride

Dear Unsure: This is tricky, because all of your parents are also related to one another (I take it that one of your biological parents would be your parents’ niece or nephew). There is no doubt a lot of challenging history there, before and after your birth and adoption.

In my opinion, you should invite your biological mother to the wedding, and give her a seat in the front row, along with other family members. Yes, it would be nice for you to give her a corsage.

Weddings are highly charged events; feelings and insecurities are heightened in anticipation. Communicate with your parents honestly and as soon as possible, letting them know what your plans are, giving them time to adjust.

Consider having both of your (adoptive) parents — not just your dad — walk you down the aisle to formally present you to your prospective spouse. They deserve that honor.

Understand that your mom might feel threatened, jealous, and upset, no matter what plan you present. Affirm her feelings, saying: “I know this is hard, but there is no question in my mind about who my ‘real’ parents are — you two! I hope you can keep that in mind and help me by being friendly to my biological mom during the events. It’s hard on me, too, but I’m trying to do the right thing.”

Dear Amy: “Carrie” and I met at work a few years ago.

She’s well-known, but for some reason, has no “real” friends. As I got to know her better, I realized that she is needy and selfish, the kind of person who has no trouble asking for things, but who doesn’t reciprocate.

When we hung out, it was always at the location she wanted. I’d have to take pictures of her for her Instagram (dozens at a time, in different locations!) and she would always keep me waiting.

Over the last two years, I’ve been trying to ice her out, but she has not taken the hint, confronting me when I haven’t included her in

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Ask Amy: Adopted bride mulls biological mom’s place at wedding

Dear Amy: My biological great-aunt and uncle adopted me when I was 2 years old. I am now 20, and I’m planning my wedding. My adoptive parents are my world, and I couldn’t be more grateful to them.

I have a very close relationship with my mom, and plan on including her in my wedding, just as anyone normally would.

Because it was an open adoption and my adoptive parents are my great-aunt and uncle, I do know my biological mom.

She and I have more of a friendly bond than a mother/daughter bond. I am getting married next year, and I want to include her somehow, but my adoptive mom gets jealous and hurt about certain things when it comes to including her.

How can I incorporate my biological mom, but not hurt my adoptive mom’s feelings?

Also, should I give my biological mom a corsage to wear?

I’m not sure what to do.

— Unsure Bride

Dear Unsure: This is tricky, because all of your parents are also related to one another (I take it that one of your biological parents would be your parents’ niece or nephew). There is no doubt a lot of challenging history there, before and after your birth and adoption.

In my opinion, you should invite your biological mother to the wedding, and give her a seat in the front row, along with other family members. Yes, it would be nice for you to give her a corsage.

Weddings are highly charged events; feelings and insecurities are heightened in anticipation. Communicate with your parents honestly and as soon as possible, letting them know what your plans are, giving them time to adjust.

Consider having both of your (adoptive) parents — not just your dad — walk you down the aisle to formally present you to your prospective spouse. They deserve that honor.

Understand that your mom might feel threatened, jealous, and upset, no matter what plan you present. Affirm her feelings, saying: “I know this is hard, but there is no question in my mind about who my ‘real’ parents are — you two! I hope you can keep that in mind and help me by being friendly to my biological mom during the events. It’s hard on me, too, but I’m trying to do the right thing.”

Dear Amy: “Carrie” and I met at work a few years ago.

She’s well-known, but for some reason, has no “real” friends. As I got to know her better, I realized that she is needy and selfish, the kind of person who has no trouble asking for things, but who doesn’t reciprocate.

When we hung out, it was always at the location she wanted. I’d have to take pictures of her for her Instagram (dozens at a time, in different locations!) and she would always keep me waiting.

Over the last two years, I’ve been trying to ice her out, but she has not taken the hint, confronting me when I haven’t included her in

Read more

Now streaming: Amy Adams in ‘Hillbilly Elegy,’ a new ‘Black Beauty,’ holiday shows and more

Here’s what’s new on Video on Demand, Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu and other services.

Top streams of the week

Hillbilly Elegy” (2020, R), based on the bestselling memoir by J.D. Vance, stars Gabriel Basso as a Yale law student drawn back to Northern Kentucky to deal with his meth-addict mother (Amy Adams) and confront the dead-end life he escaped. Haley Bennett, Freida Pinto and Glenn Close co-star and Ron Howard directs. (Netflix)

Paul Bettany is “Uncle Frank” (2020, R) in Alan Ball’s road movie about a closeted gay literature professor in 1969 New York who reluctantly returns to his South Carolina home with his niece (Sophia Lillis) for a family funeral. (Amazon Prime)

Charlize Theron plays Megyn Kelly and Nicole Kidman is Gretchen Carlson in “Bombshell“ (2019, R), based on the true story of a scandal at Fox News. Margot Robbie and John Lithgow co-star in the film that won an Oscar for makeup and hairstyling. (Amazon Video and Hulu)

Also based on a true story, contemporary war thriller “Mosul” (2019, not rated, with subtitles) follows an Iraqi SWAT team that breaks all the rules to drive ISIS out of their city. (Netflix)

Mackenzie Foy is the spirited teenage girl who bonds with a wild horse (voiced by Kate Winslet) in the new adaptation of “Black Beauty” (2020, TV-PG). (Disney+)

Kaley Cuoco is “The Flight Attendant” (TV-MA) in the eight-episode comic murder mystery. Three episodes are available; new episodes arrive each Thursday. (HBO Max)

Saved by the Bell: Season 1” (TV-14) updates the 1990s high school sitcom with original stars Elizabeth Berkley, Mario Lopez and Mark-Paul Gosselaar as adults with their own kids. Three episodes are available; new episodes each Tuesday. (Peacock)

Holiday trimmings

Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square” (2020, not rated) is a holiday musical with Christine Baranski as a Scrooge-like cynic and Parton (who also produced and wrote 14 original songs) as an angel named Angel. (Netflix)

The Christmas Chronicles: Part Two” (2020, TV-PG), a sequel to the 2018 adventure directed by Chris Columbus, features Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus joining a pair of kids to (what else?) save Christmas. (Netflix)

The romantic comedy “Happiest Season” (2020, PG-13) stars Kristen Stewart as a woman at her girlfriend’s (Mackenzie Davis) family Christmas dinner who discovers she hasn’t come out to her parents. (Hulu)

Pay-Per-View / Video on Demand

Diane Lane and Kevin Costner play grandparents who, after the death of their son, go on a mission to rescue their grandson from a criminal family in “Let Him Go” (2020, R).

Stardust” (2020, not rated) stars Johnny Flynn as young David Bowie at the beginning of his career.

Netflix

True stories: “Shawn Mendes: In Wonder” (2020, not rated) profiles the top-selling singer-songwriter on his world tour and “Dance Dreams: Hot Chocolate Nutcracker” (2020) goes behind

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Amy Williams finds ‘silver lining’ as COVID, injuries disrupt practice for Husker women | Women’s Basketball



Amy Williams finds 'silver lining' as COVID, injuries disrupt practice for Husker women

“Because of injuries and COVID interruptions, our kids haven’t had near enough time on the court together to learn each other’s strengths and weaknesses or be where we would like to be in a normal year,” NU coach Amy Williams said.




LINCOLN — Count the women’s basketball team among the Husker programs who have been hit by the coronavirus.

“We’ve definitely been affected,” NU coach Amy Williams said Wednesday in an interview with The World-Herald. She declined to say who had contracted the virus or how many had it aside from standout center Kate Cain, who announced in the spring she got COVID and recovered from it.

Injuries, including some that lingered from years past, have cut into NU’s practice roster, as well. The frontcourt — Cain, Isabelle Bourne, Bella Cravens and Annika Stewart — has been relatively intact for training camp. The backcourt, where Nebraska is looking for players to complement junior captain Sam Haiby, has been a constant shuffle.



Eastern Washington transfer Bella Cravens gets waiver to play for Huskers this season

Bourne, the rare sophomore captain, said Wednesday the practice roster got as small as six recently.

“COVID is kind of crazy now in the U.S.,” said Bourne, an Australian who spent most of her summer back home in quarantine and government-mandated lockdown, shooting hoops in her backyard. “You can’t help when someone gets it on the team. It’s going to happen. Just being able to accept that and push those who practice to work hard will make our team better.”

So the Huskers — who don’t yet know their Big Ten schedule, and probably won’t until Friday — are unlikely to start their season next week, as planned. NU has three nonconference games scheduled — one is at Creighton — and may not add any more. Williams said her team will play 20 Big Ten games, and none of her league peers has more than 25 games at this point on their schedule.

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Jimmy Kimmel Calls White House’s Amy Coney Barrett Confirmation Celebration Its “Second Red Wedding”

Hours after the Supreme Court confirmed judge Amy Coney Barrett to take the place vacated by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, GOP figures and the Trump administration celebrated by gathering at the White House. But with COVID-19 having infected numerous White House staff members, the first lady, her son and President Donald Trump, Jimmy Kimmel says the Monday night gathering may be positive in more ways than one.

“This is like if in Game of Thrones – the Starks decided to have a second Red Wedding,” he said likening the political assembly to the gory GOT scene.

Kimmel’s comment about the gathering comes after Dr. Anthony Fauci dubbed the crowded Barrett nomination event a “super-spreader event.” Since the late September happening, at least 11 people including Trump tested positive for coronavirus.

During his opening monologue, Kimmel added that the Monday celebration isn’t the only gathering that may result in new cases of COVID-19, slamming Trump and his multiple rallies in Michigan, Wisconsin and Nebraska. At the rallies, supporters can be seen sitting or standing close to each other and often not wearing face coverings.

The late night host continued to criticize Trump for his lack of caution, concern and his repeated idea of “rounding the corner” on the viral infection.

After a video montage of failed and dangerous vehicular turns and statistics proving Trump’s comments incorrect, Kimmel said it might be time for the president to retire the phrase.

“We’ve rounded so many corners we’re about to throw up.”

Watch the Jimmy Kimmel Live segment above.

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Meet the women who preceded Amy Coney Barrett on the US Supreme Court

In a 52-48 vote on Monday night, Amy Coney Barrett became the fifth woman to be confirmed to the United States Supreme Court.

Coney Barrett, a 48-year-old U.S. Court of Appeals judge nominated by President Donald Trump, fills the seat left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a staunch liberal and feminist icon who died Sept. 18.

Coney Barrett will join two other women, Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, on the bench. The first woman confirmed to the Supreme Court, former Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, retired in 2006.

Earlier this year, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of ratification of the 19th Amendment, which secured the right to vote for American women, USA TODAY released Women of the Century, a comprehensive look at women from around the U.S. who made an impact on their community and country over the past 100 years.

Today, we’re republishing the profiles of the women who have served on the Supreme Court, breaking some of the strongest barriers as they ascended to the highest court in the land. 

Sandra Day O’Connor

First woman named to the U.S. Supreme Court

(1930-  )

SANDRA DAY OCONNOR

SANDRA DAY OCONNOR
PHOTO: Paul Morse for USA TODAY NETWORK, ILLUSTRATION: USA TODAY NETWORK

Sandra Day O’Connor gained international recognition as the first woman to serve as a  U.S. Supreme Court justice.

Appointed by Republican President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she held a seat on the nation’s highest court for nearly 25 years. The court grew more conservative during her tenure, and O’Connor frequently became the key vote that determined important cases.

O’Connor was born in El Paso, but she is Arizonan through and through. Raised on the dusty, isolated Lazy B Ranch in southeastern Arizona, she was a pioneer all her life.

She enrolled at Stanford University at age 16 and graduated from law school at 22.

O’Connor was Arizona’s first woman to serve as Senate majority leader, and then became a trial and appeals court judge in the state.

After her retirement from the Supreme Court in 2006, she continued to advocate for civics education in the U.S. and judicial independence across the globe.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

U.S. Supreme Court justice

(1933-2020)

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Photo: H. Darr Beiser, USA TODAY, Illustration: USA TODAY Network

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was appointed as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court by Democratic President Bill Clinton; she took the oath of office on Aug 10, 1993, and remained on the bench until she died Sept. 18. A teacher, mother, wife and champion for women’s rights, she was the second of only four women confirmed to the court. 

Ruth Joan Bader was born in Brooklyn in 1933. She graduated first in her class from Cornell University and was the first woman on the Harvard Law Review before transferring to Columbia Law School, where she again made law review and graduated first in her class. Ginsburg litigated sex discrimination cases for the American Civil Liberties Union and was instrumental in creating its Women’s Rights project in 1972.  

Before

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Women’s groups slam Amy Coney Barrett confirmation as ‘malicious theft’ of Supreme Court vacancy

Women’s groups on Monday slammed Senate Republicans for confirming President Trump’s nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, saying they participated in a “malicious theft” of a vacancy on the high court, and called the confirmation process “an illegitimate power grab.”

The Senate voted to confirm Barrett to the vacancy on the high court left by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Monday. The Senate voted 52-48 on Barrett’s nomination, marking President Trump’s third Supreme Court justice of his administration. The last president to nominate three new justices to the Supreme Court was Ronald Reagan.

But Planned Parenthood slammed the confirmation process, and Barrett, as a “threat” to women’s health and rights.

“In the midst of a global health crisis, with more than 225,000 dead in this country, Mitch McConnell prioritized this sham process over passing desperately needed COVID relief — and he openly admitted it,” Planned Parenthood Action president Alexis McGill Johnson said in a statement after the vote. “Senate majority leadership has compromised the safety and well-being of Americans by ignoring this pandemic, and they’ve done it to confirm a Supreme Court justice who will be an active threat to our health and rights.”

Johnson went on to say that this “is a lifetime position, and this partisan, malicious theft of the people’s seat will be felt for generations to come.”

“For decades, this change in the court will threaten our civil rights, access to health care, freedom to marry, legal protections from discrimination, and reproductive health and rights,” Johnson continued.

Johnson, though, said that Barrett’s confirmation to the high court is over, but looked ahead to next week’s presidential election.

“We are far from defeated,” Johnson said. “This phony confirmation process is over but this election is not. We deserve leaders who respect our wishes and who champion our health and rights — and we’re going to make absolutely sure these senators and Donald Trump know that.”

Planned Parenthood provides patients access to a wide range of health and reproductive health services, including birth control and abortions.

Meanwhile, EMILY’s List, a PAC that supports Democratic women running for office on abortion rights platforms, slammed the confirmation of Barrett just week’s before Election Day an “illegitimate power grab.”

“That’s what we just witnessed from Senate Republicans so that they can overturn the Affordable Care Act, undermine reproductive freedom, and jeopardize our fundamental rights,” EMILY’s List tweeted shortly after Barrett was confirmed to the high court Monday night.

Barrett, a devout Catholic, has been criticized by women’s groups and those on the left for her views on abortion, but the now-Supreme Court Justice during her confirmation hearing earlier this month declined to respond to questions about abortion cases before the high court, saying she “cannot pre-commit” while saying she has “no agenda.”

Barrett simply stated that she will “obey all the rules” and will apply “all factors” relating to precedent and “reliance and workability.”

“All the standard factors,” Barrett explained. “And I promise to do that

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Sarah Sanders: ‘Vicious’ attacks on Amy Coney Barrett show what Democrats think of women

This is a rush transcript from “Hannity” September 22, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, FOX NEWS HOST:  All right. Tucker Carlson, thank you. Great show as always. 

Welcome to HANNITY. 

We begin with the FOX News alert. 

The president now still holding a huge rally in the important battleground state of Pennsylvania, the first of two major campaign events this week in the state.

Let’s dip in as the president seems like he’s closing out now.

DONALD TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:  — where now we get the same prices, all these nations that are paying a tiny fraction, which should have been instituted a long time ago and the drug companies are going after me with those ads, oh, it’s terrible, it’s terrible. 

You know why? Just every time you see an ad from the drug company — they got plenty of money, that’s why nobody ever fights them. Anytime you see an ad from a drug company, just remember one thing, your drug prices are coming down. That’s what it means. That’s what it means.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

We will strongly protect Medicare and Social Security and we will always protect patients. We will protect every single patient.

America will land, by the way, the first woman on the moon, and the United States will be the first nation to land an astronaut on Mars. 

You know, NASA was an absolute disaster. Grass was growing through the fairways, too. They had fairways. That’s about all they used with the fairway. 

And now we have something right through the runways, the landing strips was all grass-infested, it was all weed-infested. And now, it’s the number one space center in the world by far. It was a closed-up mess. 

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And we have rich guys sending up rockets, Elon and others, they send up rockets and we say, let them keep going, let them keep spending money on these rockets. They love rockets. 

We will stop the radical indoctrination of our students and restore patriotic education to (INAUDIBLE). 

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

We will teach our children to love our country, honor our history and always respect our great American flag.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And we will live by the timeless words in our national motto — in God we trust.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

For years, you had a president who apologized for America, now you have a president who is standing up for America and standing up for the people of Pennsylvania like nobody has ever stood up before.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

So, get your friends, get your family, get your neighbors and your co- workers, and get out and vote.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And early voting — if you didn’t know it, has already begun, and watch it and watch those fake ballots. You got to go out and turn them in. If they –
– you see somebody cheating, you got to turn them

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Ask Amy: Best friend invited me, but not my fiance or children, to wedding

Dear Amy: In January, my best friend of 30 years and I had a falling out, this was not the first one we’ve had over the years.

I sent texts, checking on her health during the pandemic, with no response. Finally, two weeks ago, she contacted me.

She’s getting married and she said she couldn’t decide whether to invite me.

I told her that either way I would understand; it’s her day, not mine.

I didn’t hear back.

She messaged me tonight, asking if I’d like to attend her wedding, adding that I’m invited, but not my fiance or my children.

I’ve never felt comfortable around her other friends, as she behaves very differently around them. (This behavior is what has caused us to fall out multiple times.)

Now I don’t know whether I should attend. On the one hand, I’d like to be there, because we’ve known each other since the first grade. I love her family, but I’m worried I’ll receive the same treatment from her and her friends that I have experienced before.

NOT going might be better than going. I wouldn’t want to go and then regret it.

However, I appreciate that she got over her pride and invited me.

What do I do? What should I say?

I don’t want to hurt her, but I also feel like after the last falling-out, we’ll never be close again.

— AB in Illinois

Dear AB: Your friend has been open about her reluctance to have you attend her wedding. Her reluctance has been underscored by the ungracious way she extended the invitation, and the parameters she has imposed.

Additionally, you don’t really want to go.

I’d call that a mutual parting of the ways.

You do not need to bring the hammer down on this friendship, because it is quite obviously waning. You could respond, “I’m so happy for you; I know this will be a wonderful celebration. I appreciate the invitation, but unfortunately, I won’t be able to make it. I’ll be thinking of you on the big day.”

Dear Amy: One of my daughters got married last November.

My other daughter is getting married this November.

Can I wear the same dress to this wedding that I wore to last year’s wedding?

— MOB X 2

Dear MOB: You can wear whatever you want to wear, as long as you feel good about how you look.

However, before wearing the same dress to this daughter’s wedding, you should carefully think it through and talk it over with the prospective bride.

Weddings last for part of a day, but the wedding photos last forever. Try to envision how you would perceive the pictures of each daughter’s wedding over time. Would you feel at all self-conscious — after the fact — about essentially looking exactly the same in the two sets of photos, taken at different occasions, a year apart?

You might be able to alter your look by adding a shawl or a dressy coat over

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Ask Amy: Long-term friendship comes to crossroads over wedding invite

Dear Amy: In January, my best friend of 30 years and I had a falling out, this was not the first one we’ve had over the years.

I sent texts, checking on her health during the pandemic, with no response. Finally, two weeks ago, she contacted me.

She’s getting married and she said she couldn’t decide whether to invite me. I told her that either way I would understand; it’s her day, not mine. I didn’t hear back.

She messaged me tonight, asking if I’d like to attend her wedding, adding that I’m invited, but not my fiance or my children.

I’ve never felt comfortable around her other friends, as she behaves very differently around them. (This behavior is what has caused us to fall out multiple times.)

Now I don’t know whether I should attend. On the one hand, I’d like to be there, because we’ve known each other since the first grade. I love her family, but I’m worried I’ll receive the same treatment from her and her friends that I have experienced before.

NOT going might be better than going. I wouldn’t want to go and then regret it.

However, I appreciate that she got over her pride and invited me.

What do I do? What should I say?

I don’t want to hurt her, but I also feel like after the last falling-out, we’ll never be close again.

— AB in Illinois

Dear AB: Your friend has been open about her reluctance to have you attend her wedding. Her reluctance has been underscored by the ungracious way she extended the invitation, and the parameters she has imposed.

Additionally, you don’t really want to go.

I’d call that a mutual parting of the ways.

You do not need to bring the hammer down on this friendship, because it is quite obviously waning. You could respond, “I’m so happy for you; I know this will be a wonderful celebration. I appreciate the invitation, but unfortunately, I won’t be able to make it. I’ll be thinking of you on the big day.”

Dear Amy: One of my daughters got married last November.

My other daughter is getting married this November.

Can I wear the same dress to this wedding that I wore to last year’s wedding?

— MOB X 2

Dear MOB: You can wear whatever you want to wear, as long as you feel good about how you look.

However, before wearing the same dress to this daughter’s wedding, you should carefully think it through and talk it over with the prospective bride.

Weddings last for part of a day, but the wedding photos last forever. Try to envision how you would perceive the pictures of each daughter’s wedding over time. Would you feel at all self-conscious — after the fact — about essentially looking exactly the same in the two sets of photos, taken at different occasions, a year apart?

You might be able to alter your look by adding a shawl or a dressy coat over

Read more