Meet the 5 women appointed to President-elect Joe Biden’s White House senior staff

From the beginning of his campaign, President-elect Joe Biden has pledged to have a diverse staff, stating in his in Delaware that “from the outset I wanted a campaign that represented America, and I think we did that. Now that’s what I want the administration to look like.”



Jen O'Malley Dillon standing in front of a building: Jen O'Malley Dillon is the Biden Campaign Manager.


© Provided by CNBC
Jen O’Malley Dillon is the Biden Campaign Manager.

Following through on his promise, Biden has developed a transition team that consists of 46% people of color and 52% women, according to data obtained by CNN. When looking specifically at his senior staff, people of color make up 41% of those leaders and women make up 53%.

On Tuesday, Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris tweeted out who will be part of their senior White House staff. Showing a diverse group of nine individuals, including four men and five women, Biden and Harris reminded the public again of their “commitment to building an administration that looks like America.”

From Biden’s deputy chief of staff to his director of oval office operations, meet the five high-ranking women who will be part of the Biden-Harris White House team.

Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, Deputy Chief of Staff

As Biden-Harris’ campaign manager, Jennifer O’Malley Dillon was the first woman to lead a successful Democratic presidential campaign.

She joined Biden’s campaign in March 2020, and was immediately forced to run operations remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic. Prior to Biden’s campaign, the mom of three worked as the campaign manager for Beto O’Rourke’s presidential campaign and she served as deputy campaign manager for President Obama’s 2012 re-election. A graduate of Tufts University, O’Malley Dillon will now serve as Biden’s deputy chief of staff, making this her first White House position.

Dana Remus, White House Counsel

Dana Remus, who served as general counsel to the Biden-Harris campaign, will now serve as Biden’s White House Counsel.

A graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School, Remus previously worked as general counsel for the Obama Foundation and served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy counsel for ethics during the Obama-Biden administration. Prior to her work in the Obama-Biden administration, Remus was a law professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law. She also worked as a clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr. and Judge Anthony J. Scirica of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, and she was an associate at the Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP law firm in New York.

In 2018, former president Barack Obama officiated her wedding to Brett Holmgren, who was a national security aide in the Obama White House, according to The New York Times.



Julissa Reynoso sitting at a table with a vase of flowers: United States Ambassador to Uruguay, Julissa Reynoso speaks onstage at Variety's Power of Women New York presented by Lifetime at Cipriani 42nd Street on April 24, 2015 in New York City.


© Provided by CNBC
United States Ambassador to Uruguay, Julissa Reynoso speaks onstage at Variety’s Power of Women New York presented by Lifetime at Cipriani 42nd Street on April 24, 2015 in New York City.

Julissa Reynoso Pantaleon, Chief of Staff to Dr. Jill Biden

Julissa Reynoso Pantaleon, a partner at the law firm Winston

Read more

Biden’s first staff appointments include five women and four people of color

Joe Biden, the US president-elect, made another sharp break from Donald Trump on Tuesday by naming a White House senior staff that “looks like America”, including several women and people of colour.



Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP

Related: Trump Pennsylvania court hearing due as Biden sharpens criticism of concession refusal – live updates

Trump has been criticised for running the most white and male administration since Ronald Reagan. There are currently four women and 19 men in cabinet or cabinet-level positions. Picks for the federal judiciary are also dominated by white men.



In a statement, Joe Biden said: ‘America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives.’


© Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP
In a statement, Joe Biden said: ‘America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives.’

But Biden and Kamala Harris, who will be the first female and first Black vice-president, have promised to build a team to reflect shifting demographics. Tuesday’s first wave of appointments included five women and four people of colour.

Jen O’Malley Dillon will be White House deputy chief of staff. The 44-year-old, who as campaign manager was the first woman to lead a winning Democratic presidential bid, will work under Ron Klain, anointed chief of staff last week.

Cedric Richmond, a national co-chair of Biden’s campaign and former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, will quit the House of Representatives to join as a senior adviser and director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

Dana Remus, the campaign’s top lawyer, will be senior counsel to the president. Longtime advisers Mike Donilon and Steve Ricchetti will be senior adviser and counsellor to the president respectively.

Julie Chavez Rodriguez, one of Biden’s deputy campaign managers and the granddaughter of the farmworker union leader César Chávez, will be director of the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs. Annie Tomasini, currently Biden’s traveling chief of staff, will be director of Oval Office operations.

In a statement, Biden’s transition team said: “These diverse, experienced, and talented individuals demonstrate President-elect Biden’s commitment to building an administration that looks like America.”

It also quoted Biden as saying: “America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives and a shared commitment to tackling these challenges and emerging on the other side a stronger, more united nation.”

The appointments reward many of the advisers who helped Biden beat Trump in the 3 November election. Biden won the national popular vote by at least 5.6m votes, or 3.6 points, and in the state-by-state electoral college secured 306 votes to 232.

Video: Sen. Loeffler responds to ‘radical’ Warnock’s call for more debates (FOX News)

Sen. Loeffler responds to ‘radical’ Warnock’s call for more debates

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The announcement also reflected Biden’s determination to press ahead with a transition despite Trump’s increasingly tenuous effort to reverse the election.

The former vice-president was due to discuss national security threats on Tuesday with his own advisers, rather than government officials, as the Trump administration has blocked him from receiving the classified briefings normally accorded to a president-elect.

Emily Murphy, the general services administrator, has not

Read more

Biden’s first staff appointments include five women and four people of color | US news

Joe Biden, the US president-elect, made another sharp break from Donald Trump on Tuesday by naming a White House senior staff that “looks like America”, including several women and people of colour.

Trump has been criticised for running the most white and male administration since Ronald Reagan. There are currently four women and 19 men in cabinet or cabinet-level positions. Picks for the federal judiciary are also dominated by white men.

But Biden and Kamala Harris, who will be the first female and first Black vice-president, have promised to build a team to reflect shifting demographics. Tuesday’s first wave of appointments included five women and four people of colour.

Jen O’Malley Dillon will be White House deputy chief of staff. The 44-year-old, who as campaign manager was the first woman to lead a winning Democratic presidential bid, will work under Ron Klain, anointed chief of staff last week.

Cedric Richmond, a national co-chair of Biden’s campaign and former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, will quit the House of Representatives to join as a senior adviser and director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

Dana Remus, the campaign’s top lawyer, will be senior counsel to the president. Longtime advisers Mike Donilon and Steve Ricchetti will be senior adviser and counsellor to the president respectively.

Julie Chavez Rodriguez, one of Biden’s deputy campaign managers and the granddaughter of the farmworker union leader César Chávez, will be director of the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs. Annie Tomasini, currently Biden’s traveling chief of staff, will be director of Oval Office operations.

In a statement, Biden’s transition team said: “These diverse, experienced, and talented individuals demonstrate President-elect Biden’s commitment to building an administration that looks like America.”

It also quoted Biden as saying: “America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives and a shared commitment to tackling these challenges and emerging on the other side a stronger, more united nation.”

The appointments reward many of the advisers who helped Biden beat Trump in the 3 November election. Biden won the national popular vote by at least 5.6m votes, or 3.6 points, and in the state-by-state electoral college secured 306 votes to 232.

The announcement also reflected Biden’s determination to press ahead with a transition despite Trump’s increasingly tenuous effort to reverse the election.

The former vice-president was due to discuss national security threats on Tuesday with his own advisers, rather than government officials, as the Trump administration has blocked him from receiving the classified briefings normally accorded to a president-elect.

Emily Murphy, the general services administrator, has not yet recognised Biden as the “apparent winner”, which is needed to release funding and office space.

Seeking to project calm, Biden told reporters on Monday: “I find this more embarrassing for the country, than debilitating for my ability to get started.”

But he expressed frustration over the impact on his attempt to fight the coronavirus pandemic: “More people may die if we don’t coordinate … If we have to wait to 20

Read more

Women crucial to Biden’s win, even as gender gap held steady

Ask Virginia voter Mary Hayes why Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump, and she does not hesitate.

“We showed America that suburban women are diverse, and are a beautiful collection of ethnicity, race, marital status, occupations and many other categories,” Hayes says. “Suburban women mobilized, determined to remove Trump from office.” And, she says, they succeeded.

So in 2020, the year women celebrated the centennial of the 19th Amendment guaranteeing their right to vote, many had expected — and some polls suggested — a dramatic repudiation of Trump with a widened gender gap. The results were a bit more complicated.

Hayes is correct that women were crucial to Biden’s victory — simply stated, if only men had voted, Trump would have won. Black women and suburban women, in particular, proved to be pillars of Biden’s coalition. But the election also delivered a reminder of Republicans’ strength with other groups of women.

Trump had a modest advantage among white women, and a much wider share of white women without college degrees, according to AP VoteCast, a survey of more than 110,000 voters. And despite expectations that the much-analyzed gender gap would expand, it remained essentially the same from previous elections, including 2016.

In Congress, the big news was significant gains for Republican women, and overall a record number of women will serve in the 117th Congress — at least 141, including 105 Democrats and 36 Republicans, according to current numbers from the Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers University.

Overall, the results are “a moving target,” says Debbie Walsh, director of the center. But it was in sum “a good year,” she says, “both for the election of women candidates on both sides, and for the participation of women voters.“ And of course, a huge glass ceiling was shattered with the election of the first female vice president, Kamala Harris.

AP VoteCast showed a 9 percentage point difference between men and women in support for Biden and Harris: 55% of women and 46% of men. That was essentially unchanged from the 2018 midterms, when VoteCast found a 10-point gender gap, with 58% of women and 48% of men backing Democrats in congressional races.

Contrary to some expectations, “this was a very average gender gap,” says Susan J. Carroll, professor of political science and women’s and gender studies at Rutgers.

The gender gap in support for Democratic candidates

Read more

Women, People Of Color Comprise Around Half Of Biden’s Transition Team

Topline

Nearly half of President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team is made up of people of color while women comprise a slight majority of the team, new data from the campaign shows, indicating a Biden administration may look different than the predominately white and male White House under President Donald Trump.

Key Facts

According to diversity data first obtained by CNN, 46% of the approximately 500 people on Biden’s transition team are people of color, while 41% of the senior staff are people of color.

More than half of Biden’s senior staff (53%) and the team overall (52%) are made up of women.

Biden is expected to announce picks for his cabinet in the coming weeks, and tapped Ron Klain—a white man—as his chief of staff on Wednesday. 

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) is set to become the first female, Black, and South Asian vice president in U.S. history after Biden chose her as his running mate earlier this year. 

Crucial Quote

“Across the board — from our classrooms to our courtrooms to the president’s Cabinet — we have to make sure that our leadership and our institutions actually look like America,” Biden wrote in an op-ed in June. 

Surprising Fact

Trump’s cabinet is more white and male than any cabinet in almost 40 years, according to the New York Times. Around 25% of Trump’s appointments to Senate-confirmed positions are women. In contrast, around 43% of former President Barack Obama’s appointments were women by the beginning of his second term.

What To Watch For 

Trump has yet to concede and the General Services Administration has thus far refused to greenlight the start of the transition process, a crucial first step. 

Tangent 

Less than half of the senior staff on Trump and Biden’s campaign were people of color, according to data obtained by NBC News in June. Around a third (35%) of staff overall and senior advisers (36%) were people of color on Biden’s campaign, while 25% of senior staff on the Trump campaign were people of color. The Trump campaign did not release data on full time staff, according to NBC News. A majority of both campaigns were made up of women. 

Further Reading

People of color make up nearly half of Biden transition team (CNN)

Trump’s Cabinet So Far Is More White and Male Than Any First Cabinet Since Reagan’s (New York Times)

Who Could Make Up Biden’s Cabinet? (Forbes)

Biden Taps Ron Klain For Chief Of Staff As Transition Persists Despite Trump Resistance (Forbes)

Source Article

Read more

Joe Biden’s cabinet should be half women

Now, as president-elect, he’ll soon be in a position to address the problem not just at the scale of a presidential ticket but in an entire administration. Court challenges and bad sportsmanship by President Trump and his allies are temporarily logjamming the transition of power, but in the meantime, Biden should make another pledge. He should commit to a Cabinet that is at least 50 percent women.

The shrewd reason: He owes it to them. He owes his large popular-vote margins to women, just as Democratic presidents have owed their margins to women for the better part of three decades. Though 2020 exit polls are still murky and incomplete, early analysis shows Trump won men by eight percentage points; if men were the only voters, the election would look very different. Women voted for Biden in the double digits.

The bandwagon reason: Other countries are ahead of the United States on this. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau committed to gender parity in his Cabinet, as did French President Emmanuel Macron. In the cabinets of Finland, Sweden, South Africa, Costa Rica, Rwanda and Colombia, the numbers of women are equal to or greater than the numbers of men.

The practical reason: It should be easy. Women equal or outpace men in law school, medical school and college undergraduate programs. There have never been more of them in Congress (in this month’s election, 102 Democratic women and 32 Republican women were elected to the House of Representatives). There is no shortage of qualified women, no blockage in the pipeline, no drought in the talent pool.

The real reason: In the Year of our Lord 2020, there is simply no defensible reason not to.

If a president today cannot come up with a qualified Cabinet 50 percent composed of women or nonconforming genders, this reveals something unpalatable about the person in office.

The tired response to these arguments is going to be that Biden shouldn’t be thinking of gender but about “the best person for the job.” It’s a shopworn excuse. When Vice President Pence released a photo of the White House’s early coronavirus task force — the 17 people in it were all men, and nearly all White — the administration’s defenders argued that this was no time to be politically correct; this was the time to find “the best people for the job.”

That explanation only highlighted the problem. The White House presumably had access to the best scientific minds in the country. Given carte blanche to recruit the smartest people, the administration looked as hard as it could and determined that — huh, weird! — all of the smartest people were men. They were telling on themselves.

The story was the same for Donald Trump’s senior appointees at large, among whom there are only four women vs. 19 men in Cabinet or Cabinet-level positions. And for Barack Obama, where the ratio was 7 to 16. And for George W. Bush, whose outgoing Cabinet contained only five women.

Every one

Read more

Why bringing women back into the workforce is Joe Biden’s greatest opportunity to recharge the economy

We’ve heard plenty of discussion about President-elect Joe Biden’s plans for taxes and economic stimulus. But little attention has been paid to perhaps the greatest opportunity to recharge the battered economy: Bringing women back into the workplace.



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: President-elect Joe Biden speaks to the media while flanked by Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, at the Queen Theater after receiving a briefing from the transition Covid-19 advisory board on November 09, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.


© Provided by CNBC
President-elect Joe Biden speaks to the media while flanked by Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, at the Queen Theater after receiving a briefing from the transition Covid-19 advisory board on November 09, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.

The coronavirus pandemic has exposed deep structural flaws in America’s workplaces, setting back women’s advancement by decades.

Loading...

Load Error

In August and September, 80% of the more than one million employees who dropped out of the workforce were women — that’s a stunning loss of 865,000 women. And a recent McKinsey & Company survey found that one-third of all working mothers were considering scaling back or quitting altogether.

The “she-cession” that began in the spring is only accelerating. While the total unemployment rate is less than half of its April peak, the majority of those regained jobs have gone to men.

The situation is particularly dire for women of color; the unemployment rate for Black and Latina women in October was 9.2% and 9% respectively, versus 5.8% for white men. And that doesn’t count the many women who have dropped out altogether.

At the beginning of this year, women made up the majority of the workforce. Today, their number has thinned by 2.2 million, and the share of women either working or looking for work has plunged to levels not seen since 1988.

In theory, the Biden presidency would offer women, especially working women, a lifeline. But quite a bit will have to do with how amenable Congress is to the policies that Biden supports, and how aggressive his administration will be in championing them.

Among the most notable measures he backs:

  • Twelve weeks of paid family and sick leave. This is something we desperately need, as the U.S. is the only developed country in the world that doesn’t have some sort of paid family leave requirement.
  • Access to affordable childcare and universal preschool. All working parents, especially mothers, who are bearing the brunt of home schooling and childcare would benefit from this. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a third of women ages 25 to 44 say they aren’t working because of childcare demands — almost three times more than their male counterparts.
  • Wage gap transparency. Requiring companies to disclose wage information by gender, race and ethnicity was actually introduced by the Obama administration, but the Trump administration has attempted to roll back.
  • Increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour. This would help women afford to both work and pay for child care.

Assuming the Senate remains divided, we almost certainly won’t see all of these measures, and it will be a struggle to pass any of them.

While more women have been elected to the incoming Congress than ever before, they still comprise a minority in both houses. Biden

Read more

Jill Biden’s Fashion Will Tell a Different Story of America

Kelly Chiello/InStyle/Getty Images

During his victory speech on Saturday evening, President-elect Joe Biden hit his familiar talking points — unity, faith, and “building back better.” But there was one line in particular that caught my attention: “I’m Jill’s husband.” 

The 77-year-old victor spoke of his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, with the sort of loving language we haven’t heard from a president in four years. I jolted. This is what it feels like — what it’s supposed to feel like. When Jill took the stage as he concluded his monologue, appearing behind him in an embroidered floral Oscar de la Renta dress and matching navy “46” face mask, I couldn’t help but notice how their energy was in striking contrast to President Trump and Melania’s stiff and awkward shuffling and hand-swatting. Jill’s smile reached her eyes behind her mask, and it never let up.

Getty Images

In her role as FLOTUS, Jill will be more than just a paper doll reluctantly carrying out the duties traditionally forced upon the East Wing, like decorating the White House for Christmas, or holding her husband’s hand for what appears to be an agreed upon amount of time and not one second more. For the first time in history, the first lady of the United States will hold a job outside of the White House, continuing her work as an English professor at Northern Virginia community college. She’s not just FLOTUS — she’s professor, mom, grandma. She’s Joe’s wife. 

While the position of first lady has always been rife with expectations of idealized American womanhood — however unfair that expectation may be — over the past few decades, the left and the right have diverged on how “womanhood” is even defined. For conservatives, it means stereotypically feminine dress, and adherence to the rules of a patriarchal society (read: motherhood and subordination to the head of the household, even if both husband and wife work). On the other side of the spectrum, is the inclusive belief that a woman is any woman who identifies as such, period. Joe’s emphasis on unity as a basis for his campaign begs the question of whether or not Jill can appeal to conservatives and be something of a unifying force; it certainly wouldn’t be the first time that a first lady was called upon to help make her husband appear more palatable to his detractors. 

RELATED: Jill Biden Is Going Viral for Adorably Ensuring Joe Biden Social Distances

In terms of dress, Jill toes the partisan fashion line seamlessly, preferring feminine silhouettes and patterns, and rich, deep jewel tones. But everything she wears, she wears with an awareness of her role, the state of the union, and her audience; she understands that while image is a significant part of her impact, it’s not everything. Like Melania, she prefers statement heels — rock-stud Valentino heels, a blue suede lace-up stiletto — but so far she’s saved them for stages, not humanitarian relief efforts/PR stunts following a natural disaster. She’s

Read more

Teen with stutter shares what Joe Biden’s win means to him: ‘I see that as a gift’

Brayden Harrington, 13, made headlines after delivering a speech at the DNC.

“He told me we were members of the same club,” Brayden said at the time. “We stutter. It was really amazing to hear that someone like me became vice president.”

PHOTO: Brayden Harrington speaks by video feed about the bond he shares with Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden over stuttering during the 4th night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Aug. 20, 2020.

Brayden’s speech in August trended on Twitter and made news around the world, with many reaching out and commending the teen for his courage.

Biden’s historic win over the weekend as the 46th President of the United States means a lot to Harrington, who has struggled with his stutter for as long as he can remember.

“I was really happy for him,” Brayden told “Good Morning America.” “I have a really strong feeling he’s going to be a great president at this time.”

Brayden first met Biden on the campaign trail in his home state of New Hampshire in February. After Brayden’s dad, Owen Harrington, told then-candidate Biden about his son’s stutter, Biden stayed in touch with their family and offered tips to help Brayden help his condition.

The president-elect has had a stutter since he was a child. In 2015, Biden opened up about his speech impediment in a letter he wrote to the Stuttering Foundation of America.

“I personally understand the terrible fear and frustration of a stutter,” Biden wrote. “My stutter embarrassed me and made me question myself and my abilities daily.”

Today, Biden works with 25 other stutterers and gives them tips on things that worked for him as a kid.

Some of the tips he shared with Brayden included reading poems by William Butler Yeats aloud and marking up speeches to make them easier to deliver. Brayden credits the president-elect for changing his perspective about his stutter.

“Before, my No. 1 fear was my stutter, and that was close to the scariest thing in my life, and now… I’ve seen that as a gift,” said Brayden. “I have seen that as a way to improve myself mentally and physically, and I feel like I’ve really grown from meeting him.”

“For the president elect to have taken the time to do that for us means the world,” Brayden’s dad said. “He opened up massive opportunities for Brayden to build his confidence and then see that his stutter doesn’t matter. It’s been a gift. I can’t call it anything other than.”

Angeline Bernabe, Michelle Stoddart and Lauren Lantry

Read more

Kamala Harris and Jill Biden’s Victory Celebration Looks Honored American Fashion’s Pluralism

Photo credit: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images
Photo credit: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

From Harper’s BAZAAR

Last night’s Biden Harris victory celebration in Wilmington, Delaware was a great night for America—and for American fashion. In their first speeches as president-elect and vice president-elect, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris sought to heal the divisions that have defined the last four years in U.S. politics. And it is notable that the Carolina Herrera suffragette white suit Harris wore to deliver that message, as well as the Oscar de la Renta asymmetrical floral dress worn by future first lady Jill Biden, are both from immigrant-founded American fashion labels that have long dressed first ladies on both sides of the political aisle.

In her historic remarks as the first woman elected Vice President, Harris recalled how her late mother, an Indian immigrant, “believed so deeply in America where a moment like this is possible, and so I am thinking about her and about the generations of women, Black women, Asian, white, Latina, Native American women—who throughout our nation’s history have paved the way for this moment—women who fought and sacrificed so much for equality and liberty and justice for all.”

Photo credit: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Photo credit: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Harris’s peak lapel suit, from Carolina Herrera creative director Wes Gordon’s resort 2021 collection is by a label whose Venezuela-born eponymous founder proudly dressed first ladies regardless of their political affiliation. During her nearly four decade career (she retired in 2016), Herrera created clothes for Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton, Laura Bush, Michelle Obama, and, yes, Melania Trump.

Jill Biden’s embroidered midi dress is from the Oscar de la Renta resort 2020 collection co-designed by Laura Kim, who was raised in Korea and Canada, and Fernando Garcia, who spent his childhood in the Dominican Republic and Spain. They carry on the house’s late Dominican-born founder Oscar de la Renta’s relationship to the White House, which stretched all the way from Jackie Kennedy in 1962 to Michelle Obama shortly before his death in 2014. De la Renta supported his friend Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and was also a close confidante of Nancy Reagan and Laura Bush.

Photo credit: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Photo credit: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

From the moment Michelle Obama stepped out in red and black Narciso Rodriguez dress on the night that Barack Obama won his first presidential election in 2008, she began what would become a trademark of her style: supporting American talent, and in particular, designers of color. In doing so, she showed both the quiet power of fashion to speak volumes about our beliefs and created an unprecedented amount of value for the labels she chose to wear as first lady.

By the looks of it, at a moment when the American fashion industry has been hit hard by the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, it has found two major cheerleaders in our first ever female vice president-elect and future first lady. Biden’s dress sold out on The Outnet overnight.

You Might Also Like

Source Article

Read more