Love Is Blind ‘s Lauren Speed and Cameron Hamilton Celebrate 2nd Wedding Anniversary: ‘Grateful’

Paras Griffin/Getty Images Cameron Hamilton and Lauren Speed

Cheers to the happy couple!

Love Is Blind stars Lauren Speed and Cameron Hamilton are celebrating their second wedding anniversary — and Lauren’s 33rd birthday!

In honor of the couple’s anniversary — which, like her birthday, actually takes place on Monday — she shared a touching tribute to her husband, 30, on Sunday.

“Since my bday is tomorrow (the same day we got married) I’ll celebrate our love today!!!” Speed wrote alongside a loved-up photo of the couple. “Wow 2 whoooole years! We’ve made it through one of the craziest years of our lives! We came out stronger than ever.”

“I’m grateful to have you by my side pushing me, supporting me, loving me, making me laugh and cry (sometimes simultaneously), everyday teaching me a new level of love I never thought possible. We are growing ourselves, our businesses and eventually our family,” she added. “And I couldn’t think of anybody better to ride shotgun through this crazy beautiful life!!! Happy 2 years baby! Cheers to 80 more ✨💕 I love you!”

Charles Sykes/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images Lauren Speed and Cameron Hamilton

In his own tribute, Hamilton also expressed gratitude for finding the perfect partner to stand by his side “through the good and bad days.”

“You motivate me to be my best and to make you as happy as you make me. I am so thankful for the family we have joined together and created, even Sparx 🐕 😆 our adventure is just beginning – I’m looking forward to at least a hundred more years together!” he said.

RELATED: Love Is Blind‘s Cameron Hamilton Feels Like He and Lauren Speed ‘Won’ Despite Show’s Emmy Loss

The couple recently opened up about how they’ve kept their relationship “fresh” while spending so much time together at home these days. On a recent episode of PEOPLE’s YouTube series Celebrity Home Scavenger Hunt, Hamilton found a homemade “love coupon book” that his wife made for him.

“If you want to keep your marriage fresh, ladies and gents, make a little love coupon book,” Speed explained, noting that some of the coupons are a little too “adult” to share with viewers.

“The only problem is… why did I wait so long to redeem these coupons? I waited too long and she told me they expired,” Hamilton added with a laugh.

Lauren and Cameron are one of two couples from the series to remain married after falling in love sight unseen on the show. The other couple, Amber Pike and Matt Barnett, also recently celebrated their second wedding anniversary.

“Two years ago today since we officially said ‘I do’… and I still can’t keep my hands off you!” Amber, 28, wrote alongside a steamy snap of the pair sharing a smooch on the beach.

“Here’s to 2 years and a million more years together,” Barnett, 30, wrote in his own loving post.

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The UK’s Royal National Institute of Blind People has created the first accessible pregnancy test for visually impaired women



A woman holding the pregnancy test prototype. The&Partnership


© Provided by Business Insider
A woman holding the pregnancy test prototype. The&Partnership

  • Visually impaired women cannot use traditional pregnancy tests, so British charity the RNIB teamed up with marketing network The&Partnership to create an accessible one. 
  • Traditional tests rely on visual cues, meaning visually impaired women need help to use them – but the new test delivers results using a raised button. 
  • The purpose of the test is to grant women everywere the right to privacy and dignity, say the two companies behind it.
  • The product will not go beyond the prototype stage, but its creators hope the research will inspire other companies to focus on accessible design.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Visually impaired women can’t use pregnancy tests without assistance, so British designers have created a pioneering prototype, which allows such women to be the first to learn their results.

Instead of the usual striped lines or electronic screen, the prototype test produces a large raised button to indicate a positive result. This allows women to feel their results with their fingers.



The&Partnership


© The&Partnership
The&Partnership

The prototype also features bright colors to differentiate between the top and bottom of the test, a 50% larger absorbent pad, and a resistant grip on the reverse for ease.

Traditional pregnancy tests rely on visual cues

Currently, all pregnancy tests available in the market provide visual results. Women with visual impairments must ask for help to read their tests, and “are therefore never the first to know what is happening to their own bodies,” according to the companies behind the prototype, The&Partnership and UK charity the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

This is despite more than 5 million pregnancy tests being sold in the UK every year, making them one of the most-used pieces of home medical equipment, according to the RNIB.

Danielle, a blind woman who was involved in the development of the prototype, said: “I’ve taken a pregnancy test in the past and it’s been negative, and the person who has been reading it has said ‘Oh it’s probably just as well though, isn’t it?'”

In the past, she has also resorted to asking her neighbor for help to read test results, because her then-partner also had a visual impairment.



a person smiling for the camera: Danielle and her daughter. Danielle has had to ask for assistance to read her pregnancy test results. The&Partnership


© The&Partnership
Danielle and her daughter. Danielle has had to ask for assistance to read her pregnancy test results. The&Partnership

Not being able to read their results in private isn’t the only problem visually impaired women face when using traditional pregnancy tests.

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According to the RNIB, the packaging is difficult to open and the small size of the absorbent tip makes it difficult for women to tell whether they have sufficient urine on it.

The predominantly white designs of the tests also make it difficult for women to tell which way round the test should be held and where the

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Love Is Blind ‘s Amber Pike Celebrates 2nd Wedding Anniversary with Husband Matt Barnett

Matt Barnett and Amber Pike

Amber Pike and Matt Barnett are celebrating a relationship milestone!

On Friday, the Love Is Blind couple shared a pair of sweet social media tributes in honor of their second wedding anniversary. “Two years ago today since we officially said ‘I do’… and I still can’t keep my hands off you!” Amber, 28, wrote alongside a steamy snap of the pair sharing a smooch on the beach.

“Happy 2yr Wedding Anniversary to my frustrating-crazy-sweet-handsome hubby. I LOVE YOU @barnettisblind,” she added.

In his own loving post, Barnett, 30, wrote, “Here’s to 2 years and a million more years together.”

Of course, the festivities didn’t end there!

“So it’s mine and Amber’s second year anniversary. We’ve been together two years today, well not together, married two years today,” Barnett said in a series of Instagram Stories.

“So I went a little out and got us a nice hotel with a beautiful view,” he continued, noting that his wife wasn’t in on the plan just yet. “It’s going to be freaking awesome.”

After waking her up from a quick nap at home — and taking time out for a quick champagne toast — Barnett blindfolded Amber as they made their way to a nearby hotel.

“Aw, baby,” she said after he revealed the thoughtful surprise, before joking, “Is this why you had me pack so many stinkin outfits?”

RELATED: Love Is Blind‘s Amber and Barnett Open Up About Their Marriage: ‘We Still Are Pretty Gross’

Last month, Amber took a trip down memory lane as she reflected on how the pair celebrated their first anniversary — which had to be kept on the down-low since Love Is Blind had yet to premiere.

“Last year Matt and I celebrated our one year anniversary by going on a cruise with some friends who also had their first anniversary pretty close to ours. By the end of the trip we all agreed it should definitely be an annual thing, and an anniversary pact was made,” she wrote.

Although the pair had initially planned on celebrating their second anniversary with another trip, due to the coronavirus pandemic “that pretty much became impossible.” However, while a big vacation in Greece may have been out of the question, Amber was able to organize a small trip to the Blue Ridge mountains in honor of Barnett’s 30th birthday last month.

“I really wanted to do something special,” she continued. “The views were breathtaking, the company was hilarious, and the shenanigans were…. unmentionable 🤫😂 Definitely tooting my own horn here because the trip was, beyond a shadow of a doubt, a success. Happy Early Birthday-versary @barnettisblind.”

While reflecting on their bond earlier this year, Amber also told PEOPLE that they may have a second wedding someday. “I would love to do another wedding,” she said. “There’s no rush on it. We’re married now, but at some point.”

“We’re still having a lot of fun,” she continued. “Like I said on the show,

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The UK’s Royal National Institute of Blind People has helped create an accessible pregnancy test for visually impaired women



A woman holding the pregnancy test prototype. The&Partnership


© Provided by Business Insider
A woman holding the pregnancy test prototype. The&Partnership

  • Visually impaired women cannot use traditional pregnancy tests, so British charity the RNIB teamed up with marketing network The&Partnership to create an accessible one. 
  • Traditional tests rely on visual cues, meaning visually impaired women need help to use them – but the new test delivers results using a raised button. 
  • The purpose of the test is to grant women everywere the right to privacy and dignity, say the two companies behind it.
  • The product will not go beyond the prototype stage, but its creators hope the research will inspire other companies to focus on accessible design.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Visually impaired women can’t use pregnancy tests without assistance, so British designers have created a pioneering prototype, which allows such women to be the first to learn their results.

Instead of the usual striped lines or electronic screen, the prototype test produces a large raised button to indicate a positive result. This allows women to feel their results with their fingers.



The&Partnership


© The&Partnership
The&Partnership

The prototype also features bright colors to differentiate between the top and bottom of the test, a 50% larger absorbent pad, and a resistant grip on the reverse for ease.

Traditional pregnancy tests rely on visual cues

Currently, all pregnancy tests available in the market provide visual results. Women with visual impairments must ask for help to read their tests, and “are therefore never the first to know what is happening to their own bodies,” according to the companies behind the prototype, The&Partnership and UK charity the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

This is despite more than 5 million pregnancy tests being sold in the UK every year, making them one of the most-used pieces of home medical equipment, according to the RNIB.

Danielle, a blind woman who was involved in the development of the prototype, said: “I’ve taken a pregnancy test in the past and it’s been negative, and the person who has been reading it has said ‘Oh it’s probably just as well though, isn’t it?'”

In the past, she has also resorted to asking her neighbor for help to read test results, because her then-partner also had a visual impairment.



a person smiling for the camera: Danielle and her daughter. Danielle has had to ask for assistance to read her pregnancy test results. The&Partnership


© The&Partnership
Danielle and her daughter. Danielle has had to ask for assistance to read her pregnancy test results. The&Partnership

Not being able to read their results in private isn’t the only problem visually impaired women face when using traditional pregnancy tests.

According to the RNIB, the packaging is difficult to open and the small size of the absorbent tip makes it difficult for women to tell whether they have sufficient urine on it.

The predominantly white designs of the tests also make it difficult for women to tell which way round the test should be held and where the results will appear. Visually impaired people also struggle with the small size of the font on the instructions and the electronic screen, the  added.

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Clothing Brand Created by 2 Blind Brothers Is Working to Find a Cure for Blindness

Two blind brothers saw a need to launch a clothing brand that would help raise awareness of a rare degenerative eye disorder they’ve had most of their lives in hopes of finding a cure. And thus, Two Blind Brothers were born.

Bradford Manning, 35, and his brother Bryan, 30, are both legally blind. They have had Stargardt disease, an inherited form of macular degeneration typically passed onto children from their parents that causes central vision loss over time, since they were each 5. 

Experts estimate that the disease affects one in 8,000 to 10,000 people, according to the National Eye Institute, and although there is no treatment at this time, the institute said there are several gene therapy and drug therapy trials going on. 

When the brothers learned of a gene therapy discovered by an underfunded researcher for a juvenile eye disease that was about to hit the market back in 2015, they started doing their own research.

“It was mind-boggling to us,” Bryan told the Associated Press. “Our whole lives they were like, ‘Oh, a cure is down the line, a cure is down the line.’ This one isn’t for us, but it is happening, and the Foundation Fighting Blindness kicked this off with a just a tiny charitable gift to this brilliant researcher.”

And then came a purchase that changed their lives. During a trip to Bloomingdales, the brothers told the news outlet, the pair separated and met up later. It was then that they discovered they both had purchased the same shirt.

“It was the feel of it. It felt so soft and comfortable that we both keyed up on it, and then we had this idea, ‘Well what if we could take this sense of touch to a different place, make super comfortable clothing, and turn over the profits to researchers at work on eye diseases?’” said Bryan.

In 2016, Brad, who worked at an investment firm, and Bryan, who sold software, left their fields to launch Two Blind Brothers.

Their casual line of clothing, an assortment of ultra-soft Henley shirts, hoodies, polos and T-shirts, socks, knit beanies, and sunglasses for men and women, along with items for kids, are made from bamboo mixed with cotton and spandex, and manufactured out of their Los Angeles facility. Their merch is sold online at Twoblindbrothers.com.

The brothers have incorporated Braille into their designs that indicate the color of each garment. Their items start at $30 up to $200, with all the proceeds going to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, which conducts research to help eradicate blindness.

When asked how two guys with a rare degenerative eye disease would go into a business about designing clothes, Bradford told the New York Post: “We do have an edge when it comes to fabrics and responding to touch,” he said.  “But we did have to call in a lot of favors.”

And, boy did the favors help.

Over the years, the company has picked up celebrity supporters like entrepreneur Richard Branson, Ice-T,

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How two blind brothers created a one-of-a-kind shopping experience to raise money for a cure

Would you buy something you can’t see?That’s the question posed by two New York brothers who’ve lost much of their vision to a rare degenerative eye disorder and have dedicated their lives — and livelihoods — to raising money for a cure.Bradford Manning, 35, and his 30-year-old brother, Bryan, are the founders of the clothing brand Two Blind Brothers. They’ve hit on a strategy that’s helped raise more than $700,000 for the cause: selling mystery boxes full of an assortment of their ultra-soft shirts, cozy socks, knit beanies and sunglasses.The two turn over all profits from the boxes and their other sales to groups like the Foundation Fighting Blindness, funding research on retinal eye ailments like the one they’ve suffered from since they were 5, Stargardt disease. It’s an inherited form of macular degeneration that causes central vision loss over time.“We just wanted to try and help and raise awareness and just do something good,” said Bryan.Since 2016, when they left their previous careers — Brad worked for an investment firm and Bryan sold software — they’ve picked up celebrity supporters like Ice-T and entrepreneur Richard Branson. Ellen DeGeneres helped with one of her famous Shutterfly checks for $30,000. And the sale of their mystery boxes, costing between $30 to $200, is now a social media phenomenon.Customers have included relatives of the blind, among them parents with vision impaired children; some have posted unboxing videos on TikTok, Facebook and Instagram, with a few opening boxes blindfolded. The brothers hit on the idea in 2015, when a gene therapy discovered by an underfunded researcher for an unrelated juvenile eye disease was about to hit the market. “It was mind boggling to us,” Bryan said. “Our whole lives they were like, ‘Oh, a cure is down the line, a cure is down the line.’ This one isn’t for us, but it is happening, and the Foundation Fighting Blindness kicked this off with just a tiny charitable gift to this brilliant researcher.”Soon after, they were separated while shopping at Bloomingdale’s. When they reconnected, they found that they had purchased the same soft shirt.“It was the feel of it. It felt so soft and comfortable that we both keyed upon it, and then we had this idea, well what if we could take this sense of touch to a different place, make super comfortable clothing” and turn over the profits to researchers at work on eye diseases, Bryan said.With advice from friends in the fashion industry, two blind brothers became Two Blind Brothers.The casual line of super soft Henleys, hoodies, polos and T-shirts for men and women, along with offerings for kids, are made of sustainable bamboo mixed with cotton and spandex. They’ve incorporated Braille indicating the color of each garment into some of the designs they sell online at Twoblindbrothers.com.The goods were originally manufactured in Texas, mostly by visually impaired people. But as they’ve grown, most of the operation moved to Los Angeles. Brad was diagnosed at 7 after their mother, a nurse, …

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Two Blind Brothers clothing brand a cause-driven phenomenon

NEW YORK — Would you buy something you can’t see?

That’s the question posed by two New York brothers who’ve lost much of their vision to a rare degenerative eye disorder and have dedicated their lives — and livelihoods — to raising money for a cure.

Bradford Manning, 35, and his 30-year-old brother, Bryan, are the founders of the clothing brand Two Blind Brothers. They’ve hit on a strategy that’s helped raise more than $700,000 for the cause: selling mystery boxes full of an assortment of their ultra-soft shirts, cozy socks, knit beanies and sunglasses.

The two turn over all profits from the boxes and their other sales to groups like the Foundation Fighting Blindness, funding research on retinal eye ailments like the one they’ve suffered from since they were 5, Stargardt disease. It’s an inherited form of macular degeneration that causes central vision loss over time.

“We just wanted to try and help and raise awareness, and just do something good,” said Bryan.

Since 2016, when they left their previous careers — Brad worked for an investment firm and Bryan sold software — they’ve picked up celebrity supporters like Ice-T and entrepreneur Richard Branson. Ellen DeGeneres helped with one of her famous Shutterfly checks for $30,000.

And the sale of their mystery boxes, costing from $30 to $200, is now a social media phenomenon.

Customers have included relatives of the blind, among them parents with vision impaired children; some have posted unboxing videos on TikTok, Facebook and Instagram, with a few opening boxes blindfolded.

The brothers hit on the idea in 2015, when a gene therapy discovered by an underfunded researcher for an unrelated juvenile eye disease was about to hit the market.

“It was mind boggling to us,” Bryan said. “Our whole lives they were like, `Oh, a cure is down the line, a cure is down the line.’ This one isn’t for us, but it is happening, and the Foundation Fighting Blindness kicked this off with just a tiny charitable gift to this brilliant researcher.”

Soon after, they were separated while shopping at Bloomingdale’s. When they reconnected, they found that they had purchased the same soft shirt.

Brothers Bradford (left) and Bryan Manning are the founders of the Two Blind Brothers clothing brand. Since 2016, when they left their previous careers — Brad worked for an investment firm and Bryan sold software — they’ve picked up celebrity supporters like Ice-T, entrepreneur Richard Branson and Ellen DeGeneres.

Brothers Bradford (left) and Bryan Manning are the founders of the Two Blind Brothers clothing brand. Since 2016, when they left their previous careers — Brad worked for an investment firm and Bryan sold software — they’ve picked up celebrity supporters like Ice-T, entrepreneur Richard Branson and Ellen DeGeneres.
AP

“It was the feel of it. It felt so soft and comfortable that we both keyed upon it, and then we had this idea, well what if we could take this sense of touch to a different place, make super comfortable clothing” and turn over the profits to researchers at work on eye diseases, Bryan said.

With advice from friends in the fashion industry, two blind brothers became Two Blind Brothers.

The casual line of super soft Henleys, hoodies, polos and T-shirts for men and women, along with offerings for

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Strategies for Creating a Successful Supermarket Shopping Experience for Visually Impaired and Blind

1. First and foremost, be sure to follow Americans with Disabilities Act 1990/ADA (amended) accommodations and recommendations. These recommendations are important to the safety and accessibility of the visually impaired and blind individual. Be familiar with amended or updated ADA regulations.

2. Introduce yourself to your visually impaired or blind shopper. Maintain an attentive open line of communication to the specific individualized requests or concerns of your visually impaired and blind customers. The time you invest with your customer may result in suggestions that help maximize not only their shopping experience but improve the overall shopping experience for the general population. Inform visually impaired and blind customers of specific Braille labeled items in your store such as vending machines or ATM’s.

3. Many supermarkets already offer website or online shopping and delivery service. Be sure that your visually impaired and blind customers are aware of this option should they prefer this type of service. Having the ability to phone in shopping orders might be the right option for the individual who may not be connected through technology resources.

4. Inform visually impaired and blind shoppers if you currently offer weekly shopping circulars online. There are currently a variety of assistive computer technology screen readers or magnification programs available. These software programs offer auditory access, magnification, high- definition text and productivity tools allowing easy access to your weekly circular.

5. Your visually impaired or blind customer may not have access to technology. Getting to know your customer will help identify if they have a need for a large print or Braille copy of your weekly circular. Contact a Braille transcription service for professional transcription of your weekly circular into Braille format. Allow your Braille transcription service adequate time to complete Braille requests. Be sure that your visually impaired and blind customers have access to a large print or a Braille copy of your weekly sale circular prior to their visit if this is their preferred format. It is essential that your visually impaired and blind shopper have the same opportunity to preview weekly circular items so that they can adequately plan their shopping list with consideration of sales, promotions and specials prior to their store visit.

6. Smartphone applications are becoming readily available providing a wealth of information including identification of product labels, pricing and nutritional information. Discuss specific phone applications available at your store so that your visually impaired and blind shoppers can take advantage of these unique tools. Consider having a cell phone available at your store with your specific shopping applications for use by those individuals that may not have this technology available to them.

7. Take the time to provide some orientation to the shopping aisles. It may be helpful to briefly review selection of items offered on each aisle. Simple aisle orientation may be helpful to your visually impaired and blind shopper for planning of their shopping trip.

8. Offer the option of a supermarket shopping buddy. This option may be helpful especially when navigating the …

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