Park Yoo Na Has Both Beauty And Brains In Webtoon-Based Drama “True Beauty”

tvN’s upcoming drama “True Beauty” released new stills of Park Yoo Na!

Based on the hit webtoon of the same name, “True Beauty” is a romantic comedy about a girl named Lim Ju Gyeong (Moon Ga Young) who zealously uses makeup to hide her bare face and combat her insecurities about her looks. ASTRO‘s Cha Eun Woo will star in the drama as Lee Su Ho, a popular student who has his own emotional wounds, while Hwang In Yeob will play Han Seo Jun, an untamable rebel with a surprisingly warm heart.

Park Yoo Na will be playing the role of Kang Soo Jin, the cool and feisty “goddess” of Saebom High School. In the newly released stills, Kang Soo Jin captivates viewers with her sharp and stunning visuals. Wearing a clean-cut school uniform with a green tie and short earrings, Kang Soo Jin displays a refined and elegant style and a clever personality.

Furthermore, Kang Soo Jin portrays contrasting charms in the stills. In one photo, she has a doubtful and cynical gaze, while another photo highlights her beauty as she smiles brightly. Viewers are already curious to find out what role Kang Soo Jin will play in the upcoming drama.

The production team shared, “From the first filming, Park Yoo Na impressed by perfectly absorbing the character Kang Soo Jin with her solid acting skills and thorough research of her character.” They added, “In particular, Park Yoo Na’s cold charisma and Moon Ga Young’s lovely charm will work together to create great synergy, brightening up the filming set. Please look forward to it.”

“True Beauty” premieres on December 9 at 10:30 p.m. KST and will be available with English subtitles on VIki.

In the meantime, check out a teaser for the drama below!

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Sonali Bendre accepts a new challenge. Fans call her beauty with brains



a woman in glasses looking at the camera: Sonali Bendre has accepted a reading challenge.


Sonali Bendre has accepted a reading challenge.

Sonali Bendre is an avid reader and often posts about the books she has been reading. The actress braved cancer in 2018, and often shares posts that end up inspiring her millions of followers on Instagram. This time around, Sonali has taken up the challenge of doing what many of us just keep thinking about. She intends to read all the books in her library.

A BOOK LOVER

Sonali has started an initiative, Sonali Bendre Book Club, where she has been posting about her latest reads. Her latest picture is that of Sonali in reading mode. She is wearing her glasses and reading a book. She wrote on Instagram, “Finish all the books in my library? Challenge Accepted (sic).”

Sonali’s fans flooded her comments section with compliments. While some asked for book recommendations, many fans described the pic as pretty, beautiful and superb. A fan wrote, “you are my favourite,” and another commented, “beauty queen.” Take a look:

Couple of days ago, Sonali penned a note about her latest read, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong. Sharing a pic with the book in her hand, she wrote, “Sometimes when reading a book, it’s not so much about the destination as it is about the journey, which is the act of reading itself. And some books are so beautifully written that it’s a complete joy to sit and cuddle with the book, reread a few lines and just relish the process. ‘On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous’ by Ocean Vuong, the award-winning Vietnamese American poet, is one such book.”

She added, “The book is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read, and explores family history, race, class, and survival. It is the #SBCBookOfTheMonth and I’m looking forward to reading it and discussing it with you (sic).”

Sometimes when reading a book, it’s not so much about the destination as it is about the journey, which is the act of reading itself. And some books are so beautifully written that it’s a complete joy to sit and cuddle with the book, reread a few lines and just relish the process. ‘On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous’ by Ocean Vuong, the award-winning Vietnamese American poet, is one such book. The book is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read, and explores family history, race, class, and survival. It is the #SBCBookOfTheMonth and I’m looking forward to reading it and discussing it with you. @ocean_vuong @penguinrandomhouse @sonalisbookclub

A post shared by Sonali Bendre (@iamsonalibendre) on Oct 27, 2020 at 3:16am PDT

ALWAYS AN INSPIRATION

At India Today Group’s E-Conclave Corona Series held earlier this year, Sonali had talked about being open about her cancer diagnosis. She said, “I think we have to just adapt. We are in the age where information is available at our fingertips. I would just say that I didn’t want any negativity or speculation about it. Also because my son was twelve at that point

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beauty still trumps brains in too many workplaces

Universities position themselves as places where brains matter. It seems strange then that students at a US university would rate attractive academics to be better teachers. This was the finding of a recent paper from the University of Memphis, which concluded that female academics suffered most from this.

It raises an uncomfortable proposition, that beauty trumps brains even in 21st century workplaces. It would certainly be supported by veteran female broadcasters such as radio presenter Libby Purves, who recently complained about the way the BBC dispenses with women of a certain age.

Another survey, this time in the UK, gave a deeper sense of the problem. It reported that employers were asking female employees to dress “sexier” and wear make-up during video meetings.

Published by law firm Slater and Gordon over the summer, and based on a poll of 2,000 office-based staff working from home during lockdown, the report found that 35% of women had experienced at least one sexist demand from their employer, usually relating to how they dressed for video meetings. Women also reported being asked to wear more makeup, do something to their hair or dress more provocatively. Reasons offered by their bosses were that it would “help win business” and be “pleasing to a client”.

Woman on zoom call at work
Women get it worst.
Girts Ragelis

It seems as though the shift to more virtual working has not eradicated what Danielle Parsons, an employment lawyer at Slater and Gordon, described as “archaic behaviour” which “has no place in the modern working world”. When employees’ performance is judged on the basis of their physical appearance, potentially shaping their pay and prospects in work, it is known as lookism. It’s not illegal, but arguably it should be.

Beauty and the boss

The Slater and Gordon survey findings affirm that many trends that we describe in our recent book, Aesthetic Labour, are widespread and continuing despite remote working. Our book reports over 20 years of research and thinking about this problem. Although our research started by focusing on frontline work in hospitality and retail, the same issue has expanded into a diverse range of roles including academics, traffic wardens, recruitment consultants, interpreters, TV news anchors and circus acrobats.

Woman acrobat performing at circus
No escaping it.
David Tadevosian

Companies think that paying greater attention to employees’ appearance will make them more competitive, while public sector organisations think it will make them more liked. As a result, they are all becoming ever more prescriptive in telling employees how they should look, dress and talk.

It happens both to men and women, though more often to women, and is often tied in more broadly with sexualising them at work. For example, while Slater and Gordon found that one-third of men and women had “put up with” comments about their appearance during video calls, women were much likelier to face degrading requests to appear sexier.

When we analysed ten years of employees’ complaints about lookism to the Equal Opportunities Commission in Australia, we found that the proportion from men was rising across

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