The Best Sexy Lingerie And Cozy Loungewear Brands

When stay-at-home began, women quickly traded out their micro-skirts and Amina Muaddi heels for worn-in tees and cotton joggers.

Luxury lingerie brands, however, began to emerge as an unpredictable COVID chameleon, reporting a noticeable uptick in their lacier and more provocative sales. For some brands like Agent Provocateur, the more risqué styles like leather playsuits and bondage accessories began tracking higher-than-usual sales, too. Last week, Zion Market Research reported that the women’s lingerie market, which was valued at USD 35.9 billion in 2017, is anticipated to grow over 10% by next year — remaining largely unaffected by the global pandemic.

While temperatures continue to drop and stay-at-home orders resurface, coziness and comfort are reclaiming their role as wardrobe’s ringleader. But whether comfort is defined by a lace bodysuit and silk knickers or cashmere pants and a pima cotton hoodie — well, that’s a personal decision. Whichever you decide, these brands are the very best.

La Perla

The brand that is almost as ubiquitous for luxury lingerie as Clorox is for bleach. La Perla slowly and exponentially swallows their competition like a sexy, lace-wearing Venus flytrap. The French lingerie maker reported an uptick of 200% in sales between April and May of 2020. With collections like Petit Macramé and La Perla Maison, their timeless pieces show no signs of slowing down.

SKATIE

The eponymous Venice-based swim and activewear brand’s new loungewear collection is the de facto uniform for L.A. women. Built on a bedrock of sustainability, SKATIE pieces are made in L.A. from as many recycled materials and responsibly-sourced fabrics as opportunity presents. Based on the founder commandeering her husband’s loungewear, the new collection’s hero joggers are made to fit oversized and ever-cozy.

Kiki De Montparnasse

Confusion and heartbreak struck the minds of many when Kiki De Montparnasse suddenly closed their doors in 2016. But when the brand relaunched online, fans rejoiced. With a sexy array of both lingerie and clothing that looks like lingerie, the edgy brand is known for bringing out the wearer’s wild side.

Journelle

A luxury lingerie store in New York City, Journelle is a multi-brand destination for intimates. In addition to the store’s own luxury line, brands like Fleur of England and Hanro can be found on their digital shelves.

Coco de Mer

A niche London-based lingerie and pleasure destination, Coco de Mer began as a small brick-and-mortar boutique in Convent Gardens. Specializing in sensual styles, they are too, a multi-destination for sexy, niche brands and more erotic pieces.

Brunello Cucinelli

For a brand like Brunello Cucinelli, or just “Bruno” as its referred to by its wealthy wearers, the term ‘loungewear’ is not in their lexicon. The infamous cashmere sweatpants are instead referred to as ‘travelwear’, because it’s only when traveling to St. Moritz for Snow

Read more

the mixed bag of Philip Green brands

Arcadia has gone into administration, completing Sir Philip Green’s fall from the king of the high street. Here we look at the tycoon’s brands from a fashion perspective:



a woman posing for a picture: Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images



a woman posing for a picture: British supermodel Kate Moss poses in a window as she promotes her range of clothing at a Top Shop store in London in 2007.


© Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images
British supermodel Kate Moss poses in a window as she promotes her range of clothing at a Top Shop store in London in 2007.

Topshop

Bright, buzzy and big, Topshop was once as agenda-setting as the high street got. At the Oxford Street HQ, every square inch was filled with the latest catwalk trend, a fashion-forward accessory or, randomly, a wall full of pick and mix. Its denim range was gamechanging and it collaborations were inspired and occasionally on point (Kate Moss, Jonathan Saunders). Yes, Topshop suggests the shopper has the attention span of a gnat, but it also feels truly aspirational, like your life could be changed by one purchase. Despite some of its shine being taken away in recent years by Primark and online stores, Topshop remains the most fashion forward of the big high street stores.

Wallis



a group of people standing in front of a building: A Wallis shop window. Photograph: PjrTravel/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
A Wallis shop window. Photograph: PjrTravel/Alamy

Pitched somewhere south of sensible chic, if Topshop was Fleabag, Wallis is the uptight, sensible older sister. With no-nonsense clean lines and work-centric looks, Wallis’s clothes are dispassionate and sober. The brand’s petite range was important, catering to a demographic that was sometimes ignored on the high street. But in general, the clothes are hard to get too excited about.

Evans

Truly pioneering in its plus-size ranges, Evans has been democratising high street fashion since the 30s when the first branch opened. Evans doesn’t put customers in predictable boxes – its range of styles importantly shows a world beyond “frumpy”.

Topman

For a period, Topman managed to inject the usually glacial high street menswear scene with some much-needed fun and excitement. It also seamlessly bridged the gap between “high street” and “high end” with a place at the London fashion week table and collaborations with people such as the designer Charlie Casely-Hayford and spin-off ranges such as AAA and Topman Signature. What Topman lacks in durable basics it makes up for in whip-smart seasonal trends and occasional out-of-the-box collaborations.

Burton

Burton was founded in 1904 and was responsible for making three-piece suits for soldiers returning from the second world war. And while it will always be known for its all-in-one suit – for every occasion from weddings to job interviews – Burton is coy when inching out of the tailoring realm. Its daywear always has a slightly awkward feel about it: clothes for a dad who “still has it”.

Miss Selfridge

Pre-internet, Miss Selfridge was the coming-of-clothing-age store for young girls. But recently Miss Selfridge ploughed the same ground as Boohoo and Pretty Little Things: play hard, working girl chic 2.0, although it does it in a much less controversial way.

Dorothy Perkins

Once a huge brand, with about 350 shops at one point. It

Read more

Shop These Cool Asian-Owned Clothing Brands, and You’ll Be the Most Stylish Person

There are an endless amount of clothing brands out there to shop from, but if you’re tired of fast fashion and want to give some love to other labels, check out these amazing Asian-owned ones. And yes, we’re aware that the word “Asian” can lump together vastly different countries and cultures, so we included a mix of brands that are Chinese-, Japanese-, Nepalese-, Vietnamese-, Taiwanese-, Indian-, and Pakistani-owned (and more!), so you can see the variety of all these amazingly cool designers and their creations. From colorful knitwear to luxe silks, there’s something here for everyone. Also, some designer brands are more established while others on this list are relatively new and up-and-coming, but all of them warrant your attention for their unique and downright stunning designs. Keep scrolling below for 28 Asian-owned clothing—and accessory!—brands that you’ll want to start shopping at immediately.

If you want to continue to show your support to BIPOC-owned brands, especially for the upcoming holiday gift-giving season, click the links to check out these Black-owned brands, Indian fashion designers, and Latina-owned businesses. Now go forth and browse through all these awesome labels!

Source Article

Read more

28 Asian-Owned Clothing Brands to Shop in 2020

asian owned clothing brands

courtesy

There are an endless amount of clothing brands out there to shop from, but if you’re tired of fast fashion and want to give some love to other labels, check out these amazing Asian-owned ones. And yes, we’re aware that the word “Asian” can lump together vastly different countries and cultures, so we included a mix of brands that are Chinese-, Japanese-, Nepalese-, Vietnamese-, Taiwanese-, Indian-, and Pakistani-owned (and more!), so you can see the variety of all these amazingly cool designers and their creations. From colorful knitwear to luxe silks, there’s something here for everyone. Also, some designer brands are more established while others on this list are relatively new and up-and-coming, but all of them warrant your attention for their unique and downright stunning designs. Keep scrolling below for 28 Asian-owned clothing—and accessory!—brands that you’ll want to start shopping at immediately.

If you want to continue to show your support to BIPOC-owned brands, especially for the upcoming holiday gift-giving season, click the links to check out these Black-owned brands, Indian fashion designers, and Latina-owned businesses. Now go forth and browse through all these awesome labels!

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

1

YanYan Knits

Your wardrobe will be so colorful and cozy thanks to this brand founded by former Rag & Bone knitwear director Phyllis Chan and Hong Kong designer Suzzie Chung. The name “YanYan” means “everyone” in Cantonese, FYI.

SHOP NOW

2

Delaroq

Upgrade your accessory game with this bag brand by designer Jennifer Lyu. It features croc-embossed designs, structured tote bags, and chic crossbody styles; plus, it offers some super cute knit beanies, too.

SHOP NOW

3

Sandy Liang

Liang’s signature fleece outerwear is a covetable fall and winter staple, and she’s also done cool collabs with Vans and Spongebob Squarepants. The New York-native is definitely a designer that you’ll be seeing more of.

SHOP NOW

4

Adeam

Japanese designer Hanako Maeda founded Adeam (her last name backwards!), and the line is inspired by both New York City and Tokyo since she constantly traveled back and forth between the two cities growing up. She recently collaborated with tennis star Naomi Osaka on a new collection.

SHOP NOW

5

Altuzarra

Both Chinese and French, Joseph Altuzarra studied ballet for years before he got into the fashion industry. He founded his namesake label in 2008 and his pieces have a modern aesthetic that are chic and timeless.

SHOP NOW

6

Prabal Gurung

Born in Singapore and raised in Nepal, Prabal Gurung has so many romantic, dreamy pieces like this Cinderella-esque strapless dress. He founded the brand in 2009 and has dressed countless A-listers since, including Michelle Obama and Kate Middleton.

SHOP NOW

7

3.1 Phillip Lim

Created by founders Phillip Lim and Wen Zhou, the brand debuted in 2005 at New York Fashion Week and has since expanded into other categories like bags, shoes, and menswear.

SHOP NOW

8

Derek Lam

The Chinese-American designer was born in San Francisco and launched his namesake label in 2003. His alternate

Read more

8 women-owned brands you can support today (and every day, really)

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

If you want to be a bit more intentional with where and how you spend your money this holiday season, how about showing women-owned businesses some love? From food to sustainable clothing, women are changing the game in so many incredible ways.

If you’re on the hunt for incredible deals, don’t let that deter you from shopping women-owned business. Here are 8 women-owned brands, both big and small, hosting must-shop sales right now

1. The Essentials, $59.50 (Orig. $85)

Credit: Act + Acre

2. Hit Refresh Set, $49 (Orig. $55)

Credit: Alleyoop

3. The Lodge Trio, $104 (Orig. $144)

Credit: bkr

  • Reusable water bottles and lip balms are all 25 percent off at bkr. Plus, you’ll receive a free Spiked Bubbly 500 mL bottle on orders over $75.

4. Nail Artist In Big Night Out, $14 (Orig. $28)

Credit: Emilie Heathe

5. The Bliss, $45

Credit: Harper Wilde

  • Need new undergarments? Hit up Harper Wilde’s buy more, save more sale. Take 35 percent off orders over $150, 25 percent off orders over $125, 20 percent off orders over $100 and 15 percent off all other orders.

6. The Exercise Dress, $90 (Orig. $100)

Credit: Outdoor Voices

7. Celestial Divinity: Risque Rose & Matterance Duo, $114

Credit: Pat McGrath

8. Faux Leather Moto Leggings, $88 (Orig. $110)

Credit: Spanx

If you enjoyed this story, check out this top-rated hair growth shampoo that’s 20 percent off on Amazon right now.

More from In The Know:

Hause of Curls is helping people embrace their naturally curly hair

Brwngrlz jewelry is bringing representation to WOC everywhere

Baby Yoda is the hottest toy of 2020, and it’s just $17 at Walmart

This warm and cozy teddy coat is affordable enough to buy in multiple colors

The post 8 women-owned brands you can support today (and every day, really) appeared first on In The Know.

Source Article

Read more

How Fair Wear Is Working With Fashion Brands To Protect The Rights Of Garment Workers Around The World

Millions of garment workers around the world face poverty and human rights violations every day. Supply chains are very complicated, and there are still many places where things can go wrong. Most clothing brands don’t own their factories, but they do have a lot of influence over how factories treat workers.

Fair Wear is an independent multi-stakeholder organisation that works with garment brands, garment workers and industry influencers to improve labor conditions in garment factories.

In particular, Fair Wear works with some of the world’s leading fashion brands like Acne, Nudie, Katherine Hamnett, Filippa K and more, who take their responsibilities seriously, and want to learn how to use their influence to make life better for the people who make their clothing.

I caught up with Lotte Schuurman, Fair Wear’s Head of Communications to learn more about their work.

Afdhel Aziz: Hi Lotte, welcome! Please tell us a little about the purpose and work of Fair Wear?

Lotte Schuurman: At Fair Wear, we’re pushing to create a garment industry that is fair for all.

For a very long time already, we have been producing clothes the same way, like we always have. The consumer is underpaying, and the worker is underpaid. Due to the ‘race to the bottom’, margins are too low.

We know there’s a better way to make clothes. A way in which workers feel safe and respected and receive a salary that is enough to provide for their families. We’re pushing to make this the new normal.

Together with garment brands and other industry players, we work on better labour conditions for the men and women who make our clothes. We’re tackling complex problems, like payment of a living wage and ending gender-based violence, by uncovering new solutions and driving step-by-step improvements that create real change for the people who work in garment factories.

Aziz: Do you think Fast Fashion is having its Fast Food moment of crisis? Is there a discrepancy between what consumers say and what they do?

Schuurman: We’re still buying a lot of clothes, although the COVID-19 crisis is changing that. A Deloitte study (April 2019) found that American consumers are now spending a smaller portion of their income on clothing. The spending as a percentage of the total household expenses has been cut in half since 1987, declining from 5 percent to 2 percent. However, this does not necessarily imply a disinterest in clothing or fashion on the part of the consumer. In fact, there has been a continued increase in the number of units of apparel sold, consistent with the overall growth rate in retail. Clothing has become cheaper. And this is happening while low wages and poor working conditions still hit the news on a regular basis.

On the other hand, we also see more interest in sustainable fashion. Research (Jan. 2020) shows that consumers are looking for greater

Read more

Sustainable Brands: Black Friday 2020 Sales

(CNN) —  

The Black Friday shopping frenzy is officially upon us. There are thousands of sales going on throughout the week all over the internet, but if you’re shopping for some new clothes, you might be doing more damage to the earth than you’d think. The fashion industry is notoriously horrible for the environment, so what’s the best way to shop responsibly this year?

The easiest answer is to keep your clothes for as long as possible and buy used. Sites like ThredUp, Poshmark and Depop allow you to sell and buy clothes online, like a fashion-exclusive Craigslist. Or, if those aren’t your style, you can even rent clothes from services such as Rent The Runway.

However, if you’re set on buying new clothes, there are certain brands that are doing the work to ensure their products are more sustainable, whether the clothes themselves are recyclable, or they’re crafted with recycled materials.

In the end, the most important thing is to really do your research to see if a brand meets your own sustainability standards. Below, we’ve listed out some of our favorite sustainable fashion brands, many of which have Black Friday sales live now.

Girlfriend Collective

Girlfriend Collective

PHOTO:
Girlfriend Collective

If you’re shopping for activewear, it’ll be pretty hard to find a more eco-friendly option than Girlfriend Collective. It uses 100% recyclable packaging and tons of recycled materials in its products. We tried out some Girlfriend Collective leggings ourselves, and thought they were fantastic. Dive into the brand’s sustainability efforts on its site, and while you’re there, check out its Black Friday sale, where you can get 30% off sitewide through December 1.

Naadam

Naadam responsibly sources and creates luxuriously soft and stylish cashmere from sheep herded in Mongolia. On its site, you’ll find the famous $75 cashmere sweater (which always seems to be selling out) and the brand’s first ever Social and Environmental Impact Report. Naadam also has some lofty goals for 2025, including paying a living wage across its entire supply chain, using recycled materials and going carbon neutral. Right now, you can save 40% on select styles for men and women with code BLACKFRI40.

Patagonia

Patagonia

PHOTO:
Patagonia

The outdoors brand creates a ton of its clothes with recycled materials, which is a huge plus, but a big reason why Patagonia is a great brand for the earth is its 1% for the Planet tax, which it imposes on itself to provide support to environmental nonprofits around the globe.

Reformation

Reformation

PHOTO:
Reformation

Los Angeles-based Reformation puts a huge focus on sustainability — and it’s not quiet about it. You can check out the brand’s initiatives and progress in making itself cleaner and more sustainable right on its site. And now, you can save 30% off sitewide to stock up on dresses and more.

Allbirds

That’s right, Allbirds doesn’t only make shoes, the brand has recently ventured into apparel. The cozy knits are made from merino wool and are tested for harmful substances according to the strict global criteria of Standard

Read more

4 Women-Owned Beauty Brands Inspired by the Founder’s Cultural Heritage

South of the equator is Brazil; just north of the Amazon River in the depths of the rainforest is Guyana; nearly ten thousand miles east from there, you’ll find yourself in India; and off the Gulf of Guinea is Nigeria. These four women descend from those four vastly different countries around the globe. Some grew up there, but they all feel a deep connection to their ancestors and heritage. And they have one more thing in common: Their culture is at the very heart of their brands. 

Each of the products they have launched is a beautiful reflection of who they are and their personal experiences. In many ways, their past has become their inspiration for product designs, formulation and ingredients, and brand messaging. And when these beauty entrepreneurs pull from the rich tapestry of their cultural experiences, you get gold hair jewelry reminiscent of African relics, skin-care ingredients from the Amazon, and a spectrum of eye shadows to flatter every skin tone of the world. 

Here, these inspiring businesswomen — Deepica Mutyala, founder of Live Tinted, Nigella Miller, founder of Afra, Camila Coelho, Founder of Elaluz, and Sharon Chuter, founder of Uoma Beauty —  share how they dreamed up their respective brands with products that are changing the world of beauty. 

Deepica Mutyala, Founder of Live Tinted

Deepica Mutyala

Anuj Goyal

“Growing up, I didn’t see base colors that worked for my skin tone, partly because shades didn’t exist but also because in Indian culture fair is considered beautiful. My mother would put a lighter-tone powder on me because in her mind that was the standard of beauty. By 16, I wanted to have my own beauty line to change that narrative. I promised myself when I started Live Tinted [it was a digital community before evolving into a product line] that it was going to stand for something bigger than me. It was for anyone who hasn’t been represented in the beauty industry, which as a South Asian woman, I know includes us. To ‘live tinted’ is to embrace your skin tone. We posted discussions around topics that resonated with me, like avoiding the sun because we didn’t want to get too dark, and people from all different backgrounds — Asian, Black, Latinx — would leave comments about similar experiences. And we all had the same number-one beauty concern: dark circles. So it was a no-brainer: We made Huestick, a color-correcting crayon that can also be an eye, cheek, and lip color, and the line grew from there. We all have more in common than we know and I wanted to celebrate that and unify people.”

Courtesy of brand

Live Tinted Huestick, $24 (Shop Now) 

Nigella Miller, Founder of Afra

Nigella Miller

Kat Morgan

“When I was a child, my cousins and I would fall into these moments of doing each other’s hair while spending time together — we didn’t realize it was so precious. Hair plays a huge part in Black culture and my family’s hair

Read more

PETA Fashion Awards 2020: Celebrities & Brands Praised For Cruelty-Free Fashion

Our demand for ethical fashion has never been greater. Finally, consumers are asking where and how their clothes were made, and at whose expense? As the fur industry comes under fire for its worrying link to COVID-19, and as the government moves to ban the sale of fur within our borders once we leave the EU in January, sustainable and cruelty-free fashion is at the top of the industry’s agenda.

Each year, the PETA Fashion Awards celebrate the household style names and progressive brands making big statements for animals.

In the ‘Progress in Retail Moment’, praised brands included Valentino, Marks & Spencer, Next, New Look, and Uniqlo, all of whom banned alpaca from their collections.

The ‘Progress in Luxury Moment’ came courtesy of Mulberry, PVH Corp (who own brands including Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein), Paul Smith, and SMCP Group (who own Parisian labels like Sandro, Maje and Claudie Pierlot), all of whom banned exotic skins this year.

Stella McCartney has created the world’s first faux fur that’s *actually* sustainable and the fashion industry just breathed a big sigh of relief

Queen Elizabeth II also famously went fur-free, resulting in the ‘Most Iconic Moment’, while the ‘Best Celebrity Collection’ award went to Catherine Zeta-Jones and her collaboration with Butterfly Twists on a range of vegan shoes.

The ‘Most Wanted Award’ went to Telfar for its sought-after vegan leather bags, and the ‘Collaboration Award’ was won by Dr Martens for its vegan collection with Marc Jacobs. Stella McCartney was awarded ‘Best Catwalk Moment’ for bringing an animal rights message to Fashion Week, reminding everyone that the skins we see in fashion shows come from animals.

Stella McCartney has created the world’s first faux fur that’s *actually* sustainable and the fashion industry just breathed a big sigh of relief

“The hottest trend in fashion is compassion,” says PETA Director of Corporate Projects Yvonne Taylor. “As today’s designers and consumers are embracing ethically produced materials that no animal had to suffer and die for, it’s clear that the future of fashion is vegan.”

Other winners include Henrik Vibskov, winning ‘Best Down-Free Collection’ for its range of coats with Ecodown® recycled-polyester filler; FABORG, which nabbed the ‘Innovation Award’ for Weganool, a plant-based vegan wool; and Piferi, winner of the ‘Vegan Luxury Award’ for its high-end vegan shoes. Former British Fur Trade Association CEO Mike Moser was given a ‘Change of Heart Award’ for his decision to shun the fur trade and join the Fur-Free Britain campaign, calling on the UK government to ban fur sales.

Source Article

Read more

How Fashion Brands Can Achieve Inclusion Through Design

Fashion is about representing your identity, in whatever way that manifests. The challenge, for some, is that the clothes on the shelves don’t always adequately reflect them.

This is especially true within minority groups, plus-size consumers, transgender communities and those who simply don’t align with gender stereotypes. Too frequently, fashion for these groups is about form fitting into pre-set normative standards. However, fitting into those standards leads to a constant dialogue of subtle self-hate.

Several celebrities have helped bring these underserved communities to the forefront and break through stereotypes. Lizzo, for example, wears what she wants at every size, not what others think she should. She works out and eats healthy, even though some of those who comment on her Instagram page think otherwise. Her story particularly resonates with me, as I am a cyclist who has biked 545 miles four times from San Francisco to Los Angeles but certainly don’t look like a chiseled athlete.

And therein lies the issue. Many athletic women and men who don’t look like Michael Phelps or Simone Biles are not represented by fitness apparel models. In addition, these consumers can’t find athletic wear in their sizes. This leads these audiences to think of shopping itself as a traumatic experience, one that diminishes their confidence rather than empowering them. In addition, this lack of body representation seems to suggest the confines of what being an athlete is and isn’t, limiting who can be included based on body type alone.

Some brands are shifting to ensure marginalized communities are better represented. Last week, the athletic apparel company Superfit Hero shifted entirely to phase out their smaller sizes and extend through 7X, thereby offering plus-size fitness apparel only. The brand didn’t simply offer a larger range of sizes but instead decided to focus more wholeheartedly on the needs of an underserved community.

Diversity of body types has been linked to the LGBTQ+ community as Jonny Cota, Amazon Prime Video’s Making the Cut winner, reflected that “a fundamental aspect of ‘queer power’ is body positivity and appreciating all bodies.” Some brands are running strong in this direction.

Nik Kacy designs a luxury footwear brand that is gender-free, offering designs that help individuals across the entire gender spectrum more effectively express themselves. As clothing is a way of helping some trans people address gender dysmorphia, the need for clothing that adequately reflects their own identity is critically important.

Last but certainly not least, fashion still has a long way to go in offering options for racially diverse communities. This past summer, some brands felt they were solving the problem by serving up Black Lives Matter social posts without truly addressing the lack of Black models, designers, photographers and executive representation at the brands themselves.

The lack of diversity in fashion is on a par with a lack of inclusion when it comes to defining beauty in the consumer marketplace. The impact of this can be fully realized from visual representations that do the exact opposite. For example, in

Read more