PSYKHE Uses AI to Recommend Luxury Clothing Brands on Cheddar

Algorithms seem to be dictating just about every facet of life these days, including what you pick out of your closet, and online-shopping platform, PSYKHE, is using a program of psychological profiling to create style recommendations.

When customers sign up, they are instructed to take the big five personality test, assessing personal preferences, which creates the profile.

“So essentially, the big five is the most robust and respected model in psychology. You end up essentially, from 1 to 100 in each of these five scales, resulting in a really specific composite score,” Anabel Maldonado, PSYKHE founder and CEO, told cheddar. 

Once a customer has completed the test, they can explore their specially curated shopping experience. Over time, the algorithm will improve at making selections that best suit your personality, Maldonado added. 

While concerns have grown over the years regarding human bias entering these kinds of algorithms, Maldonado explained that a somewhat diverse staff worked on the initial training set for the artificial intelligence and that the system’s ability to learn shopping tendencies over time can hopefully ensure that a diverse customer base is being served.

She also said that the system’s ability to track dislikes or rejected suggestions is “almost as valuable, if not more,” than understanding what a customer does like because a wider variety of options are available.

“Currently the status-quo is that you look at dwell time, and clicks, and purchase history. We don’t really feel that works as well, especially purchase history,” Maldonado noted.

PSYKHE looks to avoid repetitive suggestions or similar recommendations that have already been purchased, according to the CEO. And, while PSYKHE is just the latest venture for Maldonado, she plans to expand the brand beyond clothing, using the same artificial intelligence.

“The interesting thing is the relationships between your big five scores and your preferences, health outcomes, behavior, music preference, really a variety of things is what makes the technology so valuable,” she said.

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Thirteen Lune Is the One-Stop-Shop For Your Favorite Black Beauty Brands

As the founder of her beauty brand, Nyakio Greico—who founded Nyakio™️ Beauty—knows a thing or two about underrepresentation. Black beauty founders rarely get shelf space in popular retailers or are sometimes relegated to spaces often overlooked or ignored by shoppers. So Greico and Patrick Herning (founder and CEO of e-commerce platform 11 Honoré) came up with a solution: Thirteen Lune, an online destination created to encourage the discovery of brands owned by Black and Brown beauty founders.

Upon arrival on the site, the brand’s mission stares you in the face: “Beyond Skin, Beyond Beauty, Beyond Barriers— Beauty products transcend race, gender identity, and age via the world’s first fully inclusive beauty platform.” Products are divided into three categories—skin, body, and hair and fall under three pillars:

  • Products made by Black and Brown founders that cater to all skin tones
  • Products that treat Black and Brown skin but are not exactly Black-owned
  • “Ally brands” that have made a conscious effort to be inclusive in their offerings and beyond

“I love being a beauty founder and am committed to helping other Black and Brown beauty founders realize success,” Greico says in a statement. “Over the last 18 years, I have faced challenges as well as gained valuable experiences that allow me to give these founders the support they deserve and on a bigger stage. There is so much talent that is not being recognized at the level that it needs to be. This is an opportunity to elevate these founders and to address the much bigger issue of alleviating systemic racism by building generational wealth in our communities. Change won’t happen unless we work in tandem to achieve this goal.”

To start, Thirteen Lune launches with 13 brands: Afro Pick, Beija Flor Naturals, Buttah Skin, Bomba Curls, Charlotte Mensah, Dehiya Beauty, Gilded Body, HyperSkin, Lauren Napier Beauty, Liha Beauty, Marie Hunter Beauty, Skot Beaute, and The Established. When you’re not shopping, you can peruse the site’s blog section titled Shop Talk, where there are accompanying stories and interviews on the founders and brands housed on the site.

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Thirteen Lune Is the New Beauty Site Putting Black- and Brown-Owned Brands Front and Center

Thirteen Lune, the new site that curates products from Black and Brown-owned beauty brands, feels so necessary in this moment that you might suspect it had been fast-tracked over the past months, as the pandemic dealt a harsh blow to Black businesses and America faced a racial reckoning. But the idea for the shopping platform actually started a year and a half ago, when co-founders Nyakio Grieco and Patrick Herning met for the first time. “We talked about various ways that we could collaborate and work together to really expand on this concept of inclusivity,” Grieco told Vogue over the phone from Los Angeles. “We saw how there is still so much work to be done within this industry.”

Grieco has been working in the beauty industry for 18 years. After leaving her job at Creative Artists Agency, where she discovered her deep love for beauty working with actresses on sets, she founded Nyakio Beauty in 2002, inspired by her Kenyan roots. “My grandmother taught me my first beauty secret, using Kenyan coffee beans and sugar cane rods that she grew on her farm as exfoliants, at eight years old. It really stuck with me,” Grieco remembers of her first visit to Kenya. When she approached her twenties, Greico realized that “Africa was always very underrepresented within premium beauty. So I decided to leave my job and bottle my grandmother’s coffee scrubs.”

Nyakio Grieco

Courtesy of Thirteen Lune

Patrick Herning

Courtesy of Thirteen Lune

Partnering with Herning (the co-founder of size-inclusive retailer 11 Honoré), Grieco is continuing her mission of making the beauty space even more inclusive of underrepresented cultures through Thirteen Lune. In a nod to its name—inspired by the fact that 13 is an honored number in Kenyan culture, and that there are 13 moons in an astrological moon cycle—the site launches today with a total of 13 stand-out brands, all owned by people of color. Buttah Skin, for example, was founded by model Dorion Renaud, who was inspired by the power of raw, organic shea butter. Bomba Curls is a nourishing natural hair-care brand based around generational Dominican beauty secrets. UK-based Liha Beauty combines Yoruba tradition with English aromatherapy for its hero moisturizing Idan oil. Grieco and her team were deep in the vetting process when protests—and resultant consumer activism—began this summer. “I went through a lot of those Black and POC-owned beauty brand lists that were going around this summer, buying the products and then seeing how they work on my skin and hair and on my daughter as well,” Greico says. When it came to reaching out to her chosen brands, Grieco was mostly met with resounding yesses. When she explained her mission to center minority-owned brands rather than leaving consumers to comb through major retailer sites, she often heard exclamations like, “Finally, something like this exists!”

A preview of Thirteen Lune

Photo: Courtesy of Thirteen Lune

After its initial launch, Thirteen Lune will be expanding its list of brand offerings. Grieco also hopes to

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The Best Sexy Lingerie And Cozy Loungewear Brands

When stay-at-home began, women quickly traded out their micro-skirts and Amina Muaddi heels for worn-in tees and cotton joggers.

Luxury lingerie brands, however, began to emerge as an unpredictable COVID chameleon, reporting a noticeable uptick in their lacier and more provocative sales. For some brands like Agent Provocateur, the more risqué styles like leather playsuits and bondage accessories began tracking higher-than-usual sales, too. Last week, Zion Market Research reported that the women’s lingerie market, which was valued at USD 35.9 billion in 2017, is anticipated to grow over 10% by next year — remaining largely unaffected by the global pandemic.

While temperatures continue to drop and stay-at-home orders resurface, coziness and comfort are reclaiming their role as wardrobe’s ringleader. But whether comfort is defined by a lace bodysuit and silk knickers or cashmere pants and a pima cotton hoodie — well, that’s a personal decision. Whichever you decide, these brands are the very best.

La Perla

The brand that is almost as ubiquitous for luxury lingerie as Clorox is for bleach. La Perla slowly and exponentially swallows their competition like a sexy, lace-wearing Venus flytrap. The French lingerie maker reported an uptick of 200% in sales between April and May of 2020. With collections like Petit Macramé and La Perla Maison, their timeless pieces show no signs of slowing down.

SKATIE

The eponymous Venice-based swim and activewear brand’s new loungewear collection is the de facto uniform for L.A. women. Built on a bedrock of sustainability, SKATIE pieces are made in L.A. from as many recycled materials and responsibly-sourced fabrics as opportunity presents. Based on the founder commandeering her husband’s loungewear, the new collection’s hero joggers are made to fit oversized and ever-cozy.

Kiki De Montparnasse

Confusion and heartbreak struck the minds of many when Kiki De Montparnasse suddenly closed their doors in 2016. But when the brand relaunched online, fans rejoiced. With a sexy array of both lingerie and clothing that looks like lingerie, the edgy brand is known for bringing out the wearer’s wild side.

Journelle

A luxury lingerie store in New York City, Journelle is a multi-brand destination for intimates. In addition to the store’s own luxury line, brands like Fleur of England and Hanro can be found on their digital shelves.

Coco de Mer

A niche London-based lingerie and pleasure destination, Coco de Mer began as a small brick-and-mortar boutique in Convent Gardens. Specializing in sensual styles, they are too, a multi-destination for sexy, niche brands and more erotic pieces.

Brunello Cucinelli

For a brand like Brunello Cucinelli, or just “Bruno” as its referred to by its wealthy wearers, the term ‘loungewear’ is not in their lexicon. The infamous cashmere sweatpants are instead referred to as ‘travelwear’, because it’s only when traveling to St. Moritz for Snow

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the mixed bag of Philip Green brands

Arcadia has gone into administration, completing Sir Philip Green’s fall from the king of the high street. Here we look at the tycoon’s brands from a fashion perspective:



a woman posing for a picture: Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images



a woman posing for a picture: British supermodel Kate Moss poses in a window as she promotes her range of clothing at a Top Shop store in London in 2007.


© Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images
British supermodel Kate Moss poses in a window as she promotes her range of clothing at a Top Shop store in London in 2007.

Topshop

Bright, buzzy and big, Topshop was once as agenda-setting as the high street got. At the Oxford Street HQ, every square inch was filled with the latest catwalk trend, a fashion-forward accessory or, randomly, a wall full of pick and mix. Its denim range was gamechanging and it collaborations were inspired and occasionally on point (Kate Moss, Jonathan Saunders). Yes, Topshop suggests the shopper has the attention span of a gnat, but it also feels truly aspirational, like your life could be changed by one purchase. Despite some of its shine being taken away in recent years by Primark and online stores, Topshop remains the most fashion forward of the big high street stores.

Wallis



a group of people standing in front of a building: A Wallis shop window. Photograph: PjrTravel/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
A Wallis shop window. Photograph: PjrTravel/Alamy

Pitched somewhere south of sensible chic, if Topshop was Fleabag, Wallis is the uptight, sensible older sister. With no-nonsense clean lines and work-centric looks, Wallis’s clothes are dispassionate and sober. The brand’s petite range was important, catering to a demographic that was sometimes ignored on the high street. But in general, the clothes are hard to get too excited about.

Evans

Truly pioneering in its plus-size ranges, Evans has been democratising high street fashion since the 30s when the first branch opened. Evans doesn’t put customers in predictable boxes – its range of styles importantly shows a world beyond “frumpy”.

Topman

For a period, Topman managed to inject the usually glacial high street menswear scene with some much-needed fun and excitement. It also seamlessly bridged the gap between “high street” and “high end” with a place at the London fashion week table and collaborations with people such as the designer Charlie Casely-Hayford and spin-off ranges such as AAA and Topman Signature. What Topman lacks in durable basics it makes up for in whip-smart seasonal trends and occasional out-of-the-box collaborations.

Burton

Burton was founded in 1904 and was responsible for making three-piece suits for soldiers returning from the second world war. And while it will always be known for its all-in-one suit – for every occasion from weddings to job interviews – Burton is coy when inching out of the tailoring realm. Its daywear always has a slightly awkward feel about it: clothes for a dad who “still has it”.

Miss Selfridge

Pre-internet, Miss Selfridge was the coming-of-clothing-age store for young girls. But recently Miss Selfridge ploughed the same ground as Boohoo and Pretty Little Things: play hard, working girl chic 2.0, although it does it in a much less controversial way.

Dorothy Perkins

Once a huge brand, with about 350 shops at one point. It

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Shop These Cool Asian-Owned Clothing Brands, and You’ll Be the Most Stylish Person

There are an endless amount of clothing brands out there to shop from, but if you’re tired of fast fashion and want to give some love to other labels, check out these amazing Asian-owned ones. And yes, we’re aware that the word “Asian” can lump together vastly different countries and cultures, so we included a mix of brands that are Chinese-, Japanese-, Nepalese-, Vietnamese-, Taiwanese-, Indian-, and Pakistani-owned (and more!), so you can see the variety of all these amazingly cool designers and their creations. From colorful knitwear to luxe silks, there’s something here for everyone. Also, some designer brands are more established while others on this list are relatively new and up-and-coming, but all of them warrant your attention for their unique and downright stunning designs. Keep scrolling below for 28 Asian-owned clothing—and accessory!—brands that you’ll want to start shopping at immediately.

If you want to continue to show your support to BIPOC-owned brands, especially for the upcoming holiday gift-giving season, click the links to check out these Black-owned brands, Indian fashion designers, and Latina-owned businesses. Now go forth and browse through all these awesome labels!

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28 Asian-Owned Clothing Brands to Shop in 2020

asian owned clothing brands

courtesy

There are an endless amount of clothing brands out there to shop from, but if you’re tired of fast fashion and want to give some love to other labels, check out these amazing Asian-owned ones. And yes, we’re aware that the word “Asian” can lump together vastly different countries and cultures, so we included a mix of brands that are Chinese-, Japanese-, Nepalese-, Vietnamese-, Taiwanese-, Indian-, and Pakistani-owned (and more!), so you can see the variety of all these amazingly cool designers and their creations. From colorful knitwear to luxe silks, there’s something here for everyone. Also, some designer brands are more established while others on this list are relatively new and up-and-coming, but all of them warrant your attention for their unique and downright stunning designs. Keep scrolling below for 28 Asian-owned clothing—and accessory!—brands that you’ll want to start shopping at immediately.

If you want to continue to show your support to BIPOC-owned brands, especially for the upcoming holiday gift-giving season, click the links to check out these Black-owned brands, Indian fashion designers, and Latina-owned businesses. Now go forth and browse through all these awesome labels!

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1

YanYan Knits

Your wardrobe will be so colorful and cozy thanks to this brand founded by former Rag & Bone knitwear director Phyllis Chan and Hong Kong designer Suzzie Chung. The name “YanYan” means “everyone” in Cantonese, FYI.

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2

Delaroq

Upgrade your accessory game with this bag brand by designer Jennifer Lyu. It features croc-embossed designs, structured tote bags, and chic crossbody styles; plus, it offers some super cute knit beanies, too.

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3

Sandy Liang

Liang’s signature fleece outerwear is a covetable fall and winter staple, and she’s also done cool collabs with Vans and Spongebob Squarepants. The New York-native is definitely a designer that you’ll be seeing more of.

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4

Adeam

Japanese designer Hanako Maeda founded Adeam (her last name backwards!), and the line is inspired by both New York City and Tokyo since she constantly traveled back and forth between the two cities growing up. She recently collaborated with tennis star Naomi Osaka on a new collection.

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5

Altuzarra

Both Chinese and French, Joseph Altuzarra studied ballet for years before he got into the fashion industry. He founded his namesake label in 2008 and his pieces have a modern aesthetic that are chic and timeless.

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6

Prabal Gurung

Born in Singapore and raised in Nepal, Prabal Gurung has so many romantic, dreamy pieces like this Cinderella-esque strapless dress. He founded the brand in 2009 and has dressed countless A-listers since, including Michelle Obama and Kate Middleton.

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7

3.1 Phillip Lim

Created by founders Phillip Lim and Wen Zhou, the brand debuted in 2005 at New York Fashion Week and has since expanded into other categories like bags, shoes, and menswear.

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8

Derek Lam

The Chinese-American designer was born in San Francisco and launched his namesake label in 2003. His alternate

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8 women-owned brands you can support today (and every day, really)

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

If you want to be a bit more intentional with where and how you spend your money this holiday season, how about showing women-owned businesses some love? From food to sustainable clothing, women are changing the game in so many incredible ways.

If you’re on the hunt for incredible deals, don’t let that deter you from shopping women-owned business. Here are 8 women-owned brands, both big and small, hosting must-shop sales right now

1. The Essentials, $59.50 (Orig. $85)

Credit: Act + Acre

2. Hit Refresh Set, $49 (Orig. $55)

Credit: Alleyoop

3. The Lodge Trio, $104 (Orig. $144)

Credit: bkr

  • Reusable water bottles and lip balms are all 25 percent off at bkr. Plus, you’ll receive a free Spiked Bubbly 500 mL bottle on orders over $75.

4. Nail Artist In Big Night Out, $14 (Orig. $28)

Credit: Emilie Heathe

5. The Bliss, $45

Credit: Harper Wilde

  • Need new undergarments? Hit up Harper Wilde’s buy more, save more sale. Take 35 percent off orders over $150, 25 percent off orders over $125, 20 percent off orders over $100 and 15 percent off all other orders.

6. The Exercise Dress, $90 (Orig. $100)

Credit: Outdoor Voices

7. Celestial Divinity: Risque Rose & Matterance Duo, $114

Credit: Pat McGrath

8. Faux Leather Moto Leggings, $88 (Orig. $110)

Credit: Spanx

If you enjoyed this story, check out this top-rated hair growth shampoo that’s 20 percent off on Amazon right now.

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This warm and cozy teddy coat is affordable enough to buy in multiple colors

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How Fair Wear Is Working With Fashion Brands To Protect The Rights Of Garment Workers Around The World

Millions of garment workers around the world face poverty and human rights violations every day. Supply chains are very complicated, and there are still many places where things can go wrong. Most clothing brands don’t own their factories, but they do have a lot of influence over how factories treat workers.

Fair Wear is an independent multi-stakeholder organisation that works with garment brands, garment workers and industry influencers to improve labor conditions in garment factories.

In particular, Fair Wear works with some of the world’s leading fashion brands like Acne, Nudie, Katherine Hamnett, Filippa K and more, who take their responsibilities seriously, and want to learn how to use their influence to make life better for the people who make their clothing.

I caught up with Lotte Schuurman, Fair Wear’s Head of Communications to learn more about their work.

Afdhel Aziz: Hi Lotte, welcome! Please tell us a little about the purpose and work of Fair Wear?

Lotte Schuurman: At Fair Wear, we’re pushing to create a garment industry that is fair for all.

For a very long time already, we have been producing clothes the same way, like we always have. The consumer is underpaying, and the worker is underpaid. Due to the ‘race to the bottom’, margins are too low.

We know there’s a better way to make clothes. A way in which workers feel safe and respected and receive a salary that is enough to provide for their families. We’re pushing to make this the new normal.

Together with garment brands and other industry players, we work on better labour conditions for the men and women who make our clothes. We’re tackling complex problems, like payment of a living wage and ending gender-based violence, by uncovering new solutions and driving step-by-step improvements that create real change for the people who work in garment factories.

Aziz: Do you think Fast Fashion is having its Fast Food moment of crisis? Is there a discrepancy between what consumers say and what they do?

Schuurman: We’re still buying a lot of clothes, although the COVID-19 crisis is changing that. A Deloitte study (April 2019) found that American consumers are now spending a smaller portion of their income on clothing. The spending as a percentage of the total household expenses has been cut in half since 1987, declining from 5 percent to 2 percent. However, this does not necessarily imply a disinterest in clothing or fashion on the part of the consumer. In fact, there has been a continued increase in the number of units of apparel sold, consistent with the overall growth rate in retail. Clothing has become cheaper. And this is happening while low wages and poor working conditions still hit the news on a regular basis.

On the other hand, we also see more interest in sustainable fashion. Research (Jan. 2020) shows that consumers are looking for greater

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Sustainable Brands: Black Friday 2020 Sales

(CNN) —  

The Black Friday shopping frenzy is officially upon us. There are thousands of sales going on throughout the week all over the internet, but if you’re shopping for some new clothes, you might be doing more damage to the earth than you’d think. The fashion industry is notoriously horrible for the environment, so what’s the best way to shop responsibly this year?

The easiest answer is to keep your clothes for as long as possible and buy used. Sites like ThredUp, Poshmark and Depop allow you to sell and buy clothes online, like a fashion-exclusive Craigslist. Or, if those aren’t your style, you can even rent clothes from services such as Rent The Runway.

However, if you’re set on buying new clothes, there are certain brands that are doing the work to ensure their products are more sustainable, whether the clothes themselves are recyclable, or they’re crafted with recycled materials.

In the end, the most important thing is to really do your research to see if a brand meets your own sustainability standards. Below, we’ve listed out some of our favorite sustainable fashion brands, many of which have Black Friday sales live now.

Girlfriend Collective

Girlfriend Collective

PHOTO:
Girlfriend Collective

If you’re shopping for activewear, it’ll be pretty hard to find a more eco-friendly option than Girlfriend Collective. It uses 100% recyclable packaging and tons of recycled materials in its products. We tried out some Girlfriend Collective leggings ourselves, and thought they were fantastic. Dive into the brand’s sustainability efforts on its site, and while you’re there, check out its Black Friday sale, where you can get 30% off sitewide through December 1.

Naadam

Naadam responsibly sources and creates luxuriously soft and stylish cashmere from sheep herded in Mongolia. On its site, you’ll find the famous $75 cashmere sweater (which always seems to be selling out) and the brand’s first ever Social and Environmental Impact Report. Naadam also has some lofty goals for 2025, including paying a living wage across its entire supply chain, using recycled materials and going carbon neutral. Right now, you can save 40% on select styles for men and women with code BLACKFRI40.

Patagonia

Patagonia

PHOTO:
Patagonia

The outdoors brand creates a ton of its clothes with recycled materials, which is a huge plus, but a big reason why Patagonia is a great brand for the earth is its 1% for the Planet tax, which it imposes on itself to provide support to environmental nonprofits around the globe.

Reformation

Reformation

PHOTO:
Reformation

Los Angeles-based Reformation puts a huge focus on sustainability — and it’s not quiet about it. You can check out the brand’s initiatives and progress in making itself cleaner and more sustainable right on its site. And now, you can save 30% off sitewide to stock up on dresses and more.

Allbirds

That’s right, Allbirds doesn’t only make shoes, the brand has recently ventured into apparel. The cozy knits are made from merino wool and are tested for harmful substances according to the strict global criteria of Standard

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