29-0 loss reopens debate on women’s football in Brazil

By Leonardo Benassatto



a man standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil


© Reuters/AMANDA PEROBELLI
A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil

TABOAO DA SERRA, Brazil (Reuters) – When the women’s team of Taboao da Serra lost a league match 29-0 last month it looked like things could hardly get much worse for the small club based outside Brazil’s biggest city Sao Paulo.

The horrific loss made headlines around the world but it wasn’t the final straw. They lost their next three games 14-0, 10-0 and 16-0 and were eliminated from the Sao Paulo state championship at the group stage.



a boy holding a football ball: A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil


© Reuters/AMANDA PEROBELLI
A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil

The results sparked yet another debate about the competitiveness of the women’s game in Brazil. The backlash – and of course the sexist ridicule – was even more predictable.

When we lost “they said it looks like the whole team has COVID-19, don’t bother playing, those kind of things, you know,” said captain Lohane Ferreira.



a man holding a football ball on a field: A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil


© Reuters/AMANDA PEROBELLI
A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil

They were “talking as if football was only for men, that women should stay at home washing dishes, like men’s slaves. Most of the players get these kind of messages.”

The results and the messages reflect the challenges faced by women footballers in Brazil.

The South American nation is famous as the spiritual home of football; the birthplace of Pele, Ronaldo Nazario, and Neymar; and the only country to win the men’s World Cup five times.

The women’s team are also competitive on the world stage but while top players like Marta, the only woman to win the World Player of the Year award six times, can make a comfortable living overseas, the majority who play in Brazil struggle.



a person sitting in a chair talking on a cell phone: A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil


© Reuters/AMANDA PEROBELLI
A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil

Even senior clubs face accusations of not offering their women’s teams the same equipment or facilities as the men’s sides and equal pay is a distant dream.



a group of people looking at a phone: A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil


© Reuters/AMANDA PEROBELLI
A look at Taboao da Serra, a soccer club that lost 29-0 to Sao Paulo shows the inequality of sport in Brazil

Taboao only secured a training pitch three days before this year’s league kicked off and their players shoulder almost all the responsibility for preparing, training and kitting themselves out.

“We don’t have any other kind of help, not even boots,” said midfielder Alieni Baciega Roschel.

“All the players have to pay for their own equipment. They pay their own way to get to training. Every one of them spends between 20 reais and 30 reais ($3.77 and $5.66) a day on transport, some take two or even three hours to get home, some

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Liam Cook: The Englishman coaching Brazil women’s cricket team

Liam Cook coaching the Brazil women's cricket team
Brazil won the South American Championship for the first time in 2015

Liam Cook had only been in Brazil for a few hours when he realised interest in cricket might be greater than he first thought.

“I was sitting in a coffee shop and I spotted a Somerset cricket shirt coming down the road,” he says. “I was thinking: ‘There can’t be a Somerset shirt in Pocos de Caldas.’

“The guy nodded at me. He had ‘C Overton’ on the back of his shirt. I thought: ‘There you go, I’ve arrived from Devon and there is a name of a Devon lad on the back of a cricket shirt in Brazil.'”

Working with the Brazil women’s team would not have been high on the list of probable outcomes when Cook, a club cricketer, quit his job with an energy company at the age of 26 in a bid to forge a career as a coach.

The opportunity came from a street cricket tournament in London during the men’s 2019 World Cup. It is what led Cook, now 32 with experience of setting up his own coaching business and working with the Kent women’s set-up, to Brazil for the first time in February.

His first trip was cut short by the coronavirus pandemic, but he returned at the end of the UK summer. Although the rough idea is to divide time equally between his business at home and Brazil, plans to leave have been pushed back.

Cook’s only previous knowledge of Brazilian cricket was meeting Roberta Moretti Avery, the women’s captain, who asked for coaching sessions when she was on holiday in the UK.

“I knew Roberta was a good player, but I had no idea what the others would be like,” says Cook. “When I watched them play, I was very surprised. They were very raw. Their bowling actions were different and they all knew how to hit a ball a long way.

“They didn’t look perfect, but the game is moving away from what looks good to what is effective.”

Brazil’s women sit 27th in the world rankings – bar West Indies, they are the highest-placed team in the Americas.

In January 2019, 14 players were given central contracts by Cricket Brazil. They train in Pocos de Caldas, a small city 250km north of Sao Paulo, where the mayor is happy to invest in cricket and boasts that it has more players than football.

Some players are recruited because they have excelled in other sports. Others have been introduced to the game through projects in schools and community centres. It’s not just about the elite level, either, with children from all backgrounds being encouraged to play.

“Kids that might be off doing things they shouldn’t be are staying on after school to play cricket,” says Cook. “The more they get into that, the more opportunities they get to play, the less likely they are to take the wrong path.

“One of the boys, Derek, aged about 16 or 17,

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How mobile shopping habits differ around the world, from Brazil to Australia

by Narongsak (Tek) Thongpapanl, Abdul Rehman Ashraf, Ali Anwar, Luciano Lapa, The Conversation

How mobile shopping habits differ around the world, from Brazil to Australia
Research show comfort levels, value perceptions and motivations when it comes to m-commerce differ depending on whether consumers live in developed or developing countries. Credit: Pexels

Mobile commerce (m-commerce) platforms often operate in several international markets. M-commerce managers often focus on which features should be kept constant and which should be adapted to specific characteristics of national markets.


Consider, for instance, an m-commerce platform designed for Australian consumers. To what extent should it be adapted when it’s introduced in Brazil? Are the tastes and needs of consumers in Australia similar to those of consumers in Brazil?

These are the questions that motivate and drive a series of multinational m-commerce studies conducted by Goodman School of Business researchers and their global colleagues.

By using and interacting with an m-commerce platform, consumers form their perceptions of its positive and negative attributes based on value perceptions. Our team of researchers have found that value perceptions fall under five major categories when it comes to m-commerce.

Five value categories

To illustrate, imagine that Jackie wants to buy a new bicycle. She downloads a retailer’s app to search for product information (informational value). If she finds a good deal, the app may help her save money (monetary value). Jackie then thanks her friend who recommended the app, and now they have something in common to discuss (social value). In addition, Jackie did not have to visit several retailers to decide what to buy, so the app also helped her save time (convenience value). Finally, Jackie can check off buying a new bicycle from her to-do list (performance value).

Consumers are motivated to use the m-commerce platform according to these value perceptions. These motivations can be either hedonic and utilitarian. While some consumers are motivated to use mobile platforms platform because they’re enjoyable and fun, others are motivated because the platform is functional and efficient.

These value perceptions and motivations explain how consumers use m-commerce. For some, the use of m-commerce has an intentional nature in that they must think about whether using it to fulfill a certain goal is a good option.

For instance, when ordering food, these consumers may take some time to decide whether to order from the app or call the restaurant directly. In contrast, others tend to have a more habitual use of m-commerce in that they do not even have to think about what to do. For those consumers, opening the app and ordering food is an automatic process that does not need much consideration.

M-commerce appreciation

Based on a survey of almost 2,000 consumers across multiple countries, we have found that virtually all consumers appreciate m-commerce as a source of informational, social, performance and convenience value. Surprisingly, except for consumers in India and Brazil, consumers do not seem to rely on m-commerce because it helps them save money.

We find that consumers’ m-commerce experience can be vastly different depending on their “m-commerce readiness” stages. Everyone has

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