WAG’s reworked gift shop brighter and better connected


The new gift shop at the Winnipeg Art Gallery will give visitors a glimpse at what the future holds for the 49-year-old downtown landmark.

The 2,520-square-foot Gallery Shop, designed by Michael Maltzan Architects (which also designed the Inuit Art Centre) and Cibinet Architecture, opens to the public Saturday. It sits at a transition area between past and future, between the original building and the Inuit Art Centre, where construction continues.

It’s a stark difference, one Stephen Borys, the WAG’s director and chief executive officer, says is a milestone in the phased unveiling of spaces that will transform of the gallery.

The Gallery Shop’s main feature will be its ability to provide window-shopping opportunities for pedestrians strolling down Memorial Boulevard.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The Gallery Shop’s main feature will be its ability to provide window-shopping opportunities for pedestrians strolling down Memorial Boulevard.

Visitors can’t see the new addition’s interior yet, but a visit to the Gallery Shop suggests increased natural light will make the Inuit Art Centre far brighter than the original building. In comparison to the Eckhardt Hall, the large main-floor space that has welcomed visitors to the WAG since 1971, the Inuit Art Centre may resemble a shiny day in the Arctic, like sunlight reflecting off a snowy landscape.

Construction for the Inuit Art Centre scattered most of the WAG gift shop’s inventory. Sherri Van Went, the WAG’s retail operations manager, says the gallery sent many of its items for sale to its [email protected] location in the meantime.

“For almost two years we’ve been working out of a temporary boutique on the third level, so that put us in a position to reduce our offerings,” Van Went says. “This is incredibly exciting to be back on the main floor, with visibility to the street, which is something we’ve never had before. It’s a complete game-changer for us.”

New vertical cabinets bolster the shop’s jewelry department.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

New vertical cabinets bolster the shop’s jewelry department.

The Gallery Shop’s main feature is its ability to provide window-shopping opportunities for pedestrians strolling down Memorial Boulevard. It also has its own entrance, but for today’s grand opening, it will serve as an exit only, as the WAG adapts the new space to the province’s COVID-19 regulations.

A small seating space exists in the gift shop as well. A café will be part of the Inuit Art Centre, and Van Went foresees visitors enjoying a coffee at the gift shop while gazing out at Memorial Boulevard.

The Gallery Shop also has new storage furniture, which visitors may overlook but is a big deal for any retail business. Vertical cabinets bolster the shop’s jewelry department, allowing for necklaces and dangling earrings to be better displayed and leaving more space in tabletop cabinets to display rings, bracelets and other small pieces.

Tabletop cabinets will display rings, bracelets and other small pieces.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Tabletop cabinets will display rings, bracelets and other small pieces.

For Winnipeg jeweller Jake Freeman, who creates necklaces and earrings with leather, caribou fur, bark and intricate beadwork, the new space means new opportunities to show her works.

The gift shop offers works from across

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