Microsoft Edge now has coupon and promo codes built in for online shopping

Microsoft is adding a new coupons feature to its Edge browser today. Coupons and promo codes will appear inside Edge as an alert when you’re shopping online, and they can be automatically applied to a basket when you’re ready to check out. The coupons feature also includes price comparisons, so if you’re shopping online, Edge can surface different retailers that might offer items at lower prices.



a close up of a camera


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Microsoft introduced price comparisons in Edge just weeks ago as part of its Collections feature, but this new coupon experience goes even further. It’s part of a big push by Microsoft to position Edge as the browser for online shopping, but the comparisons and coupons only work for US users of the browser right now.



graphical user interface, application, website: Coupons inside Microsoft Edge.


© Image: Microsoft
Coupons inside Microsoft Edge.

If you’re not interested in online shopping, Edge is also getting some more productivity improvements that are particularly useful for students. Microsoft is adding in the ability to annotate and add text notes to PDFs, a highly requested feature. And one of the top requested features, according to Microsoft, is making a return to Edge: inking. As part of the new screenshot tool, you’ll now be able to digitally ink and annotate screenshots.

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Microsoft is also adding the ability to capture a full webpage in a screenshot later this month. Most existing screenshot tools simply screenshot what you see without the ability to capture an entire webpage or scroll as you grab the screen. Microsoft’s new Edge screenshot tool will automatically scroll down a webpage so you can capture everything in a single image.

Finally, Word and Outlook will also handle copied URLs from Edge a lot more elegantly soon. Microsoft will shorten long links into friendly URLs when you copy links from the address bar in Edge and paste them into Word or Outlook. That’s useful if you don’t want to use bit.ly or another link shortening service, and you’ll also be able to switch back to the longer URL in the Word or Outlook context menus.

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Meet The Angel City Football Club And The Trailblazing Women That Built It

Uzo Aduba, Jennifer Garner, Eva Longoria, Natalie Portman and Jessica Chastain.

A line-up like that sounds like the makings of a powerhouse superhero project. And in many ways, that is exactly what this is. With the dedicated support of several of Hollywood’s leading ladies, the new Angel City Football Club is quickly becoming one of the most high-profile U.S. professional sports teams that is majority-woman founded, funded and led.

Natalie is an Angel City Founder alongside venture capital partner Kara Nortman, a duo that would eventually combine forces following Kara’s unforgettable experience at a professional women’s soccer game. “In 2015, I took my three daughters with my husband and my parents to the finals in Vancouver, the World Cup Finals. Basically, it was the most incredible experience as a sports fan in my life,” Kara recalls. “Then I literally could not find a jersey to buy. I went to nine stores in Vancouver and LA and could not find a U.S. Women’s National Team jersey with the player’s name on the back that I wanted. I just kind of got a ‘bee in my bonnet’ I guess you could say and was kind of perplexed that no one wanted to take my money. I often start talking about things that I find to be not right in the world and this seemed like one of them.”

As a result, Kara made it her mission to find people interested in women’s soccer. During that process, she was confronted with a mix of both enthusiasts and doubters as she expressed interest in making a change in the world of women’s professional sports. Kara’s relationship with Becca Roux, the Executive Director of the U.S. Women’s National Team Players Association, was a turning point in her search. While Becca taught Kara more about the sport, Kara taught Becca how to build more business around women’s soccer that could generate greater revenue.

When Kara and Natalie ultimately crossed paths, their interaction would become the spark that would lead to the creation of what Angel City is today. According to Kara, Natalie is a huge follower of women’s soccer and European men’s football. Kara says that Natalie suggested that she bring some of her Hollywood friends (Aduba, Garner, Longoria and Chastain) to a friendly game before the World Cup for additional visibility to women’s soccer. What began as a friendship between the two women with their similar hobbies and activism interests, would soon become a full-on business venture in August 2019 when Kara remembers Natalie texting her during one of their regular conversations saying Why don’t we buy a team?

The next major player in the formation of Angel City was Julie Uhrman. Kara and Julie play on a women in tech basketball team, where Kara told Julie about her World Cup experience, her talks with Natalie and their hopes of bringing a women’s professional team to Los Angeles. “Kara

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Tycoon ordered to tear down tennis court built without permission



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© Provided by Daily Mail
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The millionaire founder of clothes brand White Stuff has been told to tear down a two-storey garage, skate park and tennis court built without permission on a clifftop at a Devon beauty spot.

Sean Thomas made a retrospective application last year after a local resident complained about the structures that were built in 2016 behind his house at Gerston Point, in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the south of the county.

It was rejected by the district council, along with a proposal that involved planting 1,000 native trees. 



a car on a dirt track: White Stuff founder Sean Thomas has been ordered to tear down a two-storey double garage, a skate park and a tennis court (outlined in red) at his beauty spot mansion


© Provided by Daily Mail
White Stuff founder Sean Thomas has been ordered to tear down a two-storey double garage, a skate park and a tennis court (outlined in red) at his beauty spot mansion

Planners said the development was an ‘eyesore’.

Mr Thomas then submitted a new proposal in April this year which involved planting more than 1,000 native trees to ensure a ‘clear net biodiversity gain.’

But this proposal was rejected by a Council report on October 29th, which described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’.

Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England.



a large body of water with a mountain in the background: Council report on October 29th, described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’


© Provided by Daily Mail
Council report on October 29th, described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’



a close up of a green fence: Pictured here is the view of the tennis court looking towards the two-storey double garage with solar panelling


© Provided by Daily Mail
Pictured here is the view of the tennis court looking towards the two-storey double garage with solar panelling

In the planning refusal, the Council described the two-storey garage as an ‘inappropriate built form within this highly sensitive rural estuary location, resulting in significant adverse impacts to the natural beauty of the South Devon AONB’.

An enforcement team from the Council will now serve notice to Mr Thomas in an attempt to return the land to its former condition.

The fashion chain boss has up to six months to file an appeal.

The latest decision follows accusations from the South Hams Society that the council was ‘dragging its heels’ by not carrying out enforcement.



a large body of water: Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England


© Provided by Daily Mail
Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England

The council responded to the accusations by saying it had been talking to Mr Thomas ‘to try and resolve the issue’.

The house at Gerston Point has a history of run-ins with council planners. It was built after a controversial planning application in 2011 on the site of a bungalow formerly owned by the environmentalist Tony Soper, co-founder of the BBC’s famous Natural History Unit.

Mr Thomas and his wife later acquired a neighbouring strip of land on which they build the tennis court, skate park and garage.



a group of people standing in front of a store: Sean Thomas founded the White Stuff fashion brand in 1986 with George Treves while the pair were working in the French ski resort of Méribel.  Today, White Stuff has 151 stores across the UK


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sean Thomas founded the White Stuff fashion brand in 1986 with George Treves while the pair were working in the French ski

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White Stuff tycoon ordered to tear down tennis court built without permission at Devon beauty spot

Clothing tycoon is ordered to tear down tennis court and skate park built without permission at Devon beauty spot

  • Millionaire has been told to tear down a two-storey garage, skate park and tennis
  • Sean Thomas, founder of White Stuff clothes brand, built on Devon beauty spot
  • He made a retrospective planning application that was rejected by the council

The millionaire founder of clothes brand White Stuff has been told to tear down a two-storey garage, skate park and tennis court built without permission on a clifftop at a Devon beauty spot.

Sean Thomas made a retrospective application last year after a local resident complained about the structures that were built in 2016 behind his house at Gerston Point, in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the south of the county.

It was rejected by the district council, along with a proposal that involved planting 1,000 native trees. 

White Stuff founder Sean Thomas has been ordered to tear down a two-storey double garage, a skate park and a tennis court (outlined in red) at his beauty spot mansion

White Stuff founder Sean Thomas has been ordered to tear down a two-storey double garage, a skate park and a tennis court (outlined in red) at his beauty spot mansion

Planners said the development was an ‘eyesore’.

Mr Thomas then submitted a new proposal in April this year which involved planting more than 1,000 native trees to ensure a ‘clear net biodiversity gain.’

But this proposal was rejected by a Council report on October 29th, which described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’.

Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England.

Council report on October 29th, described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’

Council report on October 29th, described the development as an ‘unwelcome and incongruous intrusion into an undeveloped countryside location’

Pictured here is the view of the tennis court looking towards the two-storey double garage with solar panelling

Pictured here is the view of the tennis court looking towards the two-storey double garage with solar panelling

In the planning refusal, the Council described the two-storey garage as an ‘inappropriate built form within this highly sensitive rural estuary location, resulting in significant adverse impacts to the natural beauty of the South Devon AONB’.

An enforcement team from the Council will now serve notice to Mr Thomas in an attempt to return the land to its former condition.

The fashion chain boss has up to six months to file an appeal.

The latest decision follows accusations from the South Hams Society that the council was ‘dragging its heels’ by not carrying out enforcement.

Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England

Mr Thomas’s house is in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), which covers 337 square kilometres of south west England 

The council responded to the accusations by saying it had been talking to Mr Thomas ‘to try and resolve the issue’.

The house at Gerston Point has a history of run-ins with council planners. It was built after a controversial planning application in 2011 on the site of a bungalow formerly owned by the environmentalist Tony Soper, co-founder of the BBC’s famous Natural History

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How Kate Morris built an e-commerce empire



a woman posing for a picture: Adore Beauty Kate Morris


© Provided by Smart Company
Adore Beauty Kate Morris

Online beauty retailer Adore Beauty listed on the Australian Securities Exchange at midday today, 20 years after co-founder Kate Morris started the business in her garage. 

In what has been labelled one of the “hottest” floats of the year, the retailer’s stocks jumped by nine per cent on debut, with the stock first trading at $7.40. 

The initial public offering raised $269.5 million, based on an initial offer price of $6.75 a share. It valued the business at $614.8 million and gave it an opening market capitalisation of $635.3 million.

Most of the new funding — $229.5 million — will be raised via the sale of existing shares belonging to Adore Beauty, with Morris and co-founder James Height expected to receive $45.9 million each after selling 40% of their shares in the offer. 

Lessons from 20 years building an e-commerce empire

The ASX listing is the culmination of a long journey for Adore, which Morris has previously said was driven by a spirit of “no guts, no glory”. 

Starting out with just $12,000 borrowed from her boyfriend’s parents, Morris started the business from her garage in Murrumbeena and initially had what she calls “a store in the middle of the desert with no passing foot traffic”. 

Online shopping was a new frontier back in 1999 when she was getting started, but Morris used that initial investment to purchase a basic website and some stocks. She then set about approaching beauty brands, getting turned down by them all, until two small companies said yes. 

This was the start she needed, and momentum grew gradually from there. 

This focus on building the business step-by-step is still evident today, with the CEO saying the retailer has always focused on steady, and profitable, growth. 

“We grew carefully and profitably for many years, slowly building trust with beauty brands and consumers,” she said in her co-founder and executive director’s letter in the prospectus.

The strategy has always been a long-term one, says Morris, who also thanked customers for their “constant and honest feedback” which was used to build the business to where it is today.

“We believe that by staying true to our customers, brands, values and vision, we can weather the challenges, and take advantage of all the opportunities that time may bring,” she said.

The customer is at the heart of what Adore does, with the e-commerce retailer known for its speedy service — it offers free express shipping for orders within Australia over $50 — and wide product range of more than 200 brands.

The retailer was also an early adopter of mobile e-commerce and has committed to reducing its use of plastic, after hearing resounding feedback from its customers on the issue.

The values of Adore Beauty and Morris are prominent in how the business operates — from creating a Women in Tech scholarship, to offering domestic violence leave to employees.

And as a leader in the Australian e-commerce sector, Morris

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Ready, Set, Raise, an accelerator for women built by women, announces third class

In 2018, Leslie Feinzaig, the founder of Female Founders Alliance, launched a free, equity-free accelerator for women called Ready, Set, Raise. The goal was to provide under-networked female founders the coaching and connections needed to raise money.

This year, as funding for female founders drops to 2017 levels, Feinzaig realized why accelerators, hers included, might not work for women as well as they work for men: demo day. A common culminating event in most accelerators, demo day is an event where founders pitch to a room to investors, angels, and journalists with the hope of raising a round and landing some coverage.

“The truth is, you don’t raise a round based on a 5-minute, highly scripted, polished and practiced on-stage pitch,” Feinzaig continued. “You raise it by being able to pitch your startup to any person, at any time, in any context, and get them excited enough to want to participate in your journey.”

So, Feinzaig says the “aha moment” led to Ready, Set, Raise changing its programming, which will run 8-weeks, to be more focused on a “realistic fundraising process” vetted by hundreds of women.

The coronavirus has impacted the way that accelerators work, Y Combinator and Techstars moved to live, virtual programming, which has the opportunity to be more accessible to parents or people who cannot relocate to Palo Alto for three months out of the year. That said, Y Combinator’s latest batch had a drop in diversity, with only 16% of the companies having a founder who identified as female. In the previous batch, nearly 21% of companies had a founder who identified as female.

The drop in access makes Feinzaig’s work even more difficult, and important. This year, as applications rolled in for Ready, Set, Raise, Feinzaig noticed that more mature companies were applying than usual. The detail led to the founder surveying female founders and discovering that women who had the ambition to start a company before the pandemic, are less likely to do so now. Still, she’s optimistic, saying that they saw the “highest caliber of applicants” to her accelerator than ever before.

Today, Ready Set Raise announced its third cohort, including a startup that digitizes retailers which sell outdoor equipment, a marketplace for ethical and legal data exchange, and a digital platform that connects Black women to culturally-aware providers.

Here’s a look at Ready, Set, Raise’s third cohort of startups:

● Brightly: Founded by Laura Wittig and Liza Moiseeva, Brightly is a startup that combines commerce, content, and community with the goal of scaling conscious consumerism. It is based in Seattle, WA.

● Womp.ai: Founded by Gabriela Trueba, Womp wants to help anyone explore, create, and share 3D. It is based in Brooklyn, NY

● FixFake: Founded by Kathryn Harrison and Jason Law, FixFake offers decision support tools to reduce fraud in e-commerce. It is based in Bozeman, MT

● tbd health: Founded by Stephanie Estey, Daphne Chen, and Sherwin Lu, tbd health is an at-home, STI screening platform

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