Bride faked terminal cancer to con friends into paying for her dream wedding

A bride pretended she had terminal cancer to con her friends into paying more than $15,000 for her dream wedding.

Toni Standen, 29, shaved her head, spoke to the press and said of the disease: “It’s gone to my brain, my bones – it’s everywhere.”

She tugged at heart strings by saying she wanted her dad Derek, who was dying of cancer, to walk her down the aisle.

Friends launched a GoFundMe page to give Standen and partner James “a wedding they deserve,” The Mirror reports.

Standen’s dad Derek, 57, died before the big day but a video he recorded was played.

RELATED: Cancer con Belle Gibson faked terminal illness

One guest told the Mirror: “After hearing her father’s laboured words she got up and gave a faultless speech, even cracking a few jokes.

“Her mother and brother were in bits. We’d all just listened to a father of the bride message from beyond the grave.

“Toni even received a video message from Everton FC, delivered by one of the top players. She laughed throughout.”

After the wedding in Widnes, Cheshire, Standen and James, 52, went to a nearby hotel. Witnesses claim she rifled through wedding cards, counting the cash inside, before jetting off to Turkey for her honeymoon.

Standen’s lies were later exposed when she claimed to have coronavirus, raising suspicions among pals.

Cheryl Aston, 33, who donated $947, said: “She could have won an Oscar, her acting was that good. She fooled us all. We were all completely sucked in.

“She told me she was dying and I fell for it.”

Mum-of-two Cheryl, who was at the wedding, added: “I remember her telling me that her cancer had come back and that it was terminal.

“She told me it had spread to her bones and her organs. I was devastated – everyone was.

“She said she wanted her dad to walk her down the aisle before either of them died. I wanted to help so badly but I couldn’t afford a lot. I asked her about doing a fundraiser. She said, ‘Yeah, yeah, every little helps’.”

WEB OF LIES

In July 2017, Standen was interviewed in her local paper saying she had cancer.

She gave a second interview last year, telling of the “devastating” news her illness was terminal.

In January this year, Standen went as far to say she had two months to live and her organs had started to fail.

And in February, a post on her Facebook page – which she later blamed on hackers said: “RIP TONI. Our lovely Toni passed away last night, surrounded by friends and family … strong until the end.”

Two friends eventually decided to question her.

One said: “We rang her for a three-way conversation and recorded it. We asked her straight: ‘Have you really got cancer?’

“She started crying and admitted it was all lies. We ended the call and phoned the police straight away.”

Jobless Standen pleaded guilty last week to fraud by false representation between February

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Arizona woman fighting aggressive cancer surprised with dream wedding

For Samantha Preston, it was the wedding she always dreamed of even as she undergoes treatment for osteosarcoma.

PHOENIX — For Samantha Preston, it was the wedding of her dreams.

“It was super important because I don’t know how much longer I have. So, for me to get married to the love of my life, and to have my son there, it was so important,” Preston said.

The ceremony was a complete surprise for Preston. It was organized by Banner Thunderbird Hospital and Smiles for Miles, a non-profit that works with cancer patients. Samantha is fighting osteosarcoma, a bone cancer. Her prognosis hasn’t been good.

“At this point, they’re only giving me like a couple of months,” she said.

It’s a diagnosis that she could only face with her boyfriend, and now husband, by her side.

“He has been my rock through this whole entire treatment. Everything he is been there taking care of me, nonstop.” Samantha gushed over her husband Angel.

She’s faced more than a year of cancer treatments and a grim diagnosis with a positive spirit and advice for dealing with hard times.

“Stay positive. I know it’s a hard time right now and everybody’s going through hard times, no matter if it’s the coronavirus or something else. So, if you can just stay positive and maybe we’ll get through this 2020, and 2021 will be a whole lot better.”

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Jason Momoa’s Gift to a Superfan With Cancer Will Warm Your Heart – E! Online

Aquaman made a little boy’s dreams come true. 

On Thursday, Nov. 19, Jason Momoa—who portrayed the superhero in the 2018 film—shared a touching video on Instagram of his FaceTime conversation with a 7-year-old superfan named Danny, who is battling a rare brain cancer. 

In the clip, the 41-year-old can be seen answering the call from Danny, in which the little boy screamed, “Hi, Aquaman! I’m so excited.” 

A smiling Jason replied, “You are so beautiful. You’re excited? I’m excited. I’ve been hearing about you all over from all of my friends and I wanted to call you and say hi and see how you’re doing.”

After telling his idol that he was doing well, Danny went into detail about his love for dolphins, to which Jason asked, “Have you ever rode a dolphin?”

Unfortunately, Danny not only has never rode one, he’s also never seen one in person. Naturally, the Game of Thrones alum promised to “make that happen.”

“I just wanted to say thank you to the community, friends and family on Instagram for reaching out and showing me this beautiful boy Danny who is going through chemo and has cancer,” Jason wrote in the video’s caption. “I saw his video online that made me want to get in touch and FaceTime him and spend some time talking to him.”

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Jason Momoa’s Gift to a Superfan With Cancer Will Warm Your Heart

Aquaman made a little boy’s dreams come true. 

On Thursday, Nov. 19, Jason Momoa—who portrayed the superhero in the 2018 film—shared a touching video on Instagram of his FaceTime conversation with a 7-year-old superfan named Danny, who is battling a rare brain cancer. 

In the clip, the 41-year-old can be seen answering the call from Danny, in which the little boy screamed, “Hi, Aquaman! I’m so excited.” 

A smiling Jason replied, “You are so beautiful. You’re excited? I’m excited. I’ve been hearing about you all over from all of my friends and I wanted to call you and say hi and see how you’re doing.”

After telling his idol that he was doing well, Danny went into detail about his love for dolphins, to which Jason asked, “Have you ever rode a dolphin?”

Unfortunately, Danny not only has never rode one, he’s also never seen one in person. Naturally, the Game of Thrones alum promised to “make that happen.”

“I just wanted to say thank you to the community, friends and family on Instagram for reaching out and showing me this beautiful boy Danny who is going through chemo and has cancer,” Jason wrote in the video’s caption. “I saw his video online that made me want to get in touch and FaceTime him and spend some time talking to him.”

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Porch pirate steals young cancer patient’s gift in Pierce County

The Pierce County Sheriff’s Department says a Grinch made an early appearance, swiping a package from a home. It was a special gift for a 7-year-old cancer patient.

PIERCE COUNTY, Wash — Bradley Lawson is a second grader who likes remote control cars and trucks.

When his uncle said he’d send him a remote control buggy, Bradley’s mom Darla said her son had no problem choosing.

“He specifically picked the one that was orange because orange represents Leukemia,” she said.

Leukemia is what 7-year-old Bradley has been battling for a year.

However, his special gift only made it as far as his front porch before a thief stepped in and took it. It happened Saturday night in the area of Gem Heights Drive and 172nd in South Hill.

The Pierce County Sheriff’s Department is sharing surveillance video, asking the guy seen grabbing the box “to look in your heart and do the right thing” by returning the package to a deserving child.

Bradley has been undergoing chemotherapy and hospital stays, and likely has two years of treatment to go.

“He takes everything so positively, and he’s just an amazing boy. We’re so proud of him,” his mom said.

Bradley’s entire family, including dad Travis and brother Owen, have been by his side. In the shadow of his cancer fight, the stolen package is a minor setback. His family still hopes the thief will learn a lesson.

“That they realize that this was meant for a little boy, and hopefully, it changes them to make them better. You know, make them a better person,” his mom said. 

The Lawson family says they are not concerned about the toy that was taken. What they really want to highlight is the point that Bradley’s medicine could have been in that box. The message they want to get out is taking a package off of a porch could potentially be detrimental to someone’s health.

According to the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department, an anonymous county resident heard about the theft, and left a brand new remote control truck at the South Hill precinct on Tuesday.

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Superhero Surprise ‘A True Gift’ For Marshfield Boy Fighting Cancer

National Review

Biden’s Foolish Immigration Priorities

Joe Biden shouldn’t want to begin his administration with a renewed migrant crisis at the border, but that’s what his priorities risk creating.After many false starts — including the zero-tolerance policy that drove family separations — the Trump administration got a handle on the border thanks to its “remain in Mexico” policy and “safe third country” agreements with Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.These initiatives closed an enormous loophole in the U.S. asylum system — undeserving asylum-seekers were able to gain access to our country, stay here for years while their claims worked their way through overwhelmed immigration courts, and remain even after their claims were denied because we lack the capacity (or will) to track and deport them. This running, de facto amnesty served as a powerful magnet for migrants from Central America.But the Trump administration managed to get Mexico to agree to the so-called Migration Protection Protocols. This meant that asylum-seekers from countries other than Mexico could be made to remain in Mexico while their claims were adjudicated in the U.S. Also, under the safe-third-country agreements, asylum-seekers could be sent to Guatemala, El Salvador, or Honduras (whichever wasn’t their home country) to apply for asylum there. The theory was that if they were genuinely persecuted in their own country rather than simply seeking to come to the United States, they’d be satisfied to apply for asylum in some other nearby country; as it turned out, not surprisingly, most simply chose to go home when they realized an asylum claim wasn’t a ticket into the United States.On top of all of this, the Trump administration began to tighten up on the lax way that asylum rules have been interpreted. Under the law, someone is supposed to be eligible for asylum only if he is targeted for persecution because of his race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion — a definition that shouldn’t apply to economic migrants or people who fear domestic or gang violence.Biden is pledging to destroy this entire architecture, and his aides have been telling reporters that this is exactly what he will do. The rollback will court another border crisis that even the most migrant-friendly administration will be hard-pressed to manage (many of the photographs of cages at the border that spread on social media to condemn Trump’s policies actually dated from the Obama years). Biden also may bring into the U.S. the tens of thousands of asylum-seekers currently waiting in Mexico, which, barring stringent controls, would likely lead to them staying here forever.The first question confronting Biden will be whether to overturn the so-called Title 42 processing that the Trump administration has been using, citing public-health grounds to quickly return migrants coming over the border from Mexico. With the agreements with Mexico and Central American in suspended animation during the pandemic, Title 42 is necessary stopgap that Biden will come under intense pressure from pro-immigration groups to reverse.Biden’s immigration agenda isn’t, of course, limited to

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Miami Dolphins challenge disease with a $75 million gift to UM’s Sylvester Cancer Center

The Miami Dolphins have faced many challenges over their 54-year-history, not least of which is living up to that perfect 1972 season — a feat no football team has matched.

On Tuesday, the Dolphins tackled another challenge, a “one team, one fight mentality” at its Hard Rock Stadium home in Miami Gardens. It came through its charitable arm, the Dolphins Challenge Cancer initiative. The winner turns out to be the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

A gift of $75 million

The National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, part of UM’s Health System, received from the NFL franchise what its representatives are calling a “transformational gift” of $75 million.

“The Dolphins’ support through the DCC has been instrumental to Sylvester’s ability to build world class research programs that enabled it to achieve National Cancer Institute designation — making it the only cancer center in South Florida with this prestigious designation and one of only 71 designated cancer centers in the nation,” said Dr. Stephen D. Nimer, director of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

This is the second “transformational gift” in almost as many months, following an anonymous donor’s gift of $126 million to Sylvester in September, which was the largest gift given in a single amount in UM’s history, according to the school.

Tuesday’s $75 million Dolphins donation, aimed at “improving the lives of those impacted by cancer in South Florida,” according to the team, initiated in a charitable event in the fight against cancer known as the Dolphins Cycling Challenge that began in 2010 and will continue for an 11th edition in April.

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s resolution, according to the team: “a 100% year-round promise to support life-saving cancer research.”

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s annual cycling event has raised more than $39 million for Sylvester so far. Now, this year-round initiative hopes to boost those figures.

Funds will go toward the support of more than 300 active clinical trials, survivorship programs and advancing the research of innovative cancer treatments like immunotherapy at Sylvester.

‘Coming together for cancer research’

Said Dr. Jacqueline A. Travisano, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the University of Miami: “This announcement is a true testament to the power of our South Florida community coming together to fund cancer research. The fight against cancer is deeply personal to many, including me. It is only through dedicated teamwork, such as the extraordinary partnership between Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Miami Dolphins, that we can succeed in ending cancer.”

Travisano is a chair of the Dolphins Cancer Challenge.

The shift to “challenge cancer’” takes the Dolphins organization beyond a single event to align closer to Sylvester’s mission and the work of its more than 300 doctors and researchers.

“As the Dolphins Challenge Cancer, the organization will now become a collective movement providing hope to families and friends, coworkers and neighbors who have been affected by cancer,” the Dolphins said at the event. “Beyond looking for just a cure, the research that Sylvester generates also

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Miami Dolphins’ $75 million gift to UM Sylvester Cancer Center

The Miami Dolphins have faced many challenges over their 54-year-history, not least of which is living up to that perfect 1972 season — a feat no football team has matched.

On Tuesday, the Dolphins tackled another challenge, a “one team, one fight mentality” at its Hard Rock Stadium home in Miami Gardens. It came through its charitable arm, the Dolphins Challenge Cancer initiative. The winner turns out to be the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

A gift of $75 million

The Miami Dolphins announce commitment of $75M to cancer research at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center..jpg
The Dolphins Challenge Cancer logo released on Nov. 10, 2020 on the day the organization donated $75 million to University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Miami Dolphins

The National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, part of UM’s Health System, received from the NFL franchise what its representatives are calling a “transformational gift” of $75 million.

“The Dolphins’ support through the DCC has been instrumental to Sylvester’s ability to build world class research programs that enabled it to achieve National Cancer Institute designation — making it the only cancer center in South Florida with this prestigious designation and one of only 71 designated cancer centers in the nation,” said Dr. Stephen D. Nimer, director of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

This is the second “transformational gift” in almost as many months, following an anonymous donor’s gift of $126 million to Sylvester in September, which was the largest gift given in a single amount in UM’s history, according to the school.

Tuesday’s $75 million Dolphins donation, aimed at “improving the lives of those impacted by cancer in South Florida,” according to the team, initiated in a charitable event in the fight against cancer known as the Dolphins Cycling Challenge that began in 2010 and will continue for an 11th edition in April.

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s resolution, according to the team: “a 100% year-round promise to support life-saving cancer research.”

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s annual cycling event has raised more than $39 million for Sylvester so far. Now, this year-round initiative hopes to boost those figures.

Funds will go toward the support of more than 300 active clinical trials, survivorship programs and advancing the research of innovative cancer treatments like immunotherapy at Sylvester.

‘Coming together for cancer research’

DOLPHINS_CANCER - Sports 00271 JAI
Tom Garfinkel, vice chairman, president and CEO of the Miami Dolphins, speaks during a presentation at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. The Miami Dolphins announced a $75 million gift to Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Health System, on Nov. 10, 2020. Jose A Iglesias [email protected]

Said Dr. Jacqueline A. Travisano, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the University of Miami: “This announcement is a true testament to the power of our South Florida community coming together to fund cancer research. The fight against cancer is deeply personal to many, including me. It is only through dedicated teamwork, such as the extraordinary partnership between Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Miami Dolphins, that we can succeed in ending cancer.”

Travisano is a chair of the Dolphins

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Clarence cancer survivor giving back to Roswell Park through clothing apparel

25-year-old Mariana ‘Mari’ Militello was diagnosed with an extremely rare cancer back in 2016, but it sparked a passion she wasn’t expecting.

CLARENCE, N.Y. — There’s just something about tie dye that’s always got Mariana “Mari” Militello hard at work.

“What I love the most about it was creating something out of nothing,” she said. 

She only found her love for the craft because she noticed something was off in 2016. 

“I was gaining weight out of nowhere, and I was working with a personal trainer six days a week. I was a great student, and I was not able to retain any of the information I was learning,” Militello said.

Mari eventually got an MRI, discovering a diagnosis so rare that doctors call her one in a million.

“We found out that I had a giant tumor in brain tumor. It’s called langerhans cell histiocytosis, and it’s actually a pediatric cancer so it’s not common for a 21-year-old to have it,” Militello said. 

While all her friends graduated college, Mari was forced to stay home so she could get treatment at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. 

Being stuck on her couch, though, is also where she discovered her greatest passion.

“Wearing the tie dyes made me happy, and that was part of the reason I did it. It was therapeutic, it was fun, it was bright,” Militello said. 

Not long after she went into remission, her tie-dying hobby turned into a new business: Rivive Apparel.

“Most people call me Mari. I took ‘Ri’ instead of ‘Re’ because I wanted to put a part of me into every single one of my creations,” Militello said. 

Now she’s even giving back to those who helped her at Roswell Park with the proceeds from a new line coming later this month. 

“There’s a design in it called the ‘Thriver,’ and I made it in collaboration with six other cancer survivors, using their powerful words to live by,” Militello said. 

Whether you’re battling cancer or not, the clothing is more than just another piece to add to your collection. 

“There is light at the end of the tunnel. Stay strong, be positive, and keep going,” Militello said. 

It’s a reminder there’s just something about tie dye, making even the darkest times just a little bit brighter. 

If you would like to check out Mari’s work at Rivive Apparel, click here. 

You can also reach her on Facebook at @riviveapparel or on Instagram @shop_rivive.

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Mary J. Blige and other women touched by breast cancer talk importance of screening

The nine-time Grammy Award-winning singer said in an interview with “Good Morning America” that highlighting the illness is important to her because of the racial disparity in breast cancer death rates.

Higher death rates from the disease for Black women are due to several factors, according to the American Cancer Society’s biennial update on female breast cancer statistics in the U.S.

Some include “later stage at diagnosis and other unfavorable tumor characteristics, higher prevalence of obesity and comorbidities, as well as less access to timely and high‐quality prevention, early detection, and treatment services.”

Blige partnered with the Black Women’s Health Imperative (BWHI), RAD-AID and Hologic, Inc. for the P.O.W.E.R. of Sure campaign in hopes of giving women necessary information about breast cancer screening and why it’s so important.

Women who have battled the disease or who are currently battling the disease are also sharing more about their cancer journeys in the campaign.

The importance of getting screened: ‘Do it even when you’re scared’

Blige said she feels “a lot of fears and barriers” affect whether or not a woman will prioritize getting screened. After losing an aunt to breast cancer, the singer says she now believes a lack of awareness toward screening played
a role in her loved one’s battle with cancer.

“I believe if she had this information that she would be here today — the importance of a mammogram,” the singer said. “When we were growing up, no one spoke about a mammogram, breast cancer — anything like that.”

The singer recalled having many fears going into her first mammogram after losing her aunt and wondering whether it was going to hurt or if she was going to be diagnosed.

“Once I went into the office and went to the procedure, I realized that it was nothing to it,” she said. “It wasn’t painful, it was just a little discomfort on each breast for a second or two, and then it was over.”

She emphasized how she received early results following her Genius 3D Mammography exam and even called the screening “enlightening.” She also said it made her want to know more about her health.

Kimberly Wortham-Macon, a mother of three, is fighting breast cancer and is featured in the campaign along with Blige. She is also adamant about emphasizing the importance of getting checked.

She said she had been considering putting off her mammogram because of the pandemic but quickly took action and went in for a screening after feeling a lump in her right breast. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in July at the age of 40.

PHOTO: Kimberly Wortham-Macon opened up on her battle with breast cancer for the P.O.W.E.R. of Sure campaign.

Kimberly Wortham-Macon

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