See Tracee Ellis Ross’ Fashion Evolution, From ’90s Model to Red Carpet Queen

She only gets better with time!

Tracee Ellis Ross to Receive the Fashion Icon Award at the 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards

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Tracee Ellis Ross is the official 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards Style Icon, which should come as no surprise to fans who have been following the actress’ career for years. She always knows how to bring the unique looks and exciting style choices to any red carpet.

Not to mention, even when she’s lounging at home, her personal style always finds a way to make her followers green with envy. Who wouldn’t be?! Not only is she an award-winning actress who currently stars on the hit ABC show Black-ish, but she’s the daughter of soul queen Diana Ross and the sister of musician and actor Evan Ross.

Since starting out as a model in the ’90s, Tracee has been nailing the fashion game for decades and luckily we’ve rounded up all her best looks over the years. She didn’t just become a fashionista over night and these are all of the incredible photos to prove it.

Tracee Ellis Ross’ Best Looks

Scroll through all of the TV star’s incredible looks through the years and see how her enviable style has evolved.

Don’t forget to tune into the 2020 E! People’s Choice Awards this Sunday to see Tracee become the official Style Icon of 2020.

(Originally published Nov. 6, 2020 at 5 a.m. PT)



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: 1999 Tracee knew how to have fun while keeping it casual. In this tank top and beige oversized pants look, she proved that you don't have to go glam to make your fashion imprint matter.


© Marcelo Bengoechea/Corbis via Getty Images
1999 Tracee knew how to have fun while keeping it casual. In this tank top and beige oversized pants look, she proved that you don’t have to go glam to make your fashion imprint matter.



Tracee Ellis Ross wearing a costume posing for the camera: In 2000, she proved that you can look like a queen any day of the week. This powerful gold outfit complete with gold pumps was just the beginning of Tracee's fashion icon status.


© SGranitz/WireImage
In 2000, she proved that you can look like a queen any day of the week. This powerful gold outfit complete with gold pumps was just the beginning of Tracee’s fashion icon status.



Tracee Ellis Ross holding a sign posing for the camera: No one made it out of the year 2000 without at least one sequin dress to their name. Tracee was not immune to the sequin trend, and rocked this sleek gown during the TV Guide Awards.


© J. Vespa/WireImage
No one made it out of the year 2000 without at least one sequin dress to their name. Tracee was not immune to the sequin trend, and rocked this sleek gown during the TV Guide Awards.



Tracee Ellis Ross talking on a cell phone: During the first season of her hit TV series Girlfriends , Tracee started to become a major muse for her street-style. In this 2000 picture, she proved that you can mix and match and still come out on top.


© Arnaldo Magnani/Getty Images
During the first season of her hit TV series Girlfriends , Tracee started to become a major muse for her street-style. In this 2000 picture, she proved that you can mix and match and still come out on top.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: She kept it classy with this fun and daring all-black ensemble at the 2001 Soul Train Awards in Los Angeles. A smoky eye, hoop earings and knee-high boots all make for the perfect early '00s fever dream.


© SGranitz/WireImage
She kept it classy with this fun and daring all-black ensemble at the 2001 Soul Train Awards in Los Angeles. A smoky eye, hoop earings and knee-high boots all make for the perfect early ’00s fever dream.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: The dress over jeans ensemble was a look in the early '00s. Tracee is nothing if not always aware of the times and fully embracing the fun and quirky staples that made the year 2002 such a fashion year to remember.


© J. Vespa/WireImage
The dress over jeans ensemble was a look in the early ’00s. Tracee is nothing if not always aware of the times and fully embracing the fun and quirky staples that made the year 2002 such a fashion year to remember.



Tracee Ellis Ross standing posing for the camera: Tracee was caught leaving a private residence in the early '00s and proved that you can look comfy and haute couture all at the same time. Matching your headwrap with your dress? Don't mind if she does!


© J. Vespa/WireImage
Tracee was caught leaving a private residence in the early ’00s and

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Sans gala or red carpet, a stylish fashion show at the Met

NEW YORK (AP) — The annual hoopla around the celebrity-studded Met Gala is so intense, it’s often forgotten who the real star is: the fashion exhibit inside.



This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a view of The Costume Institute’s exhibition "About Time: Fashion and Duration," tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a view of The Costume Institute’s exhibition “About Time: Fashion and Duration,” tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)

This year, it’s the only star. A stylish Costume Institute show at the Metropolitan Museum has opened, six months behind schedule. But what’s six months when you’re covering 150 years of fashion?

And that’s the point, in more ways than one, of “About Time: Fashion & Duration,” which explores the concept of fashion through time. Time is a flexible concept, it argues. It is not linear, at least not where fashion is concerned. Ideas revisit themselves through the decades, even the centuries.



This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a view of The Costume Institute’s exhibition "About Time: Fashion and Duration," tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a view of The Costume Institute’s exhibition “About Time: Fashion and Duration,” tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)

That was the central concept even before the exhibit, traditionally launched by the Met Gala in May, was waylaid by the pandemic — which changed everything, including our concept of time. (How many times have you heard someone ask what day or month it is?)

So the fact that “About Time” was able to open at all is cause for celebration. As the Met’s director, Max Hollein, said in opening remarks: “We could not imagine, when we chose the name for this exhibition more than a year ago, how apt the title would become.”

Of course, everything is different this year. Instead of speaking in person at the annual press preview, Hollein and curator Andrew Bolton spoke virtually, and masked, in taped remarks. And crowd size is being restricted, in accordance with guidelines for museums — likely not a bad thing in terms of the viewing experience.



This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a black dress by Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen, left, and a ball gown by American designer Charles James, part of The Costume Institute’s exhibition "About Time: Fashion and Duration," tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
This image released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York shows a black dress by Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen, left, and a ball gown by American designer Charles James, part of The Costume Institute’s exhibition “About Time: Fashion and Duration,” tracing 150 years of fashion. (Anna-Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art via AP)

Visually, the show is concise — smaller than recent extravaganzas like the opulent “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.” Nearly every garment on display is black, save a couple in white or cream. Rather than a collection of loaned items from across the globe, the exhibit consists almost entirely of items from the Institute’s collection.

Gallery: Can you can spot the secrets hidden in these famous logos? (Lovemoney)

The design of the show, by Es Devlin, is intended to convey the inner and outer workings of a clock. There are two clocks, two galleries, and two timelines. One timeline

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Interface Launches Embodied Beauty, Unveils First Carbon Negative Carpet Tile Styles

ATLANTA, Oct. 20, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Interface, Inc. (Nasdaq: TILE), a worldwide commercial flooring company and global leader in sustainability, today unveils its latest collection, Embodied Beauty™. The collection offers a variety of carpet tile designs inspired by and manufactured to respect nature. Consistent with the company’s Climate Take Back™ mission and commitment to lower the carbon footprints of its products, all seven styles of Embodied Beauty are carbon neutral across their full product life cycle through the Carbon Neutral Floors™ program. In addition, this is the first Interface carpet tile collection to feature the company’s new cradle-to-gate carbon negative carpet tiles, an innovation announced separately today.

Interface, Inc. logo (PRNewsfoto/Interface, Inc.)

Designed by Interface Vice President of Global Product Design Kari Pei, Embodied Beauty reflects Japanese aesthetics of minimalism, restoration, and the organic beauty of the natural world. The collection evokes feelings of connection with others and with nature, embracing the principles of ikigai, a Japanese concept related to “having a purpose.” These influences come together in an array of unique styles that range from narrow monochromatic patterns to large-scale graphic tufted textures.

“As our first collection to include carbon negative products, Embodied Beauty truly encapsulates the idea of working in alignment with nature, which is a concept often emphasized in Japanese culture,” said Pei. “This inspired the aesthetics in the design and yielded a wealth of textural and color options to consider. Looking closely at the styles, you can recognize elements of kintsugi, the art of mending broken objects to create something new and beautiful, as well as sashiko, a decorative form of stitching. The carpet tiles create a refined floor that projects poise and quiet grace suitable for virtually any space.”

Beauty That Restores

With seven carpet tile styles and 12 colorways, Embodied Beauty evokes the delicate beauty of antique textiles, irregular gridded textures, woven graphics, and soft, subtle contours of nature. 

The collection features three cradle-to-gate carbon negative styles: Shishu Stitch™, Tokyo Texture™, and Zen Stitch™. These products combine the company’s new CQuest™BioX backing with specialty yarns and proprietary tufting processes and are designed to store more carbon than any carpet tile before. By storing carbon, these innovative styles keep it from entering the atmosphere where it contributes to global warming, and they help Interface customers lower the carbon footprints of the spaces they create.

Embodied Beauty also includes four additional styles – Geisha Gather™, Sashiko Stitch™, Simple Sash™, and Vintage Kimono™ – featuring calm, muted grays in warm and cool tones alongside natural colors for added nuance and palette sophistication. All of the styles combine and contrast tastefully, installing easily and efficiently side by side to deliver an integrated flooring solution with timeless appeal.

Global Availability

The Embodied Beauty collection is currently available in the Americas and is expected to launch globally in 2021.

To learn more about carbon negative products from Interface and about the company’s efforts to reduce its own carbon footprint and that of the built environment, visit https://www.interface.com/carbonnegative. For more information

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