Power of Women Music: Execs in Catalog, Operations, Management Thrive

The past few months has been such a dynamic time for this industry that it was a challenge to keep up with all the executive moves for women on this year’s report. The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has accelerated change, disrupting business models and personal lives. Still, the women on Variety‘s Power of Women impact list have found ways to innovate, and many are hopeful for the future.

Among the women in music who are not just surviving, but thriving, in 2020 are executives from Interscope Geffen A&R, Capitol Music Group, Caroline, Universal Music Enterprises and Warner Chappell Music Publishing, as well as managers, agents, film music aficionados and tech innovators.

See the full list here.  

The women of Capitol Music Group 

  • Britney Davis, VP of artist relations, marketing & special projects, Capitol Music Group 
  • Cindy James, head of commercial marketing, Caroline Music

Davis arrived at Capitol Music Group shortly after Lil Baby signed there three years ago and worked on his double-platinum album, “My Turn,” as well as his powerful single “The Bigger Picture,” released after the killing of George Floyd, with proceeds partially benefitting Black Lives Matter. “He is a true storyteller,” she says of the artist. “He was speaking purely as a Black man of 25 — it was so emotional and raw and authentic.” As head of commercial marketing, James strives to build connections and create repeat listens. Beyond the reign of Lil Baby, who held the top album spot for five consecutive weeks, she’s pleased with the performances of singer-songwriter Clairo and Texas band Surfaces, two acts she’s been developing over the past year. During the second quarter, with lockdown measures in place, “paid subscription revenues grew significantly faster than they did in the first quarter,” James says of streaming services. “So that’s really encouraging.” 

Jane Gowen
EVP of product development & marketing, Universal Music Enterprises
Universal Music Group 

As U.S. head of A&R and marketing for the catalog division of the world’s largest music company, Gowen works with music’s top acts day in, day out. “In the past year there’s been projects from Bob Marley, Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, John Lennon and Cat Stevens, and U2 and Elton John are coming up,” she says. “I’m very lucky.” In the streaming age, the sky’s the limit for catalog sales: “Now, it’s really about finding the story around a catalog,” says the Los Angeles-based U.K. transplant, who started her career at Virgin Records in London. Listening hasn’t dipped with so many people stuck at home. “In fact, it’s thriving.” 

Laura Karpman
Composer  

Karpman won her first primetime Emmy for music in the documentary series “Why We Hate” in September and found ways to record orchestral film scores remotely during the pandemic, culminating in an operatic sequence for HBO’s “Lovecraft Country.” Next up: Marvel’s animated “What If?” series for Disney Plus. The co-founder of the Alliance for Women Film Composers is also the first female music governor in the Motion Picture Academy. “When you do advocacy

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Execs in Catalog, Operations and Management Thrive

The past few months has been such a dynamic time for this industry that it was a challenge to keep up with all the executive moves for women on this year’s report. The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has accelerated change, disrupting business models and personal lives. Still, the women on Variety‘s Power of Women impact list have found ways to innovate, and many are hopeful for the future.

Among the women in music who are not just surviving, but thriving, in 2020 are executives from Interscope Geffen A&R, Capitol Music Group, Caroline, Universal Music Enterprises and Warner Chappell Music Publishing, as well as managers, agents, film music aficionados and tech innovators.

See the full list here.  

The women of Capitol Music Group 

  • Britney Davis, VP of artist relations, marketing & special projects, Capitol Music Group 
  • Cindy James, head of commercial marketing, Caroline Music

Davis arrived at Capitol Music Group shortly after Lil Baby signed there three years ago and worked on his double-platinum album, “My Turn,” as well as his powerful single “The Bigger Picture,” released after the killing of George Floyd, with proceeds partially benefitting Black Lives Matter. “He is a true storyteller,” she says of the artist. “He was speaking purely as a Black man of 25 — it was so emotional and raw and authentic.” As head of commercial marketing, James strives to build connections and create repeat listens. Beyond the reign of Lil Baby, who held the top album spot for five consecutive weeks, she’s pleased with the performances of singer-songwriter Clairo and Texas band Surfaces, two acts she’s been developing over the past year. During the second quarter, with lockdown measures in place, “paid subscription revenues grew significantly faster than they did in the first quarter,” James says of streaming services. “So that’s really encouraging.” 

Jane Gowen
EVP of product development & marketing, Universal Music Enterprises
Universal Music Group 

As U.S. head of A&R and marketing for the catalog division of the world’s largest music company, Gowen works with music’s top acts day in, day out. “In the past year there’s been projects from Bob Marley, Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, John Lennon and Cat Stevens, and U2 and Elton John are coming up,” she says. “I’m very lucky.” In the streaming age, the sky’s the limit for catalog sales: “Now, it’s really about finding the story around a catalog,” says the Los Angeles-based U.K. transplant, who started her career at Virgin Records in London. Listening hasn’t dipped with so many people stuck at home. “In fact, it’s thriving.” 

Laura Karpman
Composer  

Karpman won her first primetime Emmy for music in the documentary series “Why We Hate” in September and found ways to record orchestral film scores remotely during the pandemic, culminating in an operatic sequence for HBO’s “Lovecraft Country.” Next up: Marvel’s animated “What If?” series for Disney Plus. The co-founder of the Alliance for Women Film Composers is also the first female music governor in the Motion Picture Academy. “When you do advocacy

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What Is a Catalog Model?

For many people who fail to understand, there are different aspects of modeling that prospective models can opt for. You can either opt for becoming a fashion model, which is usually the most viable sort of modeling for men and women. Fashion mockups are those models which get to wear the latest fashion trends that are released by designers and model in them on stage. These models are recruited by agencies fashion houses and generally walk the ramp in different fashion shows and get to adorn a huge number of different dresses. On the other hand, a commercial prototypical is one who models in television commercials.

The job of a commercial model is totally different as compared to a fashion model, because they do not get to wear the latest dresses, and nor must they walk the ramp. What a commercial model must do is act convincing in front of the camera and gain recognition by acting in a better manner while on air on the television. However, the third type of modeling is that of a catalog model. Now, you must have seen a great deal of catalogs and calendars that include pictures of archetypal.

There are a number of different designers who release their own catalogs of all of their designs as the season changes, and for these purposes, a catalog model is used to adorn all of those dresses and model for the designer. These pictures are compiled and a proper catalog is created, and these books are sold to the general public then at various book stores and places.

Being a catalog model means that you are experienced in the modeling profession and are able to pose in a good manner so as to get more recognition from different fashion houses, a catalog model might also get to model for a standard fashion show as well, so It does not make a difference as to whether they wish to appear in catalogs or if they wish to appear on the ramp. If you wish to become a catalog model, the first thing that you must do is get a picture portfolio created and then send it over to several demonstrating agencies for selection purposes.

Once you get selected and your pictures are liked by the judges, there are chances that you will quickly get hired and pose for a catalog or a calendar depending on your choice and talents.

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