Exit through the gift shop as Highgate cemetery woos death tourists

It’s a development that its most famous occupant might have predicted, even if it would have him spinning in his well-visited grave.



a stone building that has a sign on the side of a house: Photograph: Friends of Highgate Cemetery Trust/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Friends of Highgate Cemetery Trust/PA

North London’s Highgate cemetery, final resting place of Karl Marx, is to undergo a makeover to enhance its visitor experience. In addition to a spot of landscaping, it will have an exhibition space, a separate gift shop and possibly a cafe.

Home to the remains of 170,000 people, Highgate, which opened in 1839, is the latest cemetery seeking to capitalise on the public’s growing interest in death. Brompton cemetery in south London has recently been given a makeover which saw buildings restored and a lodge turned into a visitor centre with the help of a £4.5m grant from the National Lottery Community Fund.



a stone building that has a sign on a brick wall: Highgate cemetery attracts thousands of visitors a year.


© Photograph: Friends of Highgate Cemetery Trust/PA
Highgate cemetery attracts thousands of visitors a year.

And Brookwood cemetery in Surrey, which has been operating since 1854 when London’s cemeteries became overcrowded following a cholera epidemic, is now opening a museum of death.

“People used to think that visiting cemeteries was a bit weird, a bit ghoulish, a bit morbid,” said Dr Ian Dungavell, head of the Friends of Highgate Cemetery Trust which maintains the cemetery with no public funding. “Now they are realising that cemeteries are part of our historic cultural environment.”

This would perhaps not be a surprise to Marx, who observed in the Communist Manifesto: “In bourgeois society… the past dominates the present.”

But Dungavell suggested it was actually a vogue for family history, popularised by online genealogy sites, and a more open attitude to discussing death, that had seen death tourism come back into fashion.

“There’s a sort of circularity about these discussions. When Highgate opened, cemetery tourism was a big thing, not just in London. If you went to Paris in the 1830s, one of the top places to go was Père Lachaise – it was a must-see.”

Highgate, which today draws 100,000 paying visitors a year, up from 63,000 seven years ago, opened before London had public parks, offering a day out for city dwellers. At the time, it took out advertisements boasting of its unrivalled views across the capital and the splendour of its Egyptian architecture.

But as cemeteries fell out of fashion with more people opting for cremation, Highgate, once used as a horror location by Hammer films, fell into benign neglect and nature attempted to take back the gravestones.

“There is an aesthetic attraction,” Dungavell acknowledged. “Monuments are tumbling down and ivy is growing over them. It can be quite moving. There is sense that nature has it in for all of us – it’s going to win. That’s quite poignant, and people really appreciate that. But romantic decay is still decay, and as the trees get bigger the potential for damage becomes much greater.”



a statue of a person: The grave of Karl Marx in Highgate cemetery. Photograph: Richard Isaac/Rex


© Provided by The Guardian
The grave of Karl Marx in Highgate cemetery. Photograph: Richard Isaac/Rex

Aware of the sensitivities involved,

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Fashion and celebrity snapper behind Harry and Meghan’s LA cemetery photoshoot

  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were pictured at Los Angeles National cemetery for Remembrance Sunday
  • The Duke left a wreath and message which read: ‘To all of those who have served, and are serving. Thank you’
  • Comes after Harry was reportedly told a personalised wreath could not be laid on his behalf at the Cenotaph
  • Photographs of their visit to the cemetery were captured by celebrity and fashion photographer Lee Morgan
  • He previously worked for Vogue, while Kanye West’s Yeezy brand, Facebook and Adidas are also his clients

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle enlisted a celebrity fashion photographer to capture their Remembrance Sunday photo shoot, it has emerged.  

The couple ‘personally recognised’ fallen Commonwealth soldiers by visiting the Los Angeles National cemetery accompanied by one of their new favourite personal photographers, Lee Morgan. 

The Afro-American and Brazilian photographer, who specialises in ‘fashion and celebrity portraiture’, has worked with a string of exclusive clients since launching his career aged 18, including Vogue, Adidas and Bloomingdales.

LA-based Mr Morgan has also worked with fashion designers Rick Owens, Alexandre Plokhov and rapper Kanye West’s brand Yeezy. 

In previous years, the duke has marked the day with visits to the Cenotaph and Westminster Abbey’s Field of Remembrance. 

This year, he and wife Meghan laid flowers they had picked from their $14 million Santa Barbara mansion at the cemetery’s two Commonwealth gravestones – one for those who had served in the Royal Australian Air Force and one for soldiers from the Royal Canadian Artillery.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex pictured during a private visit to the Los Angeles National Cemetery on Remembrance Sunday
The couple ‘personally recognised’ fallen Commonwealth soldiers by visiting the Los Angeles National cemetery accompanied by one of their new favourite personal photographers, Lee Morgan
Lee Morgan, who specialises in ‘fashion and celebrity portraiture’, has worked with a string of exclusive clients since launching his career aged 18, including Vogue, Adidas and Bloomingdales. LA-based Mr Morgan has also worked with fashion designers Rick Owens, Alexandre Plokhov and rapper Kanye West ‘s brand Yeezy
The artistic shots captured the couple walking down through the cemetery before placing flowers and a wreath
They also placed a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery that features a plaque that’s inscribed ‘In Memory of the Men Who Offered Their Lives in Defence of Their Country’
It comes after Harry was reportedly refused permission for a wreath to be laid at the Cenotaph on his behalf today
LA-based Mr Morgan, who has also worked with rapper Kanye West’s brand Yeezy, took these images of the Duke of Sussex

They also placed a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery that features a plaque inscribed ‘In Memory of the Men Who Offered Their Lives In Defence Of Their Country’.

Harry, who spent 10 years in the armed forces, wore his service meals as he lay a wreath on which he wrote: ‘To all of those who have served, and are serving. Thank you.’ 

The pair wore masks

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Women in military honored in new monument at Arlington National Cemetery

A new monument honoring all military servicewomen has been unveiled at Arlington National Cemetery.



a man riding a horse: This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called "The Pledge." The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.


© Luke Homay/Bahary Studios via AP
This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called “The Pledge.” The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.

The life-size bronze sculpture, titled “The Pledge,” shows a woman in full combat uniform bonding with a service dog.

MORE: Bronze statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg to be unveiled in Brooklyn during Women’s History Month

“‘The Pledge’ captures a brief private moment of mutual respect and love, with duty calling,” the description of the statute on the website of sculptor Susan Bahary reads. “They pledge to support each other, doing the best they can to accomplish their important mission and stay safe.”



a man riding a horse: This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called "The Pledge." The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.


© Luke Homay/Bahary Studios via AP
This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called “The Pledge.” The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.

Gallery: Coronavirus changing the way people worship (USA TODAY)

The monument, commissioned by the U.S. War Dogs Association, was unveiled on Saturday and is available for public viewing starting Sunday in an open house event. It is located at the Women In Military Service For America Memorial at the entrance of the cemetery.

“The Pledge honors the commitment of our brave servicewomen in all the jobs they do,” Bahary wrote.

MORE: Army sentinels stand watch at Tomb of Unknowns during pandemic

Tickets to view the sculpture are free, but space is limited due to COVID-19.

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New monument at Arlington National Cemetery honors women in military

“The Pledge” statue shows a servicewoman bonding with a service dog.

A new monument honoring all military servicewomen has been unveiled at Arlington National Cemetery.

The life-size bronze sculpture, titled “The Pledge,” shows a woman in full combat uniform bonding with a service dog.

“‘The Pledge’ captures a brief private moment of mutual respect and love, with duty calling,” the description of the statute on the website of sculptor Susan Bahary reads. “They pledge to support each other, doing the best they can to accomplish their important mission and stay safe.”

The monument, commissioned by the U.S. War Dogs Association, was unveiled on Saturday and is available for public viewing starting Sunday in an open house event. It is located at the Women In Military Service For America Memorial at the entrance of the cemetery.

“The Pledge honors the commitment of our brave servicewomen in all the jobs they do,” Bahary wrote.

Tickets to view the sculpture are free, but space is limited due to COVID-19.

Source Article

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