Women in Film and TV U.K. Appoints Producer Katie Bailiff as CEO

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Film and TV advocacy body Women in Film and TV (WFTV) U.K. has appointed award-winning producer Katie Bailiff as CEO.

Bailiff’s credits include Channel 4’s BAFTA-winning “Feltham Sings,” BBC Two’s RTS and Grierson-winning “The Secret History of Our Streets” and BBC Three’s “Abused by My Girlfriend.”

For the last two decades, Bailiff has worked at independent producer Century Films, where in her most recent role she was creative director. Working together with managing director and co-owner Brian Hill, she developed a company with a reputation for producing high-quality documentaries and dramas for all the major U.K. channels and platforms.

“I am enormously excited and honored to be taking on the role of CEO at WFTV and continuing to build on the hard work and success of the last 30 years,” said Bailiff (pictured, left). “It is such a privilege to lead an organization which makes a real difference within the industry. I passionately believe in the importance of nurturing, serving and representing all women working in film, television and digital media across the U.K.”

“We are delighted that Katie is joining us, as an award-winning producer and senior figure in the industry, she has tremendous knowledge and insight, which will be invaluable to the future development and success of WFTV,” said WFTV chair Liz Tucker (pictured, right). “Both the WFTV board and I are very much looking forward to working with her and building on the current growth of the organization.”

The last two years have been particularly successful for WFTV, with turnover increasing by 40% and membership up by 30%. During this time, it has launched the Pat Llewellyn Bursary fund, introduced three new mentoring schemes, developed an online event program, developed new diversity initiatives, and launched its #forgottenfreelancers campaign.

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J.Crew promotes the head of Madewell to take over the company, as its CEO exits after just one ‘brutal’ year leading the struggling clothing company



a person walking down a street in front of a building: Andrew Harnik / AP Images


© Andrew Harnik / AP Images
Andrew Harnik / AP Images

  • J. Crew promoted Madewell head Libby Wadle as its new CEO, the company announced Tuesday.
  • Wadle will replace Jan Singer, who took over in January after the struggling private-equity-backed retailer went more than a year without a leader while trying to revive its brand.
  • “The continued executive turnover at J.Crew adds to the turbulence of an already brutal year for the retailer,” Moody’s analyst Raya Sokolyanska told Business Insider.
  • The pandemic has added challenges for J.Crew, which recently emerged from bankruptcy. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

J. Crew Group has named Libby Wadle, the head of Madewell, as its next CEO, the company announced in a press release Tuesday.

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Wadle’s promotion comes less than a year after outgoing CEO Jan Singer took over the struggling retailer and caps off an already tough year for the company, which emerged from bankruptcy in September.

The private-equity-backed J. Crew has seen extensive turnover at the top level, with Wadle becoming its fourth CEO in under four years.

Longtime CEO Mickey Drexler stepped down in 2017 as J.Crew fell out of favor with consumers and was succeeded by Jim Brett, who lasted just 17 months before stepping down in November 2018 amid a clash over the company’s direction, after which the retailer went more than a year without a CEO until Singer’s appointment in January.

“Moving forward as a company under unified leadership, we will harness the power of our collective platforms and talented teams to ensure our brands can continue to inspire and grow,” said Wadle, who has spent the last 16 years in senior leadership roles at various J.Crew brands.

Read more: How to avoid the critical mistakes made by Brooks Brothers and J.Crew — and follow the Louis Vuitton model to stay relevant with customers, generation after generation

Wadle takes over as economic fallout from COVID-19 has ravaged brick-and-mortar retailers, but J.Crew’s sales had been declining even before the pandemic hit. In May, J.Crew became the first major retailer to file for bankruptcy as a result of the pandemic, reaching a deal with its lenders to convert about $1.65 billion of its debt into equity.

“The continued executive turnover at J.Crew adds to the turbulence of an already brutal year for the retailer. The brand’s turnaround, which was in process during 2019, is now more challenging given the ongoing disruption in apparel spending, as the pandemic continues to radically alter US consumers’ shopping habits,” Moody’s vice-president and senior analyst Raya Sokolyanska told Business Insider in a statement.

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J.Crew promotes Madewell head to CEO amid ‘brutal’ year

  • J. Crew promoted Madewell head Libby Wadle as its new CEO, the company announced Tuesday.
  • Wadle will replace Jan Singer, who took over in January after the struggling private-equity-backed retailer went more than a year without a leader while trying to revive its brand.
  • “The continued executive turnover at J.Crew adds to the turbulence of an already brutal year for the retailer,” Moody’s analyst Raya Sokolyanska told Business Insider.
  • The pandemic has added challenges for J.Crew, which recently emerged from bankruptcy. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

J. Crew Group has named Libby Wadle, the head of Madewell, as its next CEO, the company announced in a press release Tuesday.

Wadle’s promotion comes less than a year after outgoing CEO Jan Singer took over the struggling retailer and caps off an already tough year for the company, which emerged from bankruptcy in September.

The private-equity-backed J. Crew has seen extensive turnover at the top level, with Wadle becoming its fourth CEO in under four years.

Longtime CEO Mickey Drexler stepped down in 2017 as J.Crew fell out of favor with consumers and was succeeded by Jim Brett, who lasted just 17 months before stepping down in November 2018 amid a clash over the company’s direction, after which the retailer went more than a year without a CEO until Singer’s appointment in January.

“Moving forward as a company under unified leadership, we will harness the power of our collective platforms and talented teams to ensure our brands can continue to inspire and grow,” said Wadle, who has spent the last 16 years in senior leadership roles at various J.Crew brands.

Read more: How to avoid the critical mistakes made by Brooks Brothers and J.Crew — and follow the Louis Vuitton model to stay relevant with customers, generation after generation

Wadle takes over as economic fallout from COVID-19 has ravaged brick-and-mortar retailers, but J.Crew’s sales had been declining even before the pandemic hit. In May, J.Crew became the first major retailer to file for bankruptcy as a result of the pandemic, reaching a deal with its lenders to convert about $1.65 billion of its debt into equity.

“The continued executive turnover at J.Crew adds to the turbulence of an already brutal year for the retailer. The brand’s turnaround, which was in process during 2019, is now more challenging given the ongoing disruption in apparel spending, as the pandemic continues to radically alter US consumers’ shopping habits,” Moody’s vice-president and senior analyst Raya Sokolyanska told Business Insider in a statement.

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Macy’s may temporarily close more stores as Covid cases rise, CEO says

People sit as Macys shopping bags are placed on a table at Herald Square as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 20, 2020 in New York City. The fourth phase allows outdoor arts and entertainment, sporting events without fans and media production.

Alexi Rosenfeld | Getty Images

Macy’s could face more temporary store closures as coronavirus cases rise rapidly across the U.S., impeding its recovery and the all-important holiday shopping season, executives said Thursday.

“Covid is surging again across the country,” CEO Jeff Gennette said during a post-earnings call with analysts. “And that continues to impede our recovery, in international tourism and urban areas. And the supply chains have opened up, yet problems remain.”

The retailer’s online business, which grew 27% during the latest quarter, is expected to rise “at a very aggressive rate” and could expand even faster, depending on whether states and cities shutter stores again, Gennette added.

Macy’s said its flagship stores like its Herald Square location in New York City have been hit hardest during the pandemic. The lack of tourists and office workers shopping over lunch breaks and after work has hurt traffic, he said.

One of the company’s locations in El Paso, Texas, is closed due to a surge in cases there. Mall owner Simon Property Group said earlier this month it had been asked to shut down its Cielo Vista Mall in El Paso. The United States has regularly been logging more than 100,000 new daily Covid infections in the past two weeks.

Gennette said Macy’s is monitoring other communities closely and has a strategy to work through additional store closures. “We are getting expert at this,” he said. “We’re ready to go, no matter what comes our way.”

Gennette said he is optimistic consumers will be eager to get dressed up again, post-pandemic. The retailer’s sales have declined with fewer people visiting its stores for work clothes, prom dresses and wedding gowns in 2020.

“A vaccination is obviously on everybody’s mind, … and I think there is going to be a surge of demand when that happens,” he said.

People who “have been wearing the same clothes, lounging in active and in casual sportswear … they’re going to want to dress up,” Gennette said.

Macy’s shares were flat at midday Thursday.

Earlier in the day, the company reported a third-quarter, same-store sales decline of more than 20%. It said it expects same-store sales of owned and licensed stores to decline by a low- to mid-20s percentage during the fall.

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Macy’s may face more temporary store closures as Covid cases climb and threaten crucial holiday shopping season, CEO says

  • “Covid is surging again across the country,” CEO Jeff Gennette said. “And that continues to impede our recovery.”
  • The United States has regularly been logging more than 100,000 daily Covid infections in the past two weeks.
  • Macy’s said it has plans in place if it must close additional stores, but is hopeful that won’t be the case. It currently has a location closed in El Paso, Texas, due to rising cases there.



a person wearing a hat: People sit as Macys shopping bags are placed on a table at Herald Square as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 20, 2020 in New York City. The fourth phase allows outdoor arts and entertainment, sporting events without fans and media production.


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People sit as Macys shopping bags are placed on a table at Herald Square as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 20, 2020 in New York City. The fourth phase allows outdoor arts and entertainment, sporting events without fans and media production.

Macy’s could face more temporary store closures as coronavirus cases rise rapidly across the U.S., impeding its recovery and the all-important holiday shopping season, executives said Thursday.

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“Covid is surging again across the country,” CEO Jeff Gennette said Thursday during a post-earnings call with analysts. “And that continues to impede our recovery, in international tourism and urban areas. And the supply chains have opened up, yet problems remain.”

The retailer’s online business, which grew 27% during the latest quarter, is expected to grow “at a very aggressive rate” and could expand even faster depending on whether states and cities shutter retailers again, Gennette added.

Macy’s said its flagship stores like its Herald Square location in New York City have been hit the hardest during the pandemic. The lack of tourists and office workers shopping over lunch breaks and after work has hurt traffic, he said.

One of the company’s locations at a mall in El Paso, Texas, is closed due to a surge in cases there. Mall owner Simon Property Group said earlier this month it had been asked to shut down its Cielo Vista Mall in El Paso. The United States has regularly been logging more than 100,000 daily Covid infections in the past two weeks.

Gennette said Macy’s is monitoring other communities closely, and has a strategy to work through additional store closures. “We are getting expert at this,” he said. “We’re ready to go, no matter what comes our way.”

Meantime, Gennette said he is optimistic consumers will be eager to get dressed up again, post-pandemic. The retailer’s sales have declined with fewer people visiting its stores for work clothes, prom dresses and wedding gowns in 2020.

“A vaccination is obviously on everybody’s mind … and I think there is going to be a surge of demand when that happens,” he said.

There will be people who “have been wearing the same clothes, lounging in active and in casual sportswear. … And they’re going to want to dress up,” Gennette said.

Macy’s shares were falling more than 6% Thursday morning.

The company reported a third-quarter, same-store sales decline of more than 20%. And Macy’s said it expects its same-store sales of owned and licensed stores

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Sally Beauty Holdings, Inc. (SBH) CEO Chris Brickman on Q4 2020 Results – Earnings Call Transcript

Sally Beauty Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:SBH) Q4 2020 Earnings Conference Call November 12, 2020 8:30 AM ET

Company Participants

Jeff Harkins – Vice President, Investor Relations

Chris Brickman – President and Chief Executive Officer

Aaron Alt – President, Sally Beauty Supply and Chief Financial Officer

Conference Call Participants

Steph Wissink – Jefferies

Oliver Chen – Cowen

Rupesh Parikh – Oppenheimer

Mark Altschwager – Baird

Simeon Gutman – Morgan Stanley

Jonathan Keypour – Bank of America

William Reuter – Bank of America

Carla Casella – J.P. Morgan

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by and welcome to the Sally Beauty Holdings Fourth Quarter Conference Call. At this time, all lines are in a listen-only mode. [Operator instructions] And as a reminder, today’s conference call is being recorded. I would now like to turn the conference over to Mr. Jeff Harkins. Please go ahead.

Jeff Harkins

Thank you. Good morning everyone, and welcome to the Sally Beauty Holdings fourth quarter earnings conference call. Before we begin, I would like to remind everyone that we have made a presentation available for today’s call that can be viewed from the link provided on our earnings press release this morning or on our investor site at sallybeautyholdings.com/investorrelations. I would also like to remind you that certain comments, including matters such as forecasted financial information, contracts or business and trend information made during this call may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 as amended and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as amended.

Many of these forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as believe, project, expect, can, may, estimate, should, plan, target, intend, could, will, would, anticipate, potential, confident, optimistic and similar words or phrases. These statements are subject to a number of factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. Those factors are described in Sally Beauty Holdings’ filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its most recent annual report on Form 10-K.

The company does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements. The company has provided a detailed explanation and reconciliations of its adjusting items and non-GAAP financial measures in its earnings press release and on its website.

With me on the call today are Chris Brickman, President and Chief Executive Officer; Aaron Alt, President of Sally Beauty Supply and Chief Financial Officer; and Marlo Cormier, Senior Vice President of Finance and Chief Accounting Officer.

Chris will start by offering some thoughts on our very respectable fourth quarter. He will also touch on our thoughts about the current economic environment and our outlook on fiscal year 2021, and finish with our focus, our key focus and investments in fiscal year 2021 as we move towards the completion of our transformation plan. Aaron will then discuss our fourth quarter and full year financial results, touch on our cash liquidity, and also provide some perspective on fiscal year 2021.

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Fashion And Luxury Communications CEO, Phillip Bodenham, Speaks Out On Fashion’s Trajectory

“We have this time to truly get rid of everything that doesn’t work, and replace it with things that do,” says London and LA-based Fashion marketing and communications maven, Phillip Bodenham on a phone interview. He’s speaking of the state of the fashion industry and, in particular, his corner of the business. “When has the world all at one time been given such time to reflect and figure this out? It’s an opportunity not to be wasted.”

The founder of venerable luxury communications agency, SPRING, has a career that started with him as an industry prodigy running UK comms for Tom Ford’s YSL at the age of 21. These days, he’s practicing what he preaches and using COVID as an opportunity to lead the evolution of Fashion PR and Marketing in the age of Corona. 

“I see clients and hear industry talk about media spend migrating to 70% and above to online because we have to follow the consumer and everyone is glued to their phones. Are they reading a title in print or the equivalent online platform, or are they getting brand information from social media, VIP’s and influencers?” Bodenham wonders aloud. 

“It’s easy to say that a certain magazine’s reader is highly targeted to your customer, but I question how much that really matters because high-spenders are looking at street style and digital shopping and Instagram, just as everyone else. I’ve also heard buyers are no longer reading Vogue reviews to find new brands, they’re looking at what streetstyle girls are wearing. It’s a new world.”

What he speaks of is a very different scenario from where the industry has operated since the days when Pret-a-Porter became widespread in the 1920s and 30s—the last serious disruption in fashion before the more recent shakeup of the digital era.

“In the past the brand showed the collection on a runway, the collection went to the PR team, the clothes were shot by the magazines which customers would read and then went into stores to buy what they saw. It was very linear,” explains Bodenham. 

“That went out the window when digital came along, which has been a good thing because it’s made things more egalitarian and democratic. We now have multiple cards to play across channels and it gives our clients more opportunity to cut through in their own unique way. It just needs careful handling which comes only from experience.”

Now, the industry is facing another disruption due to COVID and Bodenham believes it’s much bigger that anything we’ve seen in recent history, with the potential to change the way the industry operates altogether in what he predicts will be a complete reorganization. 

SHIFTING THE CENTER

“What do the four fashion cities really offer?” he questions.  

By four fashion cities he means New York,

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Fashion CEO Lyla Dumont comes to India to create hand beading for her couture dresses – brand post

Lyla Dumont is a luxury couture brand from St. Barth’s, that has become a must wear among high profile women and has caught the attention of every major fashionista in the world along with several other global brands who have reached out for collaborations.

Their CEO, Lyla Dumont co-founded this company with her mother Lisa Schiller Dumont in 2014. From couture to ready to wear, pieces that Lyla Dumont created in her collections are inspired by St. Barth’s beautiful landscape and world-famous beaches while simultaneously evoking the island’s atmosphere of ageless, easy sophistication. Simply put Lyla Dumont aims to make women of all ages feel powerful, free spirited and beautiful when they wear her pieces.

The reason the most prestigious fashion clients and the world’s most famous celebrities have all taken note of Lyla Dumont is her immense attention to detail and quality. Lyla Dumont’s Couture dresses are all hand embroidered with Japanese cut glass beads, Swarovski rhinestones and a variation of different traditional embroidery techniques, while her ready to wear pieces are only made of natural, sustainable fabrics. True to French couture tradition her dresses are stitched and finished in France with materials sourced from French and European fabric makers.

Many of Lyla’s exclusive clients such as stars like Mariah Carey, Kris Jenner, international super models and even the Middle Easters royalty each have very different tasted and design requirements to which Lyla Dumont custom designs for.

After her extended trip in India, exploring its diverse range of embroidery techniques throughout the villagers of the country this lead Lyla Dumont to also created strong ties with the Bollywood community and has lead to a high demand for her pieces to be featured in several upcoming films and magazine editorials.

Lyla Dumont’s line has been making noise all over the world and amongst the most prestigious circles of the fashion industry and it seems like her love for Indian culture is set to elevate her company to even greater heights.

Disclaimer: This is a company press release. No HT journalist is involved in creation of this content.

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e.l.f. Beauty’s (ELF) CEO Tarang Amin on Q2 2021 Results – Earnings Call Transcript

e.l.f. Beauty’s (NYSE:ELF) Q2 2021 Earnings Conference Call November 4, 2020 4:30 PM ET

Company Participants

KC Katten – Vice President, Investor Relations

Tarang Amin – Chairman & Chief Executive Officer

Mandy Fields – Senior Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Conference Call Participants

Erinn Murphy – Piper Sandler

Linda Bolton-Weiser – D.A. Davidson

Dara Mohsenian – Morgan Stanley

Steph Wissink – Jefferies

Andrea Teixeira – JPMorgan

Oliver Chen – Cowen

Bill Chappell – Truist Securities

Jon Andersen – William Blair

Rupesh Parikh – Oppenheimer

KC Katten

Thank you for joining us today to discuss e.l.f. Beauty’s Second Quarter Fiscal 2021 Results. I’m KC Katten, Vice President of Investor Relations. With me today are Tarang Amin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; and Mandy Fields, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. We encourage you to tune into our webcast presentation for the best viewing experience on the content we’re presenting which you can access on our website at investor.elfcosmetics.com.

Please note after the presentation, there’s a separate dial-in for the Q&A session also noted in the press release. Since many of our remarks today contain forward-looking statements, please refer to our earnings release and reports filed with the SEC where you’ll find factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements.

In addition the company’s presentation today includes information presented on a non-GAAP basis. We refer you to today’s press release for a reconciliation of the differences between the non-GAAP presentation and the most directly comparable GAAP measure.

With that, let me turn the webcast over to Tarang.

Tarang Amin

Thank you, KC and good afternoon everyone. I hope that you’re staying safe and well. Today, I will talk about the fundamental drivers behind our second quarter results, our growth opportunities, and the overall strategic framework for our company. I am so proud of our e.l.f. Beauty team for delivering strong results in the second quarter as we continue to navigate major category headwinds as a result of COVID-19. This is our seventh consecutive quarter of net sales growth with Q2 net sales of $72 million, up 7% versus a year ago.

We expanded gross margin to 65%, up approximately 100 basis points versus last year and delivered adjusted EBITDA of $14 million, while increasing our investment in marketing and digital.

We continue to grow share in the quarter with 5.5% of the color cosmetics market, up 100 basis points versus a year ago. We also took important next steps in our transformation to a multi-brand portfolio with the unveiling of Keys Soulcare, our groundbreaking new lifestyle Beauty brand with Alicia Keys and the launch of our recharged W3ll PEOPLE plant-powered Clean Beauty brand.

Before Mandy goes into more detail on our results, I want to share the key pillars underpinning our performance and talk about why I’m optimistic about the future of our brand portfolio.

Our strategy is working. We came into this volatile period from a position of strength. Our superpowers that center on

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A Philly sports clothing firm picks its first female CEO and tasks her with ‘making people aware that we exist.’

One of the city’s lesser-known enterprises is a factory at the edge of Feltonville and Juniata Park in North Philadelphia, where the whir and clatter of 350 sewing machines and the snap and billow of fabric have helped dress 500,000 U.S. sports teams in the last three decades.

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“It’s just a very interesting, authentic heritage,” said Cindy DiPietrantonio, who was hired during the coronavirus pandemic to take the wraps off Boathouse Sports and raise its public profile.

Formerly the chief operating officer of Sidney Kimmel’s clothing company, Jones Group — now Nine West Holdings — and then president of the jewelry company Alex and Ani, DiPietrantonio was recently named the company’s second chief executive.

The Mount Laurel resident is also the first female chief executive since Boathouse Sports was founded in 1985 by John Strotbeck, an American rower in the 1984 and 1988 Olympics. The company quickly became known for its hardy outerwear that stood up to rigorous use from competitive crew teams.

Boathouse today is a throwback to the city’s all-but-vanished past as a major clothing center. “We do all the sewing and cutting,” DiPietrantonio said. “It’s handcrafted right here in Philadelphia.”

Over the next three to five years, Strotbeck said, the company has a goal to grow business by 500%, despite fierce competition from such firms as Adidas, Nike, Under Armour, Athleta and Lululemon.

“We really strive to be that elite, functional apparel that really improves the journey of the athlete,” Strotbeck said. Its biggest customers include Ivy League schools, universities in the Big Ten, and prep schools, in addition to some professional sports leagues.

Boathouse, which hires many of its garment makers from Philadelphia and neighboring communities, is among a growing number of companies such as ABLE and Patagonia, which pride themselves on environmental sustainability, equitable wages, domestic production, and transparency in their manufacturing processes.

“It’s throwing me back all the way back to the ’80s, when [her former employer] Jones domestically made products,” DiPietrantonio said, but Boathouse’s manufacturing in the U.S. has meant that their apparel is more expensive compared with clothes produced overseas.

Boathouse, which relies on the craftsmanship of its products to attract customers, has long been a stranger to promoting itself, she said, even as sales in the multi-billion dollar international sportswear industry have surged for years and are expected to hit $208 billion in 2025, according to the German market and consumer data-collecting firm Statista.

Over time, as sportswear giants continued to provide apparel for college and other elite sports teams, Strotbeck said, Boathouse needed to change course.

The company, which has a 100,000-square-foot factory, had since decided to cater to individual customers who wanted to buy just one — or a few — products instead of buying in bulk for a team.

That goal became more important during the coronavirus pandemic, which prompted droves of sports teams to cancel or downsize games and practices.

“We had planned on really moving the company to a broader audience and branding,” said

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