Women’s college basketball 2020-21 SEC predictions — Can anyone challenge No. 1 South Carolina?

As the countdown continues to the start of the 2020-21 women’s college basketball season on Nov. 25, ESPN.com’s panel of experts is making its predictions for all of the nation’s top conferences. We wrap up our league previews with the SEC, where the No. 1 South Carolina Gamecocks continue to dominate. The Mississippi State Bulldogs and Kentucky Wildcats have new head coaches, and all eyes are on Kellie Harper in her second season with the Tennessee Lady Vols.

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SEC 2020-21 superlatives

Player of the Year

Mechelle Voepel: Rhyne Howard, Kentucky
Graham Hays: Rhyne Howard, Kentucky
Charlie Creme: Rhyne Howard, Kentucky

Newcomer of the Year

Voepel: Destiny Pitts, Texas A&M
Hays: Destiny Slocum, Arkansas
Creme: Destiny Pitts, Texas A&M


SEC 2020-21 writer roundtable

What does Matthew Mitchell’s abrupt retirement mean for national player of the year front-runner Rhyne Howard and Kentucky?

Voepel: First off, you feel for Matthew Mitchell and his family, and hope for the best for them. In an interview published by the Lexington Herald-Leader on Oct. 28, Mitchell said his recovery — he had brain surgery in the summer after a fall in March — had gone slower than he expected, but he was “rounding the corner” and anticipated being back to his full duties by the time the season started. Then, shockingly, he resigned on Nov. 12. Howard and the rest of the Wildcats are obviously sad and concerned for Mitchell. But by the same token, interim coach Kyra Elzy had essentially had been acting in a head coaching capacity while Mitchell was recuperating. So the players already have had time with her in that role.

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Elzy said philosophically she is a lot like Mitchell, especially with her emphasis on defense, and she has a great relationship with Howard. So this change — while difficult emotionally for all involved — is probably going to be relatively smooth. It’s also notable that now the 14-team SEC has seven Black women as head coaches with Elzy’s elevation, and four SEC head coaches are former Tennessee Lady Vol players.

Hays: I agree that, first and foremost, what this means for Mitchell is the most important part of the story. In a Zoom call a week or two before he retired, even while sounding a note of optimism, he didn’t hide the difficulty of his recovery. Hopefully he now has an opportunity to continue and complete that recovery at his own pace and figure out what comes next in his life.

On the basketball side, Mitchell’s retirement was abrupt ,but Kentucky had been adjusting to his absence for months because of the difficulty of that retirement. Elzy and the rest of what is now her staff were largely running things on a day-to-day basis throughout most of the summer. So not only do the players know her well, they know what it feels like when she’s the one who has the final word. In that sense, as sudden as

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Women challenge banishment from Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in U.S. appeals court

Denver • A lawyer for four women who were temporarily banned from the Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in Utah asked a federal appeals court on Tuesday to revive a lawsuit challenging their punishment.

In 2018, the tribe banned Angelita Chegup, Tara Amboh, Mary Carol Jenkins and Lynda Kozlowicz from its reservation about 150 miles east of Salt Lake City for five years over allegations they tried to destabilize the tribal government and had filed frivolous lawsuits for nearly 30 years, among other things.

The women’s lawyer, Ryan Dreveskracht, told a three-judge panel for the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver during a virtual hearing that courts have previously found that Native Americans have the right to challenge a banishment. He said the punishment puts 15% of the state off limits to his clients.

“This is the only land they have ever known,” he said.

The tribe’s lawyer, Preston Stieff, argued that federal courts have not found that a temporary banishment is the equivalent of being in custody, the legal standard for them to intervene in tribal discipline under the Indian Civil Rights Act. The 1968 law prevents sovereign tribal governments from infringing on the rights of members and non-members.

Tribes historically did not build jails to incarcerate people and banishment developed as a way to deal with people both accused of committing crimes and also civil offenses, said Grant Christensen, a professor at the University of North Dakota’s law school who focuses on Native American law.

The Ute Indian Tribe says the women, described in their lawsuit as older, tried to disrupt federal litigation between it and Utah to stop the reservation from being reduced in size. The existing reservation boundaries were eventually upheld, the tribe said.

A federal district judge in Utah threw out the women’s claim, citing a 2017 decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in another temporary banishment case. It involved members of the United Auburn Indian Community in California who were banished for 10 years after they publicly accused the tribal council of financial mismanagement and claimed that tribal elections were rigged.

The court ruled that they did not have a right to challenge the banishment in federal court because of tribes’ sovereign immunity to determine the makeup of their communities.

However, in 1996 the 2nd Circuit appeals court found that a federal court could become involved in a case of permanent banishment imposed by the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians in New York.

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Women challenge tribal banishment in US appeals court

DENVER (AP) — A lawyer for four women who were temporarily banned from the Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in Utah asked a federal appeals court on Tuesday to revive a lawsuit challenging their punishment.

In 2018, the tribe banned Angelita Chegup, Tara Amboh, Mary Carol Jenkins and Lynda Kozlowicz from its reservation about 150 miles (241 kilometers) east of Salt Lake City for five years over allegations they tried to destabilize the tribal government and had filed frivolous lawsuits for nearly 30 years, among other things.

The women’s lawyer, Ryan Dreveskracht, told a three-judge panel for the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver during a virtual hearing that courts have previously found that Native Americans have the right to challenge a banishment. He said the punishment puts 15% of the state off limits to his clients.

“This is the only land they have ever known,” he said.

The tribe’s lawyer, Preston Stieff, argued that federal courts have not found that a temporary banishment is the equivalent of being in custody, the legal standard for them to intervene in tribal discipline under the Indian Civil Rights Act. The 1968 law prevents sovereign tribal governments from infringing on the rights of members and non-members.

Tribes historically did not build jails to incarcerate people and banishment developed as a way to deal with people both accused of committing crimes and also civil offenses, said Grant Christensen, a professor at the University of North Dakota’s law school who focuses on Native American law.

The Ute Indian Tribe says the women, described in their lawsuit as older, tried to disrupt federal litigation between it and Utah to stop the reservation from being reduced in size. The existing reservation boundaries were eventually upheld, the tribe said.

A federal district judge in Utah threw out the women’s claim, citing a 2017 decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in another temporary banishment case. It involved members of the United Auburn Indian Community in California who were banished for 10 years after they publicly accused the tribal council of financial mismanagement and claimed that tribal elections were rigged.

The court ruled that they did not have a right to challenge the banishment in federal court because of tribes’ sovereign immunity to determine the makeup of their communities.

However, in 1996 the 2nd Circuit appeals court found that a federal court could become involved in a case of permanent banishment imposed by the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians in New York.

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Women challenge tribal banishment in US appeals court | National politics



Women challenge tribal banishment in US appeals court

This undated photo provided by Mountain West News Bureau shows Angelita Chegup, left, and Tara Amboh, who are among four women banished from their reservation for what they say are political reasons. A lawyer for the four women who were temporarily banned from the Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in Utah asked a federal appeals court on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 to revive a lawsuit challenging their punishment.




DENVER (AP) — A lawyer for four women who were temporarily banned from the Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in Utah asked a federal appeals court on Tuesday to revive a lawsuit challenging their punishment.

In 2018, the tribe banned Angelita Chegup, Tara Amboh, Mary Carol Jenkins and Lynda Kozlowicz from its reservation about 150 miles (241 kilometers) east of Salt Lake City for five years over allegations they tried to destabilize the tribal government and had filed frivolous lawsuits for nearly 30 years, among other things.

The women’s lawyer, Ryan Dreveskracht, told a three-judge panel for the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver during a virtual hearing that courts have previously found that Native Americans have the right to challenge a banishment. He said the punishment puts 15% of the state off limits to his clients.

“This is the only land they have ever known,” he said.

The tribe’s lawyer, Preston Stieff, argued that federal courts have not found that a temporary banishment is the equivalent of being in custody, the legal standard for them to intervene in tribal discipline under the Indian Civil Rights Act. The 1968 law prevents sovereign tribal governments from infringing on the rights of members and non-members.

Tribes historically did not build jails to incarcerate people and banishment developed as a way to deal with people both accused of committing crimes and also civil offenses, said Grant Christensen, a professor at the University of North Dakota’s law school who focuses on Native American law.

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Gucci, Gus Van Sant challenge fashion cycle with film collab

MILAN (AP) — Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele has been looking to transcend the runway show, and the coronavirus pandemic has provided an apt moment.

Michele teamed up with American film director Gus Van Sant to create a seven-part miniseries revealing Gucci’s latest collection, titled “Ouverture.” The videos will be trickled out a day at a time starting Monday in the format of a virtual film festival and following the addictive pattern of streaming services.

Film and fashion have a long relationship, and Gucci is not the first fashion house to team up with a filmmaker, even during the pandemic. Ferragamo presented a film by Luca Guadagnino, the Italian director of “Call Me By Your Name” as the backdrop to its live show in September, while another Italian, Matteo Garrone created a film for Dior’s digital couture presentation in Paris in July. Prada commissioned five international video artists for its presentation in July.

What perhaps makes GucciFest unveil unique is its episodic format.


Michele announced in May that he was breaking with the tradition of the four-times-a-year runway show, often punctuated with an additional destination cruise show. Gucci will now roll out largely seasonless collections in November and April. It’s hard to say what he might have done if the pandemic hadn’t in some ways made a virtual presentation a necessity — especially as the virus makes a resurgence.

But Michele’s notion of how to present fashion has been in evolution since he took over the brand six years ago.

“It has been in the air for many years, the need to follow a new narrative and a new communication. I like experiments,’’ Michele said. While the pandemic did not condition the project, “for me it created a speedier reaction.”

A film buff since childhood, Michele said he was discussing another project with Van Sant before the pandemic and proposed the miniseries project just a month ago. Van Sant traveled to Rome, where he filmed part of “My Private Idaho” 30 years ago, to shoot on location.

“It was a spontaneous idea to make something within just a few weeks. I sort of found that exciting and challenging, like something I had done before,’’ the director said, recalling his work on “Gerry,” “Elephant” and “Last Days,” which he said were filmed on tight schedules with loose screenplays.

Michele said the project was more a collaboration than a commission. “I felt neither invaded, nor invasive,’’ the creative director said.

The film series follows days in the life of a woman, played by Italian actress Silvia Calderoni, as she and her Gucci tribe move dreamily through a rarified Roman landscape, from her shabby chic apartment to a theater, café and vintage shop. She is joined by Gucci models with cameos by friends of Michele’s, including Billie Eilish, Florence Welch and Harry Styles, all wearing Gucci looks that will be in stores starting next spring.

“There is a cinematic fusing with commerce,’’ Van Sant said.

The format allows all fashionistas a coveted front-row

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Miami Dolphins challenge disease with a $75 million gift to UM’s Sylvester Cancer Center

The Miami Dolphins have faced many challenges over their 54-year-history, not least of which is living up to that perfect 1972 season — a feat no football team has matched.

On Tuesday, the Dolphins tackled another challenge, a “one team, one fight mentality” at its Hard Rock Stadium home in Miami Gardens. It came through its charitable arm, the Dolphins Challenge Cancer initiative. The winner turns out to be the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

A gift of $75 million

The National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, part of UM’s Health System, received from the NFL franchise what its representatives are calling a “transformational gift” of $75 million.

“The Dolphins’ support through the DCC has been instrumental to Sylvester’s ability to build world class research programs that enabled it to achieve National Cancer Institute designation — making it the only cancer center in South Florida with this prestigious designation and one of only 71 designated cancer centers in the nation,” said Dr. Stephen D. Nimer, director of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

This is the second “transformational gift” in almost as many months, following an anonymous donor’s gift of $126 million to Sylvester in September, which was the largest gift given in a single amount in UM’s history, according to the school.

Tuesday’s $75 million Dolphins donation, aimed at “improving the lives of those impacted by cancer in South Florida,” according to the team, initiated in a charitable event in the fight against cancer known as the Dolphins Cycling Challenge that began in 2010 and will continue for an 11th edition in April.

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s resolution, according to the team: “a 100% year-round promise to support life-saving cancer research.”

The Dolphins Challenge Cancer’s annual cycling event has raised more than $39 million for Sylvester so far. Now, this year-round initiative hopes to boost those figures.

Funds will go toward the support of more than 300 active clinical trials, survivorship programs and advancing the research of innovative cancer treatments like immunotherapy at Sylvester.

‘Coming together for cancer research’

Said Dr. Jacqueline A. Travisano, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the University of Miami: “This announcement is a true testament to the power of our South Florida community coming together to fund cancer research. The fight against cancer is deeply personal to many, including me. It is only through dedicated teamwork, such as the extraordinary partnership between Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Miami Dolphins, that we can succeed in ending cancer.”

Travisano is a chair of the Dolphins Cancer Challenge.

The shift to “challenge cancer’” takes the Dolphins organization beyond a single event to align closer to Sylvester’s mission and the work of its more than 300 doctors and researchers.

“As the Dolphins Challenge Cancer, the organization will now become a collective movement providing hope to families and friends, coworkers and neighbors who have been affected by cancer,” the Dolphins said at the event. “Beyond looking for just a cure, the research that Sylvester generates also

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Women’s T20 Challenge: Trailblazers beat Supernovas to win first title

Trailblazers spinner Sophie Ecclestone appeals
England spinner Sophie Ecclestone took 1-26 in the final, and 5-55 in her three games in the tournament
Women’s T20 Challenge final, Sharjah
Trailblazers 118-8 (20 overs): Mandhana 68, Radha 5-16
Supernovas 102-7 (20 overs): Kaur 30, Khatun 3-18
Trailblazers won by 16 runs
Scorecard

England spinner Sophie Ecclestone and her Trailblazers side beat defending champions Supernovas by 16 runs to win the Women’s T20 Challenge in Sharjah.

Openers Smriti Mandhana and Deandra Dottin shared 71, but the Trailblazers lost 7-17 to finish on 118-8, with spinner Radha Yadav taking 5-16.

The Supernovas managed 102-7 in reply thanks to a disciplined bowling display led by Salma Khatun and Deepti Sharma.

It is the first time the Trailblazers have won the three-team tournament.

Mandhana exploited the six-over powerplay after the Trailblazers were asked to bat, hitting five fours and three beautiful straight sixes.

After the departure of Dottin, who struggled for timing in her 32-ball 20, the Trailblazers lost momentum on a pitch that started to slow.

Spinners Radha, Poonam Yadav and Shashikala Siriwardena took a combined 7-61 from 12 overs to put the Supernovas in the ascendency at the halfway point.

However, they never recovered from losing Sri Lanka captain Chamari Atapattu to slow left-armer Ecclestone in the second over of their chase.

The run-rate crept up and India captain Harmanpreet Kaur, struggling with injury, was unable to guide the Supernovas to victory despite making 30.

The competition, which started in 2018, is the women’s equivalent of the Indian Premier League. The Supernovas had won the two previous editions.

The only other England player involved was Danni Wyatt. Her Velocity team failed to reach the final, with the opener scoring only three runs in two innings.

Follow live text and BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra commentary of Mumbai Indians v Delhi Capitals in the Indian Premier League final on the BBC Sport website and app from 13:30 GMT on Tuesday, 10 November.

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SEEAG Launches $15,000 “Give The Gift of Agriculture Challenge”

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

An anonymous donor has stepped forward and will match all donations up to $15,000 for every dollar donated to Students for Eco-Education and Agriculture (SEEAG). The “Give the Gift of Agriculture – Double Your Impact Challenge” runs through December 31 with a total fundraising goal of $30,000.

SEEAG’s agricultural education programs have reached over 54,000 elementary school students in Southern California through classroom learning and free farm field trips to SEEAG’s Farm Lab in Saticoy. The programs teach schoolchildren about the origins of their food and the importance of local farmland.

Donations will go to support Farm Lab, which has now moved to live online presentations. The Zoom classes are in three, 45-minute modules: an introduction to agriculture, plant and insect science, and water and soil science. The presentations are for third grade classes and are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

“We hope to return to in-class learning and begin offering our farm field trips later this year. Until then, we are very grateful to our donors and their support as SEEAG creates new ways to reach children with our message despite COVID restrictions,” says Mary Maranville, SEEAG founder/CEO. “Understanding the impact of eating healthy is more important than ever as kids spend more time at home and exercise less. It’s all about making healthy choices.” To date, nearly 800 third graders and 26 teachers have signed up to participate in online Farm Lab this school year.

Donors of $100 will receive a jar of Bennett’s Honey. Donations can be made by going to seeag.org/give.

To learn more about SEEAG, go to www.SEEAG.org, Facebook www.facebook.com/SEEAG.org or contact Maranville at [email protected], 805-901-0213.

About SEEAG

Founded in 2008, Students for Eco-Education and Agriculture (SEEAG) is a nonprofit organization that aims to help young students understand the origins of their food by bridging the gap between agriculture and consumption through its agricultural education programming. SEEAG’s “The Farm Lab” program based in Ventura County teaches schoolchildren about the origins of their food and the importance of local farmland by providing schools with classroom agricultural education and free field trips to farms. Through this and other SEEAG programs, over 54,000 elementary school students in Southern California have increased their understanding of the food journey. For more information, visit www.seeag.org or email Mary Maranville at [email protected]

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Trump efforts to challenge election results ‘are a gift to America’s adversaries,’ foreign policy experts say

  • As his reelection chances diminish, President Donald Trump spoke Thursday evening from the White House briefing room, falsely claiming the election was being “stolen” from him.
  • “President Trump’s wild and baseless claims are a gift to America’s adversaries, who will argue the U.S. isn’t a model for others to emulate or a reliable ally,” said Kori Schake, director of foreign and defense policy studies at the conservative American Enterprise Institute.
  • “Our adversaries benefit from a weakening of American democracy, and surely cheer Donald Trump’s effort to undermine its central institution: free and fair elections,” said Stephen Biddle, professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University.



a large building: Storm clouds are seen above the White House as the edges of Hurricane Delta reach Washington, DC on October 10, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Storm clouds are seen above the White House as the edges of Hurricane Delta reach Washington, DC on October 10, 2020.

WASHINGTON — Foreign policy experts say President Donald Trump’s attacks on the vote-counting process in the wake of Election Day give a boost to American adversaries.

On Friday, Democratic nominee Joe Biden inched closer to a White House victory after taking the lead over Trump in the battleground states of Pennsylvania and Georgia.

As his reelection chances diminish, Trump spoke Thursday evening from the White House briefing room, falsely claiming the election was being “stolen” from him. Trump said his campaign was in the midst of pursuing a series of lawsuits across battleground states.

“They’re trying to rig an election, and we can’t let that happen,” added Trump.

“President Trump’s wild and baseless claims are a gift to America’s adversaries, who will argue the U.S. isn’t a model for others to emulate or a reliable ally,” Kori Schake, director of foreign and defense policy studies at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, told CNBC.

“It encourages our adversaries to challenge our security guarantees and makes the domestic politics of our friends fighting by our side more difficult,” added Schake, a career civil servant with a bipartisan background and stints at the departments of Defense and State and the National Security Council at the White House. 

Benjamin Friedman, policy director at Defense Priorities, told CNBC that Trump’s calls via Twitter to “quit counting votes to keep power damage the U.S.’s ability to serve as an exemplar of democracy to others globally.”

“Allies and adversaries paying attention already knew U.S. elections were messy and President Trump was capable of illiberal statements. So beyond giving adversaries something to mock and allies some heartburn, effects should be small,” Friedman added.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks following the ceremonial swearing-in of James Mattis as secretary of defense on January 27, 2017, at the Pentagon in Washington, DC.


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U.S. President Donald Trump speaks following the ceremonial swearing-in of James Mattis as secretary of defense on January 27, 2017, at the Pentagon in Washington, DC.

“Our adversaries benefit from a weakening of American democracy, and surely cheer Donald Trump’s effort to undermine its central institution: free and fair elections,” explained Stephen Biddle, professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University.

Biddle added that rivals such as Russia, China, Iran and North Korea have an interest in “delegitimizing democracy and countering the notion that democracy is a higher

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Women’s T20 Challenge: Sophie Ecclestone stars as Trailblazers thrash Velocity

Sophie Ecclestone
England and Trailblazers spinner Sophie Ecclestone is the world’s number one T20 ranked bowler
Women’s T20 Challenge, Sharjah
Velocity 47 all out (15.1 overs): Verma 13, Ecclestone 4-9, Goswami 2-13
Trailblazers 49-1 (7.5 overs): Dottin 29, Ghosh 13
Trailblazers won by nine wickets
Scorecard

England spinner Sophie Ecclestone bowled a superb spell as Trailblazers thrashed Velocity by nine wickets in the Women’s T20 Challenge in Sharjah.

The top-ranked bowler in T20 took 4-9, including a double-wicket maiden, as Velocity were skittled out for just 47.

West Indies opener Deandra Dottin scored 29 as Trailblazers reached the target with 12.1 overs to spare.

Trailblazers will book their place in Tuesday’s final with a win against Supernovas on Saturday.

A Supernovas victory will leave all three teams on two points, with the finalists determined by run-rate.

Ecclestone shines in Sharjah

Velocity, coming off the back of a five-wicket win over Supernovas on Wednesday, were unable to deal with the length and spin of Ecclestone.

The 21-year-old took two wickets in consecutive balls, trapping Velocity captain Mithali Raj lbw for one, before bowling Veda Krishnamurthy the next ball.

She then took the wicket of Sushma Verma to leave Velocity reeling at 22-5 after six overs and then finished off the innings by dismissing Jahanara Alam.

England and Velocity opener Danni Wyatt was dismissed for just five, having scored a duck in the win over Supernovas.

Listen to commentary of the Women’s T20 Challenge and the conclusion of the Indian Premier League on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra.

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