A man in Trump gear faces simple assault charge after he was seen breathing on women outside a Trump golf club

A man wearing a Trump shirt and an inflatable Trump innertube around his belly who was seen on video deliberately exhaling on two women outside of President Donald Trump’s golf course in Virginia has been charged with simple assault.



a man looking at the camera: Raymond Deskins was charged with misdemeanor simple assault, police said.


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Raymond Deskins was charged with misdemeanor simple assault, police said.

Raymond Deskins, 61, of Sterling, Virginia, was charged with misdemeanor simple assault, the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

One of the women shot cellphone video of Saturday’s incident outside Trump’s club in Sterling and posted it on social media.

Michele Bowman, public information officer for the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, confirmed to CNN that Raymond Deskins, the man charged, is the man seen in the video.

CNN has been unable to reach Deskins despite multiple attempts.

In the 24-second video, Deskins — who was not wearing a mask — can be seen in a verbal confrontation with the women who were there protesting Trump. It is not apparent what happened before the video began.

The women can be heard telling him to get away from them and back up. One of the women yelled at him, “Get away from me! Get away from me!”

The other woman told him, “You don’t get up in somebody’s face,” to which he responded, “I’m not in anybody’s face.”

She replied, “You are in my face — and you don’t have a mask, so you need to back up.”

That’s when the man can be seen exhaling forcefully, apparently in the direction of one of the women. The women gasped in shock as the man turned around with a smirk on his face.

One of the women yelled, “That’s assault!”

The man yelled back, “I breathed on you!” He then exhaled on the woman taking the video.

“Two separate parties reported they were assaulted during a verbal argument outside of Trump National Golf Club,” the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement. “As the incident was not witnessed by law enforcement and the video did not capture the entire interaction, an investigation was conducted on scene and both parties were advised they could go to a Loudoun County Magistrate and seek a citizen obtained warrant.”

LCSO later updated their statement to say, “This afternoon our deputies served a warrant obtained by a citizen through a Loudoun County Magistrate. Raymond Deskins, age 61, of Sterling, VA, was charged with simple assault (misdemeanor) and released on a summons.”

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With Access To Testing, Women Can Take Charge Of Their Own Health And Deliver Testing

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the whole world the critical importance of access to diagnostic testing. Typically, vaccines and medicines get a lot of attention in global health, but tests are largely neglected by global health agencies and governments.

Today, three non-profit global health organizations, Women in Global Health, the Foundation for Innovative Diagnostics (FIND), and Women Political Leaders, jointly released a report Health in their hands: testing and women’s empowerment mean better health for all at the Women Political Leaders Annual Meeting in Reykjavik.

The report documents a neglect of diagnostic testing for women that has devastating health consequences and loss of life for women when curable conditions are not diagnosed, diagnosed too late, misdiagnosed and therefore untreated or wrongly treated. The report also highlights how women, when empowered as individuals, health care providers, and leaders, are formidable forces for change in health.

“Information is power, and testing enables women to know their health status and manage their lives,” said Roopa Dhatt, Director of Women in Global Health. “Women, as the majority of health workers in the diagnostics deliver chain, will deliver testing for all genders if resourced and trained. We will not achieve universal health coverage until we close the testing gap,” she added.

“Women make up the majority of our global health workforce, and also have a key role in informal caregiving within communities. When empowered, they scale up testing for everyone – making this a key priority as we strive to close diagnostic gaps for Covid-19 and other deadly diseases, and advance towards universal health coverage,” said Catharina Boehme, CEO of FIND, Geneva.

Key findings of the report

The report presents several key findings, reproduced below:

  1. The tests women need are often not available in health systems.
  2. Gender inequality creates information, financial and cultural barriers for women to access testing.
  3. Women lack trust in testing services, and may fear procedures, diagnosis, and stigma.
  4. Barriers to testing are compounded for marginalized women, especially in humanitarian contexts.
  5. Female health workers can scale up testing for everyone, if enabled with training, resources, and decent work.
  6. Taking testing to women at home and work and self-testing can expand testing to more women.

I asked experts around the world about their reactions to the report findings.

“Women and girls have specific health needs, and health systems around the world have been failing them,” said Kamini Walia at the Indian Council of Medical Research. She led the development of India’s National

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Police charge man who they say sprayed women with a dizziness-inducing substance in Owings Mills stores

Baltimore County Police have charged a man with assault after they say he sprayed several women with a dizziness-inducing substance in three Owings Mills stores.

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Police say that on Sept. 9, 38-year-old Terrence Leroy Devillasee of Randallstown approached a woman inside of an Owings Mills Giant grocery store, and told her there was a substance on her pant leg. Surveillance footage showed that Devillasee had sprayed the substance on the woman, police say.

When touched, the substance made the woman feel dizzy. Police say that Devillasee initially followed the woman after she exited the store, but left the area after she “made a scene.” The next day, a similar incident was reported at an Owings Mills Wegman’s supermarket.

Since the police department announced its investigation into the incidents on Sept. 24, two other victims have come forward, police said. One of those women was sprayed with the non-toxic substance in the same Owings Mills Giant on June 11, and the other was sprayed in an Owings Mills Walmart.

Devillasee is charged with three counts of second-degree assault. Devillasee did not have an attorney listed in court records.

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©2020 The Baltimore Sun

Visit The Baltimore Sun at www.baltimoresun.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Suburban women lead charge vs. Trump

TROY, Mich. (AP) — She walks with the determination of a person who believes the very fate of democracy might depend on the next door she knocks on, head down, shoulders forward. She wears nothing fussy, the battle fatigues of her troupe: yoga pants and sneakers. She left her Lincoln Aviator idling in the driveway, the driver door open — if this house wasn’t the one to save the nation, she can move quickly to the next.

For most of her life, until 2016, Lori Goldman had been politically apathetic. Had you offered her $1 million, she says, she could not have described the branches of government in any depth. She voted, sometimes.

Now every moment she spends not trying to rid America of President Donald Trump feels like wasted time.

“We take nothing for granted,” she tells her canvassing partner. “They say Joe Biden is ahead. Nope. We work like Biden is behind 20 points in every state.”

Goldman spends every day door knocking for Democrats in Oakland County, Michigan, an affluent Detroit suburb. She feels responsible for the country’s future: Trump won Michigan in 2016 by 10,700 votes and that helped usher him into the White House. Goldman believes people like her — suburban white women — could deliver the country from another four years of chaos.

For many of those women, the past four years have meant frustration, anger and activism — a political awakening that powered women’s marches, the #MeToo movement and the victories of record numbers of female candidates in 2018. That energy has helped create the widest gender gap — the political divide between men and women — in recent history. And it has started to show up in early voting as women are casting their ballots earlier than men. In Michigan, women have cast nearly 56% of the early vote so far, and 68% of those were Democrats, according to the voting data firm L2.

That could mean trouble for Trump, not just in Oakland County but also in suburban battlegrounds outside Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Phoenix.

Trump has tried to appeal to “the suburban housewives of America,” as he called them. Embracing fear and deploying dog whistles, he has argued that Black Lives Matter protesters will bring crime, low-income housing will ruin property values, suburbs will be abolished. Campaigning in Pennsylvania last week, he begged: “Suburban women, will you please like me?”

There’s no sign all this is working. Some recent polls show Biden winning support from about 60% of suburban women. In 2016, Democrat Hillary Clinton won 52%, according to an estimate by the Pew Research Center.

Talk to women across suburban Michigan, and you’ll find ample confirmation: the lifelong Republican who says her party has been commandeered by cowards. The Black executive who fears for the safety of her sons. The Democrat who voted for Trump in 2016 but now describes him as “a terrible person.”

Together, they create a powerful political force.

Goldman started her group, Fems for

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‘Our house is on fire’: Suburban women lead charge vs. Trump

TROY, Mich. — She walks with the determination of a person who believes the very fate of democracy might depend on the next door she knocks on, head down, shoulders forward. She wears nothing fussy, the battle fatigues of her troupe: yoga pants and sneakers. She left her Lincoln Aviator idling in the driveway, the driver door open — if this house wasn’t the one to save the nation, she can move quickly to the next.

For most of her life, until 2016, Lori Goldman had been politically apathetic. Had you offered her $1 million, she says, she could not have described the branches of government in any depth. She voted, sometimes.

Now every moment she spends not trying to rid America of President Donald Trump feels like wasted time.

“We take nothing for granted,” she tells her canvassing partner. “They say Joe Biden is ahead. Nope. We work like Biden is behind 20 points in every state.”

Goldman spends every day door knocking for Democrats in Oakland County, Michigan, an affluent Detroit suburb. She feels responsible for the country’s future: Trump won Michigan in 2016 by 10,700 votes and that helped usher him into the White House. Goldman believes people like her — suburban white women — could deliver the country from another four years of chaos.

For many of those women, the past four years have meant frustration, anger and activism — a political awakening that powered women’s marches, the #MeToo movement and the victories of record numbers of female candidates in 2018. That energy has helped create the widest gender gap — the political divide between men and women — in recent history. And it has started to show up in early voting as women are casting their ballots earlier than men. In Michigan, women have cast nearly 56% of the early vote so far, and 68% of those were Democrats, according to the voting data firm L2.

That could mean trouble for Trump, not just in Oakland County but also in suburban battlegrounds outside Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Phoenix.

Trump has tried to appeal to “the suburban housewives of America,” as he called them. Embracing fear and deploying dog whistles, he has argued that Black Lives Matter protesters will bring crime, low-income housing will ruin property values, suburbs will be abolished. Campaigning in Pennsylvania last week, he begged: “Suburban women, will you please like me?”

There’s no sign all this is working. Some recent polls show Biden winning support from about 60% of suburban women. In 2016, Democrat Hillary Clinton won 52%, according to an estimate by the Pew Research Center.

Talk to women across suburban Michigan, and you’ll find ample confirmation: the lifelong Republican who says her party has been commandeered by cowards. The Black executive who fears for the safety of her sons. The Democrat who voted for Trump in 2016 but now describes him as “a terrible person.”

Together, they create a powerful political force.

Goldman started her group, Fems for Dems, in early

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