DRDO helps Indian fabric replace Chinese, foreign clothing used for making military uniforms

Director of Directorate of Industry Interface and Technology management (DIITM) at DRDO, Dr Mayank Dwivedi said that for Indian army’s summer uniform alone, the approximate requirement of the fabric is 55 lakh metres and if all the requirements of Navy, Air Force and Para Military forces are added then the requirement may go well beyond 1.5 crore metres per annum.
“We’re following our Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s call for Atmanirbhar Bharat or self-reliance in all the products in India and particularly in defence products. If these yarns and fabric are manufactured in India for the purpose of uniform making for the armed forces, then it will be big achievement as it will help us move one step ahead towards Atmanirbhar Bharat,” Dr Mayank Dwivedi told ANI.
The advanced fabrics can be used for future requirement of the parachute and bulletproof jackets as well.
The DIITM Director further said that the scope of technical textiles such as glass fabric, carbon fabric, aramid fabric and advanced ceramic fabrics is enormous in defence application. Some industries in Ahmedabad and Surat are manufacturing advanced fabrics being used in defence applications.
In a recent digital interaction organised by Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) with the industries of Surat on September 17, the challenges faced by the textile industry were projected. During the interaction, Dr Dwivedi had talked about opportunities in the areas of textile in the defence sector. He expressed his views on various possibilities of advance textile material and fabric used in the Indian Armed Forces.
“We are working to make technical textile for rocket motors and composite structure for the missile system. We are using technical textile in bullet-proof jackets as well. Similarly, I shared the idea of making blends like nylon 6,6 yarn, lycra fibre, viscose, polyester to make army uniforms at the CII webinar in the Surat industry recently. For a particular requirement of the Indian armed forces, the uniform can be made in a much better way,” Dr Dwivedi told ANI.
The major application of advanced textile is required in the uniform worn by the Indian Armed Forces as well as all their accessories such as bags, shoes and tents which are used by the Forces
It was emphasised that the use of advanced textiles blends using yarns of polyester/ nylon 6,6 / cotton/polyurethane/rayon will enhance operational capabilities and comfort of Indian Armed Forces.
Pointing towards the initiative and the participation of Indian companies, he said, “In the webinar, more than 200 companies were interested in getting into this business. Bindal Silk Pvt Ltd, Lakshmipati Group among a few others were present and wanted to take up this initiative. This will not only boost the economy of the country but also generate lots of employment and eventually give a boost to the GDP also.” (ANI)

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Indian fabric to replace Chinese clothing for military uniforms

Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is helping Indian textile industries produce yarns to end the reliance on imports of Chinese and other foreign clothing for making military uniforms.

Director of Directorate of Industry Interface and Technology management (DIITM) at DRDO, Dr Mayank Dwivedi said that for Indian army’s summer uniform alone, the approximate requirement of the fabric is 55 lakh metres and if all the requirements of Navy, Air Force and Para Military forces are added then the requirement may go well beyond 1.5 crore metres per annum.

“We’re following our Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s call for Atmanirbhar Bharat or self-reliance in all the products in India and particularly in defence products. If these yarns and fabric are manufactured in India for the purpose of uniform making for the armed forces, then it will be big achievement as it will help us move one step ahead towards Atmanirbhar Bharat,” Dr Mayank Dwivedi told ANI.

The advanced fabrics can be used for future requirement of the parachute and bulletproof jackets as well.

The DIITM Director further said that the scope of technical textiles such as glass fabric, carbon fabric, aramid fabric and advanced ceramic fabrics is enormous in defence application. Some industries in Ahmedabad and Surat are manufacturing advanced fabrics being used in defence applications.

In a recent digital interaction organised by Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) with the industries of Surat on September 17, the challenges faced by the textile industry were projected. During the interaction, Dr Dwivedi had talked about opportunities in the areas of textile in the defence sector. He expressed his views on various possibilities of advance textile material and fabric used in the Indian Armed Forces.

“We are working to make technical textile for rocket motors and composite structure for the missile system. We are using technical textile in bullet-proof jackets as well. Similarly, I shared the idea of making blends like nylon 6,6 yarn, lycra fibre, viscose, polyester to make army uniforms at the CII webinar in the Surat industry recently. For a particular requirement of the Indian armed forces, the uniform can be made in a much better way,” Dr Dwivedi told ANI.

The major application of advanced textile is required in the uniform worn by the Indian Armed Forces as well as all their accessories such as bags, shoes and tents which are used by the Forces

It was emphasised that the use of advanced textiles blends using yarns of polyester/ nylon 6,6 / cotton/polyurethane/rayon will enhance operational capabilities and comfort of Indian Armed Forces.

Pointing towards the initiative and the participation of Indian companies, he said, “In the webinar, more than 200 companies were interested in getting into this business. Bindal Silk Pvt Ltd, Lakshmipati Group among a few others were present and wanted to take up this initiative. This will not only boost the economy of the country but also generate lots of employment and eventually give a boost to the GDP also.”

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Chinese Statue to Goddess of Beauty Sparks Debate

JIANHE, China — Yang Asha smiled serenely down at the craggy emerald landscape, her hand outstretched in welcome. She appeared unmoved by the fierce condemnation her presence has ignited in China — she is, after all, made of gleaming stainless steel and bigger than the Statue of Liberty.

To officials in her corner of China, the statue of Yang Asha, a goddess of beauty, serves as a tribute to the rich culture of the local people and, they hope, a big draw for sightseers and their money. To many others in China, she is another white elephant in a country full of expensive monuments, gaudy tourist traps and wasteful vanity projects that draw money away from real problems.

Those critics point to the statue of Guan Yu, a general from antiquity, in the city of Jingzhou, where he also towers higher than the Statue of Liberty and wields an enormous polearm called the Green Dragon Crescent Blade.

They point to the construction of a full-size, $150 million replica of the Titanic in a reservoir deep in China’s interior, 1,200 miles from the ocean.

These projects have always endured some criticism in China. But these days the harsh words resonate. Xi Jinping, the country’s top leader, has vowed to eradicate extreme poverty, and some of these projects are in the country’s most impoverished places.

China is also still emerging from the economic devastation of the coronavirus pandemic early this year. With many people struggling to get their lives back in order, the projects seem like little more than costly burdens on a country where many local and provincial governments are already deeply in debt.

Singling out the $38 million Jingxingu Hotel and the $224 million Guan Yu project, which also included an elaborate base and surrounding park, the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development ordered on Sept. 29 that communities may not “blindly build large-scale sculptures that are divorced from reality and the masses.”

Beijing has doubled down on further investment spending this year in an initially successful bid to shake off an economic hangover from the outbreak of coronavirus in China last winter.

Yet with each passing year, as projects are built in ever-more-remote places, the economic kick from each project becomes less and less. China is on track this year to add debt equal to four months’ economic output while its economy grows by an amount equal to less than two weeks’ output.

Local government borrowing “is still out of control,” said Gary Liu, an independent economist in Shanghai.

Particularly controversial on Chinese social media are statues built in areas of considerable poverty. Some local officials are following the model of the city of Wuxi, which drew tourists by the busload after it built a 259-foot statue of the Buddha in 1996.

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Chinese retailer faces backlash after calling large clothing sizes ‘rotten’

A major Chinese retailer has been forced to apologise after one of its stores classified small clothing sizes as “beautiful” and large sizes as “rotten”.



a person standing in front of a store holding an umbrella: Photograph: Andy Wong/AP


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Photograph: Andy Wong/AP

The signs inside the RT-Mart superstore depicted a size chart with small to medium sizes described as “slim” and “beautiful”, with larger sizes as “rotten” and “horrible”.

It was spotted by a customer who photographed and shared them to social media, adding the comment: “I was shocked when I saw this size chart at a RT-Mart today. Am I completely rotten?” The post quickly went viral, drawing accusations of fat shaming women and discrimination.



a group of people posing for the camera: Shoppers wear face masks in Beijing. RT-Mart has apologised for the signs on clothing marking large sizes as ‘horrible’.


© Photograph: Andy Wong/AP
Shoppers wear face masks in Beijing. RT-Mart has apologised for the signs on clothing marking large sizes as ‘horrible’.

“It’s not only disrespecting women but also extremely vulgar,” said one.

Jack Ma’s Alibaba Group Holdings, China’s e-commerce giant is a major shareholder in RT-Mart’s parent company.

Related: ‘Jack Ma is tamed’: How Beijing showed tech entrepreneur who is boss

One commenter joked that Ma, who was recently questioned by the Chinese regulators ahead of a planned – but since delayed – float of his company, Ant Group, would now face interrogation by the state-run Women’s Federation.

RT-Mart issued an apology for the “inappropriate” sign, claiming internal inquiries determined it was an isolated incident at one store. It said the signs had been removed and it would not happen again.

“We sincerely apologise to the public and accept the public’s criticism,” the statement from RT-Mart said. “Thank you very much for your understanding and support of RT-Mart!

There was little forgiveness among netizens, with numerous pledges to boycott the store and skepticism that it was one rogue outlet displaying the signage.

“Businesses that can do such things are rotten to their bones,” said one.

“I just want to know, if this happened in Europe or America, would the company be punished financially,” said another.

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Florasis Debuts on MBK Screen in Bangkok, Demonstrating Beauty of Chinese Culture

Chinese make-up and cosmetics products swept through Thailand in recent years, with Florasis outperforming multiple popular Chinese cosmetic brands.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201111005966/en/

(Photo: Business Wire)

A couple of days ago, “Impressive Customized Cosmetics of Miao”, the latest product of Florasis, appeared on the screen of MBK in Bangkok, making China Beauty popular in Thailand. It is the result of the cooperation between Florasis, Li Jiaqi, a well-known Chinese fashion anchor, and Miao silver ornament craftsmen, showing the quality of Chinese cosmetics products and the beauty of Chinese national culture.

Customers who are familiar with cosmetics must have noted that since October, Chinese Miao Ethnic Minority Silver Limited Collection of Florasis has triggered passionate discussion on Instagram, YouTube and other social platforms frequently. The Internet users wondered where they can get one, because Florasis products look like producing for the palace exclusively. They expressed their favor to Florasis generously and openly.

Established in 2017, Florasis is a brand shouldering up the responsibility to promote the oriental beauty. At present, China is at a rapid growing stage. It is expected that the annual sales in 2020 will exceed 500 million US dollars.

It is understood that the inspiration for Chinese Miao Ethnic Minority Silver Limited Collection came from Miao, one of China’s ethnic minorities. Miao is an ethnic group that is good at making exquisite silver ornaments and embroidery, which need to go through many processes and can only be made by hand. However, with the development of modern industry, Miao silver techniques are also facing the difficulty of inheritance. Therefore, Florasis puts Miao silver patterns on cosmetics to let more people know that China has such exquisite ethnic silver ornaments.

Looking at the previous cosmetics products of Florasis, it is easy to find that Florasis has launched a large number of cosmetics products with Chinese features. Florasis has replicated Chinese traditional techniques to show exquisite Chinese aesthetics and superb manufacturing techniques by cosmetics products. The cosmetics products of Florasis are greatly different from popular cosmetics products in Thailand, refreshing the cognition of Thais to Chinese cosmetics products.

This time, Florasis cosmetics has appeared on MBK Screen in Bangkok, representing the beauty of the Chinese national culture. The ethnic beauty is the beauty of the world. Today, with diversified aesthetics, the ethnic beauty is more capable to arouse the emotional resonance of people all over the world, and let people feel the charm and warmth of products.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201111005966/en/

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Phida Zheng
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Chinese “Singles’ Day” shopping fest rakes in over $100 billion

“Singles’ Day” may sound lonely, but those who took part in the world’s largest annual shopping spree found togetherness in spending over $100 billion during the event, according to Alibaba.



a group of people on a stage: Alibaba Host's Gala for Annual Singles' Day Online Shopping Event


© Bloomberg
Alibaba Host’s Gala for Annual Singles’ Day Online Shopping Event

The final sales figure blew away last year’s $38.4 billion over 24 hours, after Alibaba extended its sales period this year for the first time as it sought to help boost sales for merchants affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

The annual Singles Day shopping festival, the world’s largest of its kind, offers shoppers discounts on a variety of products, from fresh produce to luxury items. Merchants ranging from small online stores to international brands such as Apple, Nike and L’Oreal, participate in the festival by slashing prices on their products.



Singer Katy Perry gave a livestream performance on Tuesday for this year's Singles' Day shopping extravaganza in China. / Credit: Alizila/Adweek


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Singer Katy Perry gave a livestream performance on Tuesday for this year’s Singles’ Day shopping extravaganza in China. / Credit: Alizila/Adweek

Also participating in the festival are A-list celebrities, singers and sports stars from around the world who take part in online promotional events and performances on Chinese TV networks throughout the festival. This year’s headliner was Katy Perry, who gave a livestream performance on Tuesday. 

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Past Singles’ Day performers include Taylor Swift, Mariah Carey and Pharrell Williams, along with celebrities Nicole Kidman, Kobe Bryant, David Beckham and Scarlett Johansson.

Barometer for consumption

The annual shopping festival is closely watched as a barometer for consumption in China. What’s morphed into an astounding revenue-generating enterprise started out among Chinese university students holding parties to celebrate being single in 1993, only to be co-opted by Alibaba 16 years later in 2009. 

The China-based retailing giant marked down merchandise in a marketing campaign that had other e-commerce companies soon doing the same. A decade later, the shopping bonanza has become the world’s largest, regularly dwarfing Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales in the U.S., and giving Amazon Prime Day a run for its money.

“We looked at Black Friday in the U.S. and said, ‘Why don’t we have our own Black Friday in China?'” said Alibaba CEO Daniel Zhang in a statement on its website. “November is a good time of year for a sale, but there are no good Chinese festivals in November. So we found a little-known day, on November 11th known as ‘Singles’ Day.'”

Singles’ Day falls on November 11, which when written numerically as 11.11 resembles “bare branches,” a Chinese expression for the single and unattached.

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Chinese consumers spend over $100B during shopping festival

Chinese consumers spent over $100 billion during this year’s Singles’ Day shopping festival, signaling a rebound in consumption as China recovers from the coronavirus pandemic and a battering of the economy.

From Nov. 1 to Nov. 11, shoppers spent 498.2 billion yuan ($75.1 billion) on Taobao and Tmall, the e-commerce platforms operated by Alibaba, China’s largest e-commerce company.

The final sales figure exceeded last year’s $38.4 billion over 24 hours, after Alibaba extended its sales period this year for the first time as it sought to help boost sales for merchants affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

On rival platform JD.com, consumers racked up 271.5 billion yuan ($40.9 billion) in sales over the same period.

The annual Singles’ Day shopping festival, the world’s largest of its kind, offers shoppers generous discounts on a variety of products, from fresh produce to luxury items.

Merchants big and small, from small online stores to international brands like Apple, Nike and L’Oreal, participate in the festival by slashing prices on their products.

The annual shopping festival is closely watched as a barometer for consumption in China. Alibaba, which pioneered the shopping festival, held its first Singles’ Day sale in 2009. Over the past decade, the shopping bonanza has become the world’s largest, regularly dwarfing Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales in the US.

The Singles’ Day festival is named as such because the main shopping day falls on Nov. 11, which when written numerically as 11.11 resembles “bare branches,” a Chinese expression for the single and unattached.

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Chinese shoppers spend over $100 billion in shopping fest

Chinese consumers spent over a hundred billion dollars during this year’s Singles’ Day shopping festival, signaling a rebound in consumption as China recovers from the coronavirus pandemic and a battering of the economy

HONG KONG — Chinese consumers spent over a hundred billion dollars during this year’s Singles’ Day shopping festival, signaling a rebound in consumption as China recovers from the coronavirus pandemic and a battering of the economy.

From Nov. 1 to Nov. 11, shoppers spent 498.2 billion yuan ($75.1 billion) on Taobao and Tmall, the e-commerce platforms operated by Alibaba, China’s largest e-commerce company.

The final sales figure exceeded last year’s $38.4 billion over 24 hours, after Alibaba extended its sales period this year for the first time as it sought to help boost sales for merchants affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

On rival platform JD.com, consumers racked up 271.5 billion yuan ($40.9 billion) in sales over the same period.

The annual Singles’ Day shopping festival, the world’s largest of its kind, offers shoppers generous discounts on a variety of products, from fresh produce to luxury items.

Merchants big and small, from small online stores to international brands like Apple, Nike and L’Oreal, participate in the festival by slashing prices on their products.

The Singles’ Day festival is named as such because the main shopping day falls on Nov. 11, which when written numerically as 11.11 resembles “bare branches”, a Chinese expression for the single and unattached.

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Chinese Shoppers Splurge in World’s Largest Shopping Fest | Business News

By ZEN SOO, AP Technology Writer

HONG KONG (AP) — Chinese consumers are expected to spend tens of billions on everything from fresh food to luxury goods during this year’s Singles’ Day online shopping festival, as the country recovers from the pandemic.

The shopping festival, which is the world’s largest and typically begins in November, is an annual extravaganza where China’s e-commerce companies, including Alibaba, JD.com and Pinduoduo, offer generous discounts on their platforms.

By 12:30 a.m. (1630 GMT, 11:30 a.m. EDT) on Wednesday, consumers had already spent 372.3 billion yuan ($56.3 billion) on Alibaba’s Taobao and Tmall e-commerce platforms since the company kicked off the shopping festival on Nov. 1.

Rival JD.com also reported cumulative sales of 200 billion yuan ($30.2 billion) since Nov. 1, nine minutes after the clock struck midnight on Wednesday.

The shopping festival got its name as the main shopping day falls on Nov. 11 every year. Also known as 11.11 or Double 11, the numbers look like “bare branches”, an expression referring to those who are single and unattached in China. The day thus later became known as Singles’ Day.

This year’s festival will be closely watched as a barometer of consumption in China, which is just beginning to bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic after months of lockdown earlier in the year.

Analysts expect Chinese consumers to spend more on imported products and foreign luxury brands, since many Chinese tourists were unable to travel internationally due to the coronavirus pandemic and tightened travel restrictions.

A survey by consulting firm Oliver Wyman found that 86% of Chinese consumers are willing to spend the same as or more than during last year’s Singles’ Day festival.

“In the last six months or so, wealthy households have actually spent more money,” said Sean Shen, customer and strategy competence leader for EY in Greater China. “We also see that purchases of luxury segment products are increasing because of the international travel restrictions.”

In 2018, Chinese consumers spent about 770 billion yuan ($116.3 billion) on luxury items, accounting for about a third of the global spend, with each luxury-consuming household spending an average of 80,000 yuan annually ($12,089), according to a 2019 McKinsey report on luxury.

Sales of electronic goods and health and wellness products are also expected to rise, as more people work from home and pay more attention to their health amid the pandemic, according to a report by consultancy Bain & Company.

To help merchants cope with the impact from the coronavirus, online platforms have extended the shopping festival period this year in hopes of boosting sales.

Both Alibaba and JD.com, the country’s two biggest e-commerce companies, began offering discounts on Oct. 21, three weeks ahead of Nov. 11. Some brands and merchants that slashed their prices booked hundreds of millions of yuan (tens of millions of dollars) in sales just hours into the shopping festival.

Tang Chenghui, an electrical engineer who lives in Beijing sees Singles’ Day as an opportunity to stock up on snacks

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Chinese shoppers splurge in world’s largest shopping fest

HONG KONG (AP) — Chinese consumers are expected to spend tens of billions on everything from fresh food to luxury goods during this year’s Singles’ Day online shopping festival, as the country recovers from the pandemic.

The shopping festival, which is the world’s largest and typically begins in November, is an annual extravaganza where China’s e-commerce companies, including Alibaba, JD.com and Pinduoduo, offer generous discounts on their platforms.

By 12:30 a.m. (1630 GMT, 11:30 a.m. EDT) on Wednesday, consumers had already spent 372.3 billion yuan ($56.3 billion) on Alibaba’s Taobao and Tmall e-commerce platforms since the company kicked off the shopping festival on Nov. 1.


Rival JD.com also reported cumulative sales of 200 billion yuan ($30.2 billion) since Nov. 1, nine minutes after the clock struck midnight on Wednesday.

The shopping festival got its name as the main shopping day falls on Nov. 11 every year. Also known as 11.11 or Double 11, the numbers look like “bare branches”, an expression referring to those who are single and unattached in China. The day thus later became known as Singles’ Day.

This year’s festival will be closely watched as a barometer of consumption in China, which is just beginning to bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic after months of lockdown earlier in the year.

Analysts expect Chinese consumers to spend more on imported products and foreign luxury brands, since many Chinese tourists were unable to travel internationally due to the coronavirus pandemic and tightened travel restrictions.

A survey by consulting firm Oliver Wyman found that 86% of Chinese consumers are willing to spend the same as or more than during last year’s Singles’ Day festival.

“In the last six months or so, wealthy households have actually spent more money,” said Sean Shen, customer and strategy competence leader for EY in Greater China. “We also see that purchases of luxury segment products are increasing because of the international travel restrictions.”

In 2018, Chinese consumers spent about 770 billion yuan ($116.3 billion) on luxury items, accounting for about a third of the global spend, with each luxury-consuming household spending an average of 80,000 yuan annually ($12,089), according to a 2019 McKinsey report on luxury.

Sales of electronic goods and health and wellness products are also expected to rise, as more people work from home and pay more attention to their health amid the pandemic, according to a report by consultancy Bain & Company.

To help merchants cope with the impact from the coronavirus, online platforms have extended the shopping festival period this year in hopes of boosting sales.

Both Alibaba and JD.com, the country’s two biggest e-commerce companies, began offering discounts on Oct. 21, three weeks ahead of Nov. 11. Some brands and merchants that slashed their prices booked hundreds of millions of yuan (tens of millions of dollars) in sales just hours into the shopping festival.

Tang Chenghui, an electrical engineer who lives in Beijing sees Singles’ Day as an opportunity to stock up on snacks and imported products such as milk

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