Despite Recent Election Gains, Women Remain Underrepresented in Local Politics | Cities

On Election Day, as tens of millions of Americans cast votes for the country’s first-ever female vice president, the nation’s second-largest metro area also made history of its own: With more than 60% of the vote, California state Sen. Holly Mitchell won an open seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, marking the first time the powerful five-person body will become entirely female. The all-women board will also represent a likely first for any major American metro area.

“We’re seeing more women are putting themselves out there, and that’s great,” says Kathy Maness, first vice president of the National League of Cities and a Lexington, South Carolina, council member. “Women tend to lead differently than our male counterparts, and I’m glad to see that women are stepping up.”

Post-Election Unrest in Photos

LANSING, MICHIGAN - NOVEMBER 04: Protester Kristan Small carries a flag from her father's funeral while attending a fair election demonstration on November 04, 2020 in Lansing, Michigan. Small's father Gordon Small died of Covid-19 on May 8 and she came to the rally to demand that all votes be counted in the presidential election before any candidate declares victory. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Yet in American local politics – as in federal politics – women remain badly underrepresented. As of September 2019, according to data from the U.S Conference of Mayors, among American cities with populations of at least 30,000 residents, only 22% had female mayors. Of the country’s 100 largest cities, 27 had female mayors. (The largest cities with female mayors are Chicago, Phoenix and San Francisco.) As of late 2017, roughly 32% of American municipal councillors were women, according to research from The City Mayors Foundation. The vast majority of local councils remained predominantly male.

It’s a political landscape that makes Los Angeles County’s new board particularly momentous. “I think young women will see this board of supervisors,” says Maness, “and I think it will encourage young people to get involved, and look up there and say, ‘Hey, if these women can do it, I know I can do it.'”

Los Angeles County is not, in fact, the only municipal board to be entirely female. Last year Story County, Iowa – population 97,000 – elected its first all-female Board of Supervisors, and this year San Luis Obispo, California, elected its first all-female council.

But among local governing bodies, Los Angeles County is particularly influential. With more than 10 million residents, Los Angeles County, which includes the city of Los Angeles, is the country’s most populous; its Board of Supervisors, long ago dubbed the “five little kings,” controls a $35 billion budget, the country’s second-largest municipal purse, and oversees the nation’s largest jail system. The board remained all male until 1979. Since 2017, four of its five members have been women.

Its new addition is an established Democratic politician and a stalwart of Los Angeles’ Black community. After years of working in politics, she first won a California State Assembly seat a decade ago. She was moved to run for office, she recently told the Los Angeles Times, after witnessing three male lawmakers nonchalantly cut $1 billion from state child care.

She was subsequently elected to the California Senate, representing a district that included much of downtown Los Angeles, and became known as a champion of the city’s poor.

“I would describe her

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Feds seize tens of thousands of dollars in knockoff cellphone accessories at Twin Cities airport

Federal officers seized tens of thousands of dollars in counterfeit cellphone accessories at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport that had been exported from Hong Kong, authorities said Monday.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers uncovered the knockoff Apple and Samsung phone cases and adapters Thursday at a customs facility on airport property.

If these items were authentic, the agency’s announcement read, the manufacturers’ suggested retail price for the shipment would have been $41,500.

“Substandard and illegal products harm the U.S. economy and the health and safety of consumers,” read a statement from Augustine Moore, area port director for Minneapolis. “In particular, the adapters can be exceptionally dangerous.”

Intellectual property rights protection is a priority trade issue for CBP, the agency has said. In fiscal year 2019, CBP and partner agency Homeland Security Investigation seized 27,599 shipments containing intellectual property rights violations.

Paul Walsh

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Feds seize tens of thousands of dollars in knock-off cellphone accessories at Twin Cities airport

Federal officers seized tens of thousands of dollars in counterfeit cellphone accessories at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport that had been exported from Hong Kong, authorities said Monday.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers uncovered the knockoff Apple and Samsung iPhone phone cases, and iPhone adapters on Thursday at a customs facility on airport property before they could reach its intended recipient.

If these items were authentic, the agency’s announcement read, the manufacturers suggest retail price for the entire shipment would have been $41,500.

“Substandard and illegal products harm the U.S. economy and the health and safety of consumers,” read a statement from Augustine Moore, area port director-Minneapolis. “In particular, the adapters can be exceptionally dangerous.”

Intellectual property rights protection is a priority trade issue for CBP, the agency has said. In fiscal year 2019, CBP and its partner agency Homeland Security Investigation (HSI) seized 27,599 shipments containing intellectual property rights violations with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of more than $1.5 billion had the goods been genuine.

Paul Walsh • 612-673-4482

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©2020 the Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

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Here Are 5 Budget-Friendly Indian Cities To Host Your Dreamy Wedding

The novel coronavirus pandemic has altered our lives in unimaginable ways; social distancing has become the — new normal and the — big fat Indian wedding has now embraced smaller, more intimate weddings. It seems small is the new big! Also Read – COVID-19: With Proper Safety Measure, Air Travel Can Be Much Safer Than Eating At A Restaurant, Says Study

Instead of worrying about what it used to be, couples are chasing the silver lining in this new situation. With restrictions on guest lists, many to-be-weds are leveraging this opportunity to make their dream destination wedding come true! Also Read – Goa Travel News: Casinos Are Reopening, Here Are The New Rules

The pandemic has given couples the chance to tie the knot against the backdrop of an exquisite location, either outside the city without worrying about going over the budget. Also Read – Mahakumbh 2021: Hovercrafts to Help Pilgrims Travel Between Haridwar And Rishikesh – All You Need to Know

A destination wedding that doesn’t burn a hole in your pocket is no longer just a fantasy. Experts from Weddingz.in shares the five most budget-friendly cities to host one’s small and dreamy wedding.

Goa 

With its sun-kissed beaches and breathtaking views, Goa makes for the perfect destination for an intimate and fun wedding. Couples can choose to host their wedding ceremony at a stunning beach resort without having to spend exorbitantly. Goa is host to umpteen affordable resorts with private beaches, little old-style Portuguese inns, and budget-friendly homestays. Apart from being easily accessible via road, air and rail, Goa has a host a lot of restaurants that blend local and continental flavours, and this makes it a perfect destination for a small wedding.

Jaipur

Known as India’s Pink City, Jaipur is steeped in royal history and culture. Apart from being a favoured tourist hotspot, it is also a viable destination for weddings. Jaipur is home to an array of new-age boutique guest-houses and homestays that are pocket-friendly and ideal for wedding festivities with a limited guest list. At homestays and inns, couples can choose curated cuisine, customized dining setup and much more. Jaipur is also easily connected to all major Indian cities and towns and hence, makes for a perfect mini wedding destination.

Pune

Nestled in the lap of the Sahyadri Mountains, Pune makes for an ideal location for a small destination wedding. The city has tons of budget-friendly hotels, farms, resorts, and holiday homes. Also, apart from its proximity to all major cities and towns in and around Mumbai, Pune city has the right mix of old-style Maharashtrian culture and new-age city vibes. The cool and dry weather is another upside for those looking to have outdoor weddings.

Mussoorie

This hill station town in the foothills of the Garhwal Himalayan range is nothing short of a paradise for couples looking to get hitched. Mussoorie provides an array of breathtaking locales and vistas that couples can choose from. The hill town is full of homestays, hotels, and little

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Women’s Marches Bring Thousands To Washington, D.C., And Cities Nationwide : NPR

Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

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Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

Carol Guzy for NPR

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Thousands of people gathered Saturday in Washington, D.C., and in hundreds of cities across the country for the fifth Women’s March.

The latest iteration of the protest event — first held the day after President Trump’s 2017 inauguration — comes 17 days before Election Day and as Republican senators move to quickly confirm the president’s third Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

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Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Carol Guzy for NPR

The controversial election-year nomination was a central focus during this year’s events, motivating rallies and marches throughout the day. If confirmed, Barrett would succeed the feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality during her nearly three decades on the court.

Saturday’s tent-pole event in Washington was permitted for 10,000 attendees. Organizers said that in total, more than 400 events were planned throughout the country.

Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

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Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Carol Guzy for NPR

With Election Day just over two weeks away, mobilizing women to vote was a central theme, alongside other women’s rights issues.

In D.C., Sonja Spoo, a reproductive rights activist, said, “Donald Trump is leaving office and there is no choice for him — it is our choice — and we are voting him out come Nov. 3.”

Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

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Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

Carol Guzy for NPR

One of the largest events planned for Saturday happened in the nation’s capital, where nearly four years ago hundreds of thousands gathered a day after Trump was sworn in.

Though smaller than the historic 2017 crowd, women’s rights advocates came in droves.

Participants carried signs blasting President Trump and supporting Democratic opponent Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris.

Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

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Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

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Brianna Sink

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