At least 51 women of color won seats in Congress, a record. How will they govern?

Here’s how we did our research

For our book “Race, Gender, and Political Representation,” we compared bills sponsored by legislators in 15 different state legislatures in two separate years — 1997 and 2005 — to examine how the combination of race and gender shaped which issues legislators chose to champion. We selected state legislatures to maximize variation in race, gender, and party composition. Unfortunately, there were too few Asian and Native American representatives to allow for comparison, so our analysis focused on comparing six groups: White men, White women, Black men, Black women, Latinos, and Latinas.

We coded all the bills introduced in all 15 states in each year by general subject matter for statistical analysis. We also looked in depth at bills introduced by legislators in similar, majority-minority districts in three of the states to better understand how the content of bills serving similar constituencies might differ by the representative’s group.

In keeping with prior research, we found that out of all legislators, women are most likely to sponsor bills addressing “women’s interests,” Black legislators are most likely to sponsor bills addressing “Black interests,” and Latinx legislators are most likely to sponsor bills addressing “Latinx interests.” However, when we look at how race and gender intersect, we see important differences.

Women of color are the most likely to address the needs of multiple marginalized groups with their legislative portfolios, but Latinas and Black women approach such issues somewhat differently. Latinas are more likely to introduce separate pieces of legislation — some bills addressing women’s issues and some addressing racial/ethnic issues — while Black women are more likely to introduce bills targeted at the way different types of disadvantage intersect, especially for low-income communities of color. Regardless of approach, we find that women of color are distinctly attuned to the needs of marginalized communities.

Black women are most attuned to the needs of poor communities

Compared to everyone else in the legislatures, Black women did the lion’s share of the work in proposing legislation that addresses poverty or social welfare. Approximately 31 percent of all Democratic legislators in our sample sponsored at least one poverty or welfare bill. Black women were by far the most active, followed by Black men and Latinas. Only 20 percent of Republicans introduced poverty or welfare bills overall. Though few in number, Republican legislators of color were much more active on these issues, with Latinas the most active.

Black women were also more likely to tailor their legislation to the economic challenges facing particular groups. For example, Black women introduced bills focused on single mothers and caregiving grandparents, as well as bills that sought to extend benefits to people with criminal records or without citizenship status.

All this was true no matter what kinds of districts elected these representatives of color. Black women introduced the most poverty and welfare legislation whether they came from districts that were mostly rich or poor, majority minority or majority White.

Women of color take restorative approaches to criminal justice

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2020 election brings most women of color ever to 2021 Congress

There will be more women of color sworn in to the 117th U.S. Congress than ever before, with at least 51 women of color elected. Ballots are still being tallied in two close races, so the number could climb.

In western Washington state, Democrat Marilyn Strickland was elected the first Black person to represent the state at the federal level and is one of the first Korean Americans ever elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

“I believe that if we had more women in positions of leadership and power, we could actually solve some of our biggest problems,” she said. “The benefit of having more women at the table, and especially women of color, is that policymaking and decision-making are just better.”

Strickland noted that part of her new position would be cultivating a pipeline of women of color for open political seats and having conversations with them about campaign finance reform. Although many women run for office, women of color face some major hurdles, she said, the biggest of which are financing their campaigns and gaining the support of voters.

Democratic women of color made the most gains; however, Republican women won some of the most competitive races. In Orange County, Michelle Steel and Young Kim won back the districts in Orange County that Republicans lost to Democrats in the 2018 midterm elections. Steel and Kim are two of the first three Korean American women elected to the House.

In New Mexico, Republican Yvette Herrell won back the 2nd Congressional District from Democrat U.S. Rep. Xochitl Torres Small. Democrat Deb Haaland, one of the first Native American women elected to Congress, was reelected, as was Democrat Teresa Leger Fernandez, giving New Mexico its first House delegation made up entirely of women of color.

Congresswoman-elect Fernandez said the effects of the pandemic were worse among communities of color, and she hopes to bring her experience to address the issues they are facing.

“I’m hoping 2021 is the beginning of the shift we need in this country where we start focusing on what our communities need so they can thrive,” Fernandez said. “Our goal should be that we have a Congress that reflects the U.S.”

New Mexico and 23 other states have elected 78 women of color to Congress to date. California has sent more women of color to the House and Senate than any other state, a total of 17, to date. Voters in the state have also elected more women to Congress than other states, a total of 43. Vermont is the only state that has never sent a woman to the Senate or the House.

This election set a new record for Missouri, where Democrat Cori Bush became the state’s first Black congresswoman. Bush will represent the state’s 1st Congressional District, which includes Ferguson and St. Louis.

It’s also a historic year for women in general, with at least 141 women winning seats this election, surpassing the previous record of 127 set in 2019, according to the

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Biden’s first staff appointments include five women and four people of color

Joe Biden, the US president-elect, made another sharp break from Donald Trump on Tuesday by naming a White House senior staff that “looks like America”, including several women and people of colour.



Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP

Related: Trump Pennsylvania court hearing due as Biden sharpens criticism of concession refusal – live updates

Trump has been criticised for running the most white and male administration since Ronald Reagan. There are currently four women and 19 men in cabinet or cabinet-level positions. Picks for the federal judiciary are also dominated by white men.



In a statement, Joe Biden said: ‘America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives.’


© Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP
In a statement, Joe Biden said: ‘America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives.’

But Biden and Kamala Harris, who will be the first female and first Black vice-president, have promised to build a team to reflect shifting demographics. Tuesday’s first wave of appointments included five women and four people of colour.

Jen O’Malley Dillon will be White House deputy chief of staff. The 44-year-old, who as campaign manager was the first woman to lead a winning Democratic presidential bid, will work under Ron Klain, anointed chief of staff last week.

Cedric Richmond, a national co-chair of Biden’s campaign and former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, will quit the House of Representatives to join as a senior adviser and director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

Dana Remus, the campaign’s top lawyer, will be senior counsel to the president. Longtime advisers Mike Donilon and Steve Ricchetti will be senior adviser and counsellor to the president respectively.

Julie Chavez Rodriguez, one of Biden’s deputy campaign managers and the granddaughter of the farmworker union leader César Chávez, will be director of the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs. Annie Tomasini, currently Biden’s traveling chief of staff, will be director of Oval Office operations.

In a statement, Biden’s transition team said: “These diverse, experienced, and talented individuals demonstrate President-elect Biden’s commitment to building an administration that looks like America.”

It also quoted Biden as saying: “America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives and a shared commitment to tackling these challenges and emerging on the other side a stronger, more united nation.”

The appointments reward many of the advisers who helped Biden beat Trump in the 3 November election. Biden won the national popular vote by at least 5.6m votes, or 3.6 points, and in the state-by-state electoral college secured 306 votes to 232.

Video: Sen. Loeffler responds to ‘radical’ Warnock’s call for more debates (FOX News)

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The announcement also reflected Biden’s determination to press ahead with a transition despite Trump’s increasingly tenuous effort to reverse the election.

The former vice-president was due to discuss national security threats on Tuesday with his own advisers, rather than government officials, as the Trump administration has blocked him from receiving the classified briefings normally accorded to a president-elect.

Emily Murphy, the general services administrator, has not

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Biden’s first staff appointments include five women and four people of color | US news

Joe Biden, the US president-elect, made another sharp break from Donald Trump on Tuesday by naming a White House senior staff that “looks like America”, including several women and people of colour.

Trump has been criticised for running the most white and male administration since Ronald Reagan. There are currently four women and 19 men in cabinet or cabinet-level positions. Picks for the federal judiciary are also dominated by white men.

But Biden and Kamala Harris, who will be the first female and first Black vice-president, have promised to build a team to reflect shifting demographics. Tuesday’s first wave of appointments included five women and four people of colour.

Jen O’Malley Dillon will be White House deputy chief of staff. The 44-year-old, who as campaign manager was the first woman to lead a winning Democratic presidential bid, will work under Ron Klain, anointed chief of staff last week.

Cedric Richmond, a national co-chair of Biden’s campaign and former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, will quit the House of Representatives to join as a senior adviser and director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

Dana Remus, the campaign’s top lawyer, will be senior counsel to the president. Longtime advisers Mike Donilon and Steve Ricchetti will be senior adviser and counsellor to the president respectively.

Julie Chavez Rodriguez, one of Biden’s deputy campaign managers and the granddaughter of the farmworker union leader César Chávez, will be director of the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs. Annie Tomasini, currently Biden’s traveling chief of staff, will be director of Oval Office operations.

In a statement, Biden’s transition team said: “These diverse, experienced, and talented individuals demonstrate President-elect Biden’s commitment to building an administration that looks like America.”

It also quoted Biden as saying: “America faces great challenges, and they bring diverse perspectives and a shared commitment to tackling these challenges and emerging on the other side a stronger, more united nation.”

The appointments reward many of the advisers who helped Biden beat Trump in the 3 November election. Biden won the national popular vote by at least 5.6m votes, or 3.6 points, and in the state-by-state electoral college secured 306 votes to 232.

The announcement also reflected Biden’s determination to press ahead with a transition despite Trump’s increasingly tenuous effort to reverse the election.

The former vice-president was due to discuss national security threats on Tuesday with his own advisers, rather than government officials, as the Trump administration has blocked him from receiving the classified briefings normally accorded to a president-elect.

Emily Murphy, the general services administrator, has not yet recognised Biden as the “apparent winner”, which is needed to release funding and office space.

Seeking to project calm, Biden told reporters on Monday: “I find this more embarrassing for the country, than debilitating for my ability to get started.”

But he expressed frustration over the impact on his attempt to fight the coronavirus pandemic: “More people may die if we don’t coordinate … If we have to wait to 20

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Women, People Of Color Comprise Around Half Of Biden’s Transition Team

Topline

Nearly half of President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team is made up of people of color while women comprise a slight majority of the team, new data from the campaign shows, indicating a Biden administration may look different than the predominately white and male White House under President Donald Trump.

Key Facts

According to diversity data first obtained by CNN, 46% of the approximately 500 people on Biden’s transition team are people of color, while 41% of the senior staff are people of color.

More than half of Biden’s senior staff (53%) and the team overall (52%) are made up of women.

Biden is expected to announce picks for his cabinet in the coming weeks, and tapped Ron Klain—a white man—as his chief of staff on Wednesday. 

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) is set to become the first female, Black, and South Asian vice president in U.S. history after Biden chose her as his running mate earlier this year. 

Crucial Quote

“Across the board — from our classrooms to our courtrooms to the president’s Cabinet — we have to make sure that our leadership and our institutions actually look like America,” Biden wrote in an op-ed in June. 

Surprising Fact

Trump’s cabinet is more white and male than any cabinet in almost 40 years, according to the New York Times. Around 25% of Trump’s appointments to Senate-confirmed positions are women. In contrast, around 43% of former President Barack Obama’s appointments were women by the beginning of his second term.

What To Watch For 

Trump has yet to concede and the General Services Administration has thus far refused to greenlight the start of the transition process, a crucial first step. 

Tangent 

Less than half of the senior staff on Trump and Biden’s campaign were people of color, according to data obtained by NBC News in June. Around a third (35%) of staff overall and senior advisers (36%) were people of color on Biden’s campaign, while 25% of senior staff on the Trump campaign were people of color. The Trump campaign did not release data on full time staff, according to NBC News. A majority of both campaigns were made up of women. 

Further Reading

People of color make up nearly half of Biden transition team (CNN)

Trump’s Cabinet So Far Is More White and Male Than Any First Cabinet Since Reagan’s (New York Times)

Who Could Make Up Biden’s Cabinet? (Forbes)

Biden Taps Ron Klain For Chief Of Staff As Transition Persists Despite Trump Resistance (Forbes)

Source Article

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Women and people of color make up majority of Biden transition team

  • Women and people of color make up the majority of President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team, according to CNN.
  • About half the transition staff is made up of women, and about 46% is made up of people of color. 
  • A diverse transition staff might signal that Biden, along with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, is looking to prioritize diversity within his incoming administration. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team is primarily made up of women and people of color, CNN reported. 

About half, or 46% of his transition staff, are people of color, according to CNN, which reviewed diversity data from Biden’s transition team. Women make up about 52% of his transition team. 

“For months, the Biden-Harris transition has laid the groundwork for a Biden-Harris administration, and at the core of that work is an unrelenting commitment to diversity,” Ted Kaufman, co-chair of the Biden-Harris transition, said in a statement to CNN.

“As we continue working full-speed ahead to Inauguration, our diverse group of leaders and staff are reflective of America — upholding President-elect Biden and Vice President-elect Harris’ belief that through diverse voices we can develop and implement a policy vision to tackle our nation’s toughest challenges,” Kaufman added.

A diverse transition staff might signal that Biden, along with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, is looking to prioritize diversity within his incoming administration. 

This would stand in stark contrast to the Trump administration, which in 2016 was 71% white men, according to an analysis done by NPR. Trump had the highest percentage of white men employed in his cabinet since the Reagan administration, the analysis shows. Women and people of color made up about 19% each. 

Biden continues to prepare to take office, even as President Donald Trump refuses to concede or acknowledge the election results. 

The former vice president has not yet announced all of his cabinet picks. But he chose longtime advisor Ron Klain to oversee all White House staff. Klain was Biden’s chief of staff when former President Barack Obama was in office.

Janet Yellen is reportedly under consideration for the position of Treasury secretary. If confirmed, Yellen would be the first woman to occupy the role. Biden might also appoint Michelle Flournoy to head the Pentagon, which would mark the first time a woman has held that position.

Biden announced a 13-member coronavirus advisory committee last week, nine of whom are people of color and women.

Biden’s election victory already marked historic appointments when Harris became the first Black, Asian-American woman to be elected to vice president. 

On the campaign trail, Biden had promised a diverse administration if he won the presidential election.

“My administration’s going to look like America, not just my staff,” Biden said in June. “The administration from the vice president straight down through cabinet members to major players within the White House, and the court. It’s going to be a reflection of who we are as a nation.”

Biden’s campaign staff also boasted higher diversity rates, revealing in

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Record Number Of Women Of Color To Head To Congress

While some ballots are still being counted, the next session of Congress is already set to go down in history books as setting more than one new record. In addition to a record number of women, the 117th U.S. Congress will also count more women of color than ever before, according to a report from the Center for American Women And Politics (CAWP) at Rutgers University. At least 50 women of color, 46 Democrats and four Republicans, will serve in 2021. This bests the record of 48 set in 2019. 

The numbers include 17 incumbent women, 14 Democrats and three Republicans, who were not up for reelection in 2020 and does not include Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris, who will ascend to the Vice Presidency or non-voting delegates in the U.S. House. As of now, three women of color, two Democrats and one Republican, remain in races that have not yet been called.

Women of color have also set a record for the U.S. House with 47 women of color, 43 Democrats and four Republicans, having won their elections. This surpasses the previous record of 44 set in 2019. Of the 47, 25 are black women, topping the previous record of 22 set in 2019. Latinas will also see a record level of representation with 13 set to serve in the House, surpassing the previous record of 12 set in 2019. Seven are Asian or Pacific Islander women, two are Native American women and one is a Middle Eastern or North African woman. The CAWP relies on self-identification to determine race and ethnicity, and the counts include two multiracial women, including one woman who identifies as both Black and Asian and another who identifies as both white and Latina. While only counted once in the overall count, the women are counted twice in the racial and ethnic groupings. 

Now, for those keeping an eye on our overall count, that means only three women of color will be heading to the U.S. Senate in 2021—all of which already hold seats there as none were up for reelection this year. As no women of color won election in 2020, the Senate will count Senators Tammy Duckworth, Mazie Hirono, and Catherine Cortez Masto as the only women of color in the 100-seat chamber.  

“Just five women of color have served in the U.S. Senate in all of American history, with four of those five currently in office, one of whom will soon leave the Senate for the vice presidency,” said CAWP Director Debbie Walsh. “We’re heartened by the

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Booming Healthcare Real Estate a Career Opportunity for Women, People of Color

“When you look at base salary, men still make about 10% more than women, but with annual commissions and bonuses, men on average earn $144,000 while women only earn $42,000,” said Gorham.

Healthcare real estate has been growing in recent years, but that growth has not been shared equally, as there remains a dearth of women and people of color in the sector. According to Christine Gorham, president of CREW Network (Commercial Real Estate Women), studies show the disparity in gender commissions and bonuses is a good entry to understanding the upside and lost opportunity for women and minorities.

“It’s a significant number,” says Gorham. “When you look at base salary, men still make about 10% more than women, but with annual commissions and bonuses, men on average earn $144,000 while women only earn $42,000,” a 70% gap, according to the 2020 Benchmark Study Report on Gender and Diversity CREW Network conducts with the MIT Center for Real Estate every five years. The total compensation gap between men and women is 37% for the healthcare real estate sector, compared to 34% in all of commercial real estate.

Reasons for the large commission and bonus gap in healthcare weren’t part of the study, but Gorham suggested the gap may be due to gender bias in hiring and teaming within brokerage firms, and the tendency for men to share the larger deal referrals with their male friends.

Another reason for the gap could also be due to the lack of women in senior positions, where pay is higher and compensation decisions are being made. Women represent approximately 80% of entry-level frontline workers and providers in healthcare, such as nursing positions. However, this representation decreases across the pipeline, with women making up only about 30% of line roles in the healthcare C-suite. In commercial real estate, women occupy just 9% of C-suite roles.

“If women are not in senior positions, it’s harder to effectuate change by bringing females up through the ranks and sponsoring their directions,” she said. “We need to make employers and executives aware of these startling differences—and have them look at the entire compensation package, not just salaries—to get the whole picture and take action to correct the disparities.”

Career Opportunities in Healthcare RE

Gorham, who is the director of development for CADDIS® Healthcare Real Estate, a Dallas-based top ten development, management and investment firm focused solely on healthcare, urges women and minorities to consider specializing in healthcare real estate. While COVID-19 has temporarily slowed healthcare development and has caused hospitals and physician groups to reevaluate their capital plans, acquisitions are strong, redirected capital from other real estate silos is flowing in, technology is improving the outpatient care options and the future of the sector overall is very bright, she said.

While senior-living has taken a bit of a hit as a result of the virus, much of the growth in the sector is still pegged to the 71.6 million baby boomers, who she notes are expected possibly to

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How Georgia’s women of color beat voter suppression and saved democracy

For Democrats, the most heartbreaking moment in an otherwise upbeat 2018 election took place in the state of Georgia, where an often-inspiring bid by lawmaker Stacey Abrams to become the first Black woman governor of a state synonymous with voter suppression, from Reconstruction through its voter purges of the 2010s, fell just short.

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So in 2020, the Black and brown women of the Peach State went to work. That included an Election Day “war room” where they dispatched some of the weapons that put their crusade over the top — thousands of hot pizzas and bottles of ice cold water, and video-gaming trucks, as well as spoken-word artists, stilt walkers, drag queens, anything that would keep Georgians amused and refreshed to stay on line as they waited to vote.

And the entertainment was just part of what will surely be remembered as one of the most successful get-out-the-vote campaigns in American history. “We anticipated the [BS],” Nse Ufot, the Abrams ally who took over her New Georgia Project which has registered tens of thousands of new voters across Georgia since 2014, told me. That means when they learned at 5 a.m. on Election Day that more than 100 polling places had been abruptly moved in the prior 48 hours, Ufot’s team immediately sent an army of volunteers wearing sandwich boards to the old locations, to convey the new information to any confused voters.

And every little bit helped in what was arguably the most stunning upset of 2020′s fraught presidential election, with Joe Biden riding that increased voter turnout to the brink of a narrow victory that would make him the first Democratic White House hopeful to carry the (former?) red state of Georgia since 1992. The efforts of activists such as Abrams, Ufot and dozens like them are also a reason the state’s two Democratic U.S. Senate candidates performed well enough to force a January runoff, which will give the party a chance — albeit an uphill one — to capture control of Congress to enact Biden’s agenda.

But in reality, what happened this fall in the home state of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. , John Lewis and other icons of America’s never-ending battle for civil rights should be seen as less about Biden, and more about the cherished ideal that every vote counts. In 2016, some 22% of eligible Georgians weren’t even registered to vote, but non-stop organizing has reduced that to the once-unthinkably low 2%. The result was that 67% of those voters cast ballots this fall, beating the prior record from 2008 — when Barack Obama electrified Black voters.

In one sense, Georgia was the frothy top of a national wave, in which voter enthusiasm swamped the seawall of Republican-enacted repressive laws and practices meant to keep unfettered democracy at bay. More than 150 million Americans voted in 2020 — millions of ballots are still being counted, in fact — which is an all-time record.

And yet despite that, some communities

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How Chef Danie Is Carving Out Space In The Culinary Industry For Women Of Color

Daniella Abraham (known as Chef Danie) has never been interested in playing it safe. The International Chef and Entrepreneur knew from childhood that her path to success would be in monetizing her talents even when the odds were stacked against her. 

The Miami-based, Le Cordon Bleu trained Chef realized from an early age that committing to her goals had to outweigh others’ doubts. Starting first with her decision to attend the prestigious school of culinary arts instead of accepting a full scholarship to the University of Miami for law.  “A lot of people told me not to,” she recalls. “They said I was just gonna be the help.” However, she was not deterred. “I wanted to take on the challenge and make the best of it. I didn’t want excuses standing in my way.”

Even when the hardships of life would provide every reason to give up on her culinary career, Abraham remained resilient. While followers now see her success and travel around the world, what most don’t know is her backstory of adversity. “I honestly can say I had all the odds stacked against me – from being kidnapped, molested, caught in a house fire and temporarily displaced, my car being stolen, a bad contract with a celebrity who refused to pay,  surviving suicide attempts and dealing with depression to now being able to truly say that I know my purpose,” she shares. “It has paid off and will continue to pay off because I’m not done yet. We as women have to have the audacity to persevere.”

Through it all, Abraham has made a name for herself. Running a full-scale experiential catering business, she has been linked to an A-list clientele: Pharrell Williams, Oprah Winfrey, Drake, Diddy as well as numerous pro athletes. Proving that there is a world full of opportunities available, Abraham also lends her talent to an international clientele through consulting- including once relocating to Dubai to open three restaurants for her Emirati clients. 

Her fighting spirit and commitment to greatness is the foundation of the lucrative career she has built. Here she shares some of her best advice for entrepreneurs trying to find their own path to success. 

Explore All Of Your God-Given Talents

Abraham recognized early that she had a gift for bringing people together and making them feel good through her cooking abilities. Her first culinary job was baking treats in middle school and selling her creations to friends – 50 cents for a cupcake and a dollar for a pack of cookies. “No one planted that seed,” she explains. “That was something for me, honestly, it was just something that made me really, really happy. And it was an outlet to escape, therapeutic wise. If it wasn’t music, it was always food. And I realized how that made other people feel. So it just made sense to make money from it.” 

Bet On Yourself, Despite It All 

One of Abraham’s first big

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