Women in music face so much more criticism than men

Dua Lipa believes female musicians face “so much more criticism” than their male counterparts.



Dua Lipa holding a sign posing for the camera


© Bang Showbiz
Dua Lipa

The ‘Don’t Start Now’ hitmaker has insisted she feels the need to hold herself to a higher standard than many of her male pop rivals, because the music industry often writes female artists off as “manufactured”.

In a preview clip of her interview on ‘CBS Sunday Morning’ – which will air this Sunday (06.12.20), she said: “As a female artist, especially in the pop genre, people immediately think you’re manufactured … no one believes that you write these songs yourself.

“We’re met with so much more criticism in terms of like what we wear, what we’re doing, what the performance looks like, how we’re dancing, how we’re singing, if we’re singing.”

Dua’s comments come after the 25-year-old singer made similar claims during a separate interview last month.

She said at the time: “That’s just being a woman in the industry. A lot of people see it, particularly in pop music, that you’re manufactured or whatever, so you have this underlying pressure or anxiety to constantly prove [yourself] to people, especially when you write your own lyrics.

“You have to work a little bit harder to be taken seriously.”

Dua added that whilst making her self-titled debut album, she felt she “needed to prove” that she “was not just going to sit there in the room and wait for somebody to write a song for me”.

The ‘Levitating’ hitmaker also spoke about standing up for herself against sexism in the industry, as she recalled one instance when a director asked her to wear a skirt during a music video.

She explained: “You’re on a music video and the director goes, ‘I definitely think you need to wear a skirt’ – because someone wants to see, you know, ‘UK’s pop star in a cute outfit. I’m like, ‘Well, I’m going to wear trousers because it’s f****** freezing.’ I know how to stand my ground and hold it down.

“We’re so used to pushing it away and saying something just to turn it off and be, like, this isn’t a big deal. I’ve always been someone to check [a person] straight away. If someone’s saying something [that I don’t agree with], ‘I’m not going to do that, I’m going to do this.’ ”

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The rock star of retail: how Topshop changed the face of fashion | Life and style

“What’s this I’m reading in the paper? It’s a load of absolute shit, that’s what it is. What’s the matter with you? Are you stupid or what? I’ve never read so much rubbish in my life.”

It was February 2010, and I was at my desk in the Guardian office. Philip Green didn’t need to introduce himself. His habit of bellowing down the phone was unmistakable, and I had just written an article about how I was falling out of love with Topshop after a decade being in thrall to its shop floor. Green never did take kindly to criticism of the golden child of his Arcadia empire.

Of the thousands of businesses that have been brought to their knees by the pandemic, Topshop is the most high-profile scalp; Arcadia Group collapsed into administration on Monday. In its prime, it was the most glamorous store the British high street has ever had. From late 1990 until a few years ago, it was the rock star of retail. Its dresses regularly featured on the pages of Vogue. Every Saturday, the 90,000 sq feet of its flagship store on Oxford Circus were packed with shoppers high on catwalk-adjacent clothes at accessible prices. When Beyoncé flew into London, the store opened an hour early so that she and her team could shop privately on their way to rehearsals. At London Fashion Week, where the brand staged a bi-annual show from 2005 until 2018, the Topshop front row regularly outshone designer labels with the glossiest celebrities, the sharpest new trends, the most copious champagne. At those catwalk shows, Green would position himself in the place of honour, with Anna Wintour on one side and Kate Moss on the other. He was the uncontested king of the high street.

The story of Topshop’s glory years – and of its fall – is closely tied to Green, but the story of its rise belongs to someone else. Topshop’s ascendancy was a phenomenon under the stewardship of Jane Shepherdson, several years before Green arrived. As brand director, Shepherdson created at Topshop the kind of brand that had never before existed. Until then, high street fashion had tended to fall into two generational camps. There were sensible skirts-and-blouses for grownups, and then there was “youth” fashion – basic denim, brightly coloured T-shirts, generically skimpy party dresses, cheap rip-offs of catwalk silhouettes. Topshop changed this, thanks to Shepherdson’s unerring taste and her eye for the best fashion school graduate talent with which to fill the design studio. Topshop offered high-fashion sophistication at a high street price. In 2006, Paolo Roversi shot a Topshop advertising campaign between shooting covers for Italian Vogue.

Jane Shepherdson.
Jane Shepherdson. Photograph: Sophia Evans/The Observer

Fashion is never just about clothes, and Topshop on a Saturday in the noughties was a playground. The democratisation of style that it represented felt like a progressive and cheering development, and the loud music and video screens lent the stores a festival mood. There were on-floor stylists and walk-up nail bars.

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Black Friday 2020 clothing deals: Big sales at Lululemon, Coach, The North Face, Under Armour, Nordstrom, more

Loungewear may be your stay-at-home clothing choice for this year, but that doesn’t mean you can’t spice up your wardrobe — or simply replenish it.

Plenty of popular brands and department stores are offering sitewide specials for Black Friday on clothing, shoes, jewelry and accessories.

That includes Lululemon, which rarely discounts its items, as well as big-name companies like Adidas and Under Armour.

Below is a big list of all the Black Friday 2020 clothing deals happening online right now from major retailers, specifically apparel and fashion brands.

Adidas

The sportswear retailer is offering up to 50% off sitewide.

Alo Yoga

To stock up on some new workout gear, the yoga apparel brand is offering up to 70% off sitewide.

Anthropologie

Urban Outfitter’s sister brand is offering an extra 30% off all items.

Coach

The popular handbag designer is holding a massive Black Friday 2020 sale on its outlet site where everything is 70% off.

Here are some noteworthy handbag deals and gifts that are part of the Coach Outlet sale:

Lululemon

The beloved fitness apparel brand is holding yet another rare sale for Black Friday.

Here are some highlights:

Nike

While not positioned as Black Friday sale, the apparel company is offering 20% off on select products.

Nordstrom

The department store is already offering Cyber Deals that are up to 50% off on “more than a thousand items” through Dec. 1.

Nordstrom Rack

You can find Ugg boots, slippers and shoes up to 60% off. Here are some noteworthy styles on sale:

You can also find jackets up to 65% off, along with gifts under $25.

Saks Off Fifth

You can score designer and luxury items for up to 85% off when you use promo code “BFSTEALS” at checkout.

The North Face

Known for its extremely popular Denali Fleece jackets, the outdoor apparel company continues to offer puffer coats and jackets for nearly 50% off.

The following coats and jackets are discounted:

  • Men’s Resolve 2 Jacket for $54, instead of $90
  • Women’s Osito Jacket for $59.40, instead of $99
  • Men’s Fleece Hoodie for $74.50, instead of $149

Under Armour

You can find popular clothing such as hoodies and outerwear discounted up to 50%. Receive free shipping on orders over $50.

Uniqlo

The Japanese retailer is holding a Black Friday kickoff event with discounts across the board.

Vera Bradley

The popular patterned handbag retailer has select styles up to 50% off.

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Nicolette Accardi can be reached at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter: @N_Accardi. Find NJ.com on Facebook. Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

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Canucks player kicks bride in the face at wedding reception during sultry dance, viral TikTok video shows

This newlywed really kicked up his heels at the reception.

Professional hockey player Adam Gaudette showed off his (failed) dance moves in a TikTok video taken at his wedding that has gone viral. In it, Gaudette accidentally kicks his bride, Micaela, in the face during their reception.

In the short clip, which has been viewed nearly 100,000 times as of Tuesday afternoon, the Vancouver Canucks center is seen shirtless sauntering up to his bride, who is sitting in a chair. He begins what appears to be a sultry dance of sorts.

After the short lap dance, the groom begins to show off by kicking his leg over the bride’s head – only to fall short and accidentally kick her in the face.

WOMAN SMACKS BOYFRIEND ON THE HEAD DURING DISNEYLAND PROPOSAL, SAYS SHE THOUGHT HE WAS ‘TROLLING’

In an extended version of the incident, the groom immediately stops and begins kissing his bride before ushering her off of the dance floor.

“I seem fine but my head was throbbing and I went into the bathroom and cried for a little,” the bride wrote in text over the video, along with a happy face emoji.

Adam Gaudette might want to retire his dancing career. (Photo by Andy Devlin/NHLI via Getty Images)

Adam Gaudette might want to retire his dancing career. (Photo by Andy Devlin/NHLI via Getty Images)

BRIDE SENDS ANGRY EMAIL TO COMPANY AFTER WEDDING DRESS ARRIVES INCORRECT, REALIZES SHE PUT IT ON INSIDE OUT

“He felt insanely bad but it was fine because we ended up partying until 8 am with our best friends,” a caption for the video read. The shorter clip’s caption read, “How my husband ruined our wedding part 1.”

The video was posted last week. According to Micaela’s Instagram, the pair got married on June 20. It is unclear where the wedding took place or what coronavirus regulations were enforced.

GROOMSMAN HAS ‘PERFECT’ RESPONSE TO REQUEST THAT HE SHAVE BEARD FOR WEDDING, ACCORDING TO REDDIT

Those who watched the hilariously botched burlesque on TikTok sympathized with the bride, commenting “I would’ve cried from the embarrassment and pain. Oh my god.”

Another gushed, “I love how concerned he was immediately for you though like goals.”

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The changing face of Ugandan fashion

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Ugandan top fashion designer Gloria Wavamunno is calling on her colleagues to tailor their businesses according to the local market.Uganda’s fashion industry is characterised by struggling ventures, semi-professional small-scale production, and lack of infrastructure, institutions and government support.And now the challenges have been exacerbated by the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.Wavamunno, who is the CEO and founder of Kampala Fashion Week, also suggests recycling second-hand clothes and collaboration among the stakeholders in order to survive in the current health crisis.”It is time for designers to think locally, and that their businesses do not have to be the same as international business models. In our creative industry, you have to see the clients because we are still more into tailoring than mass producing for shops,” the 35-year-old fashionista says.”So how do you keep yourself and your customer safe? How do you reduce your production costs? I know people look at second-hand clothes negatively, but they can be a boundless source of materials if you look at it in a different way. It can be where you find your zippers, buttons or re-purpose clothing and fabrics.”People want to be cost-efficient but the Covid-19 pandemic issues may push up costs,” she said. “When everything opens up people are going to double charge because they want to make their money back.”Creatives also need to put their minds together. I am a founding board member of the Fashion Council Uganda and we are trying to connect designers together. Through the Kampala Fashion Week, I have reached out to many designers. Now it is about bringing designers together and helping each other.”Wavamunno advises her counterparts to concentrate on the African market.”I believe in the business module of functioning locally to expand globally. Expanding globally does not necessarily mean that you have to travel to Western countries. Globally is just as well the African continent. You can source your things to Kenya, Rwanda, Nigeria, South Africa or Congo, among others.”Early influencesBorn in England and raised alternately between London and Kampala, Wavamunno studied at the Kampala International School in Uganda.Wavamunno says she was influenced into a life revolving around art by her mother, aunties and art teacher.”My character when I was younger was more introverted, a bit of a loner. I was drawn to art through artistic expression, whether dance, painting, singing or things instrumental like playing piano. These are things that caught my attention.””And my mother was into tailoring with her sisters, which they still are, and now more into design. So, I learnt to tailor my own pieces. I was cutting, stitching here and pinning there. I was expressing art in so many forms,” she adds.”My art teacher in boarding school, Mr Smalley, saw me sketching. My form of sketching was still life. I loved to do portraits, body forms that evolved into outfits.Smalley noticed that I liked sketching a lot of clothes. And art to me was an expression of how you

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Chelsea face Benfica, Manchester City land Gothenburg

Chelsea will play the Champions League newcomers Benfica next month for a place in the last 16 on their return to the competition after a year’s absence.



a group of young men playing a game of football: Photograph: Catherine Ivill/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

Emma Hayes’s team failed to qualify for last season’s tournament, having finished third in the league behind Arsenal and Manchester City, but have twice reached the semi-finals, losing to Wolfsburg in 2018 and Lyon in 2019.

Related: Fair Play: power games in the changing room of a women’s football team

Manchester City, also twice semi-finalists, will play the Swedish side Gothenburg. City have been knocked out by Atlético Madrid in the past two seasons, in the last 16 last season and a round earlier in 2019.

The most interesting tie of the round is between the holders, Lyon, and Juventus.

The Italian champions have failed to progress beyond the last 32 in their two attempts in their three-year history. Lyon have won the competition a record five times in a row and seven times in total, and their Norwegian forward Ada Hegerberg is the competition’s all-time top scorer with 53 goals. In August Lyon defeated Wolfsburg 3-1 in the final of a stunted single-leg competition in San Sebastian.



Pernille Harder, Sam Kerr, Sam Mewis playing football on a field: Chelsea’s Samantha Kerr runs at Manchester City’s defence during their Women’s Super League match in October.


© Photograph: Catherine Ivill/Getty Images
Chelsea’s Samantha Kerr runs at Manchester City’s defence during their Women’s Super League match in October.

The Scottish champions, Glasgow City, defeated the Icelandic team Valur on penalties, following a 1-1 draw in qualifying, to earn a tie against Sparta Prague.

The ties will take place over two legs on 9-10 and 15-16 December with the seeded team playing the second leg at home.

This year’s draw for last 32 had a slightly different format, with unseeded teams and seeded teams divided into four groups based on geographical locations to limit the distance travelled during the pandemic. The final will take place on the 16 May in Gothenburg.

Next season’s competition will be expanded to include a group stage which will also allow for the third-place finisher in the Women’s Super League to enter through qualifiers.

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I find these women’s face masks inappropriate

DEAR MISS MANNERS: Due to an unfortunate experience with Victorian novels and my dear grandmother, I was led to understand that the only things that should sparkle on a lady during the day are her wedding jewelry and her eyes.

Therefore, I have long been mystified to see, in daylight, perfectly ladylike women in sequin-covered evening wear as if they were appearing on TV.

Now, a few decades later, I have observed women at the office, the beach and the grocery store wearing sequins on random bits of clothing, including face masks. Can Miss Manners please update us on the proper wearing of sequins and other sparkling things for the modern lady?

GENTLE READER: Sparkly things should not be worn by grown-ups during the day. Neither should dangling earrings — but clearly only Miss Manners, you and the heroines of the unfortunate Victorian novels you’re reading know and follow the rules.

DEAR MISS MANNERS: I work at a very small cafe. Because of COVID-19, our indoor capacity is limited to 25%, which is a maximum of 10 people. In good weather, we can use our outdoor seating to accommodate an additional 10 to 14.

Yesterday, the weather was great, so we were very busy all day long. We currently close at 2 a.m., but last night, two women sat at one of our tables for almost an hour and a half after closing.

We had already taken down our sign, closed the checks for the four other tables, cleared their dishes, wiped off the tables, closed the registers, paid out tips, got our deposit ready, sent home the dishwasher and one of the cooks, and even turned off most of the lights inside.

Without being rude, how do you ask people to leave? The owner (and chef) finally went out and spoke with them nicely, and they left. But for over an hour, we felt stuck. How should we approach this next time without risking a bad review?

GENTLE READER: “I am sorry, but we are closing,” accompanied, perhaps, by an apologetic look at the “Closed” placard — a look that says, “I wish I could control the signs.”

DEAR MISS MANNERS: From time to time, I get a text or an email where someone gives me vastly personal information as they apologize. Someone just wrote me and said they are sorry they did not ship my package on time because on Saturday a family member died of pancreatic cancer.

How exactly am I supposed to respond? Do I focus on the condolences? Or do I say what is on my mind, which is that an apology really is not even necessary?

When I get these I always feel paralyzed. I just need to know how you would respond!

GENTLE READER: Yes, you should focus on the condolences. The recently bereaved are understandably disoriented and can have a misplaced sense of time, normalcy and how and when to share their unfortunate news. So yes, they may tend to over-explain. Miss

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Breaking down each of the 10 Big East teams the UConn women will face

Ahead of the Huskies’ first year back in the Big East, here’s a breakdown of what to expect from each of the conference’s 11 teams. Teams are presented in the order they were ranked in the Big East preseason poll.



Geno Auriemma, Doug Bruno are posing for a picture: Long-time friends Geno Auriemma, (left) head coach of the UConn Huskies, and Doug Bruno, (right) head coach of the DePaul Blue Demons, have a laugh before the start of their game at McGrath-Phillips Arena in Chicago.


© Cloe Poisson / Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
Long-time friends Geno Auriemma, (left) head coach of the UConn Huskies, and Doug Bruno, (right) head coach of the DePaul Blue Demons, have a laugh before the start of their game at McGrath-Phillips Arena in Chicago.

1. UConn

Coach: Geno Auriemma (36th year). Last season: 29-3, 16-0 AAC; conference regular season and tournament champions.

The skinny: The Huskies return to the Big East after an undefeated run in the AAC (139-0, combined 14 regular season and tournament titles). Come spring, they’ll look to extend their Final Four streak to 13 straight appearances (21 overall) with an eye on bringing home a 12th national championship.

Need to know: UConn lost top scorers Megan Walker and Crystal Dangerfield but returns three starters (Christyn Williams, Olivia Nelson-Ododa and Anna Makurat) and top reserve Aubrey Griffin. Strong freshman class has been turning heads so far in practice.

2. DePaul

Coach: Doug Bruno (35th year). Last season: 28-5, 15-3 in Big East; conference regular season and tournament champions. Plays UConn: TBA

The skinny: DePaul held a pretty firm hold on the Big East following conference realignment, winning five of the last seven tournament titles and at least a share of six regular season crowns. Enter UConn. Bruno, who has led his team to 17 consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances, is still looking for his first win over longtime friend Auriemma.

Need to know: The Blue Demons, ranked No. 19 in the preseason AP poll, graduated top scorer Chante Stonewall and point guard Kelly Campbell but bring back a trio of guards in Sonya Morris (15.6 points per game), Deja Church (10.8 points per game) and Lexi Held (15.4 points per game) who combined to average just under 42 points per game last year.

3. Marquette

Coach: Megan Duffy (second year). Last season: 24-8, 13-5 (2). Plays UConn: TBA

The skinny: Duffy’s squad exceeded expectations last year in her first year in Milwaukee: Marquette came in ninth in the preseason conference poll before finishing with the second-best Big East record and falling to DePaul in the Big East Tournament championship game.

Need to know: Marquette returns three starters from last season, including top scorer Selena Lott (15.5 points per game), who was named to the All-Big East Second Team last year, and Big East All-Tournament Team selection Lauren Van Kleunen (11.8 points per game).

4. St. John’s

Coach: Joe Tartamella (ninth year). Last season: 19-12, 11-7 (t-3). Plays UConn: TBA

The skinny: In the conference’s second tier of teams, St. John’s was on the cusp of another 20-win season and postseason berth prior to the season being cut short.

Need to know: Returns two starters, both of whom were the top scorers from last year: Qadashah Hoppie (15.4 points per

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Nearly 5,000 jobs at risk as UK fashion chains face closure

  • Around 4,700 jobs are at risk as the struggling Edinburgh Woollen Mill Group said Thursday it had failed to find a buyer for its fashion chains Peacocks and Jaeger.
  • UK fashion sales have plummeted during the pandemic, and England’s second national lockdown, which means all non-essential stores have to shut, could make this even worse.
  • The administrators in charge of the chains remain hopeful that a deal can be secured, and added that said no redundancies or store closures have been confirmed yet.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Nearly 5,000 jobs are at risk after the owner of British fashion chains Peacocks and Jaeger said Thursday it had failed to find a buyer for the troubled businesses, as the industry continues to struggle with dwindling sales amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The two chains, which are owned by the struggling Edinburgh Woollen Mill Group (EWM) retailing empire, have been put into a form of bankruptcy protection after a two-week deadline to find a buyer passed.

A spokesperson for EWM said the deterioration of the retail sector during the current, second lockdown in England had made the sale process “more complex” than hoped. During the lockdown, which is due to last until December 2, all shops selling items deemed as non-essential, such as clothes and books, have been required to close.

As a result, the spokesperson said the company could no longer extend a so-called standstill arrangement that Britain’s High Court first imposed six weeks ago and allows the chains to carry on doing business.

“Therefore, as directors, we have taken the desperately difficult decision to place Peacocks and Jaeger into administration while those talks continue,” the spokesperson said.

The administrators put in charge of the chains remain hopeful that a deal can be secured.

“Jaeger and Peacocks are attractive brands that have suffered the well-known challenges that many retailers face at present,” said Tony Wright, joint administrator and a partner at insolvency firm FRP Advisory.

“We are in advanced discussions with a number of parties and working hard to secure a future for both businesses.”

Read more: Luxury fashion is surging on TikTok, but turning Gen-Z viewers into customers is a complicated task for brands

Cardiff-based Peacocks operates 423 stores with 4,369 staff, while Jaeger runs 76 stores and concessions and employs 347 staff.

The administrators said no redundancies or store closures have been confirmed yet.

EWM Group had already placed its Edinburgh Woollen Mill and Ponden Home businesses into administration earlier this month.

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Nearly 5,000 Jobs at Risk as UK Fashion Chains Face Closure | Business News

LONDON (AP) — Nearly 5,000 jobs are at risk after the owner of British fashion chains Peacocks and Jaeger said Thursday it had failed to find a buyer for the troubled businesses, which like others in the sector are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic.

The two chains, which are owned by the struggling EWM retailing empire, have been put into a form of bankruptcy protection after a two-week deadline to find a buyer passed.

A spokesperson for EWM said the deterioration of the retail sector during the current, second lockdown in England had made the sale process “more complex” than hoped. During the lockdown, which is due to last until Dec. 2, all shops selling items deemed as non-essential, such as clothes and books, have been required to close.

As a result, the spokesperson said the company could no longer extend a so-called standstill arrangement that Britain’s High Court first imposed six weeks ago and allows the chains to carry on doing business.

“Therefore, as directors, we have taken the desperately difficult decision to place Peacocks and Jaeger into administration while those talks continue,” the spokesperson said.

The administrators put in charge of the chains remain hopeful that a deal can be secured.

“Jaeger and Peacocks are attractive brands that have suffered the well-known challenges that many retailers face at present,” said Tony Wright, joint administrator and a partner at insolvency firm FRP Advisory. “We are in advanced discussions with a number of parties and working hard to secure a future for both businesses.”

Cardiff-based Peacocks operates 423 stores with 4,369 staff, while Jaeger runs 76 stores and concessions and employs 347 staff.

The administrators said no redundancies or store closures have been confirmed yet.

EWM Group had already placed its Edinburgh Woollen Mill and Ponden Home businesses into administration earlier this month.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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