South Dakota’s governor encouraged people to go shopping the same day the state reported its highest single-day COVID-19 death total



a close up of Kristi Noem in a striped shirt: South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem speaks during the Republican National Convention in August. Photo Courtesy of the Committee on Arrangements for the 2020 Republican National Committee via Getty Images


© Photo Courtesy of the Committee on Arrangements for the 2020 Republican National Committee via Getty…
South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem speaks during the Republican National Convention in August. Photo Courtesy of the Committee on Arrangements for the 2020 Republican National Committee via Getty Images

  • The South Dakota Department of Health on Saturday reported 54 new deaths from COVID-19, surpassing the state’s previous record death total of 53.
  • The same day, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem encouraged state residents in a tweet to go shopping, writing that small “businesses are the lifeblood of so many South Dakota communities.”
  • Noem, a Republican, has refused to issue a statewide mask mandate and has otherwise disputed science and calls to enact stricter measures to contain the virus in the state.
  • Over the past week, more than 42% of COVID-19 tests in South Dakota administered have come back positive, according to data analyzed by Johns Hopkins University. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The South Dakota Department of Health on Saturday reported 54 new COVID-19 deaths since Friday, the highest single-day increase in deaths of all time in the state as cases of the virus surge statewide.

The previous record, 53, was set earlier this month on November 14, the Rapid City Journal reported. As the outlet noted, there have been 942 deaths in the state from the disease caused by the novel coronavirus since the pandemic began, with more than half of those — 517 — occurring in the month of November. There were more than 800 new cases diagnosed in the state Saturday.

But hours earlier, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, encouraged state residents to go shopping to support local businesses.

“Remember, today is #SmallBusinessSaturday,” Noem tweeted Saturday morning. “These businesses are the lifeblood of so many South Dakota communities. Please support them today and every day! #shopsmall.”

Earlier in the week, Noem, who has been in office since 2019, celebrated the Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s restrictions that imposed limits on capacity at religious services to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

“Another thing to add to the list of reasons to be very thankful today,” Noem said in a tweet Thursday.

In addition to refusing to issue a statewide mask mandate, Noem has also defended individuals who neglect to wear masks despite repeated recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and health experts who have pleaded that widespread adoption of mask-wearing would curb the spread of the disease.

A CDC study in Kansas reported last week reaffirmed that mask mandates are effective in curbing the spread of COVID-19.

“We talk often about the government’s role in a situation like this in dealing with a pandemic,” Noem said on November 18, disputing that the lack of a mask mandate was responsible for a surge in cases, according to The Associated Press. “At this point, frankly, I’m getting more concerned about how neighbors are treating neighbors.”

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In Japan, more people died from suicide last month than from Covid in all of 2020. And women have been impacted most | World News

“They lost their jobs, and they need to raise their kids, but they didn’t have any money,” Ozora said. “So, they attempted suicide.”

Most of the calls come through the night — from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. The nonprofit’s 600 volunteers live around the world in different timezones and are awake to answer them. But there aren’t enough volunteers to keep up with the volume of messages, Ozora said.

They prioritize the texts that are most urgent — looking for keywords such as suicide or sexual abuse. He said they respond to 60% of texts within five minutes, and volunteers spend an average of 40 minutes with each person.

Anonymously, over online messaging, people share their deepest struggles. Unlike most mental health hotlines in Japan, which take requests over the phone, Ozora says many people — especially the younger generation — are more comfortable asking for help via text.

In April, he said the most common messages were from mothers who were feeling stressed about raising their kids, with some confessing to thoughts of killing their own children. These days, he says messages from women about job losses and financial difficulties are common — as well as domestic violence.

“I’ve been accepting messages, like ‘I’m being raped by my father’ or ‘My husband tried to kill me,'” Ozora said. “Women send these kinds of texts almost every day. And it’s increasing.” He added that the spike in messages is because of the pandemic. Before, there were more places to “escape,” like schools, offices or friend’s homes.

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In Japan, more people died from suicide last month than from Covid in all of 2020. And women have been impacted most | World

“They lost their jobs, and they need to raise their kids, but they didn’t have any money,” Ozora said. “So, they attempted suicide.”

Most of the calls come through the night — from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. The nonprofit’s 600 volunteers live around the world in different timezones and are awake to answer them. But there aren’t enough volunteers to keep up with the volume of messages, Ozora said.

They prioritize the texts that are most urgent — looking for keywords such as suicide or sexual abuse. He said they respond to 60% of texts within five minutes, and volunteers spend an average of 40 minutes with each person.

Anonymously, over online messaging, people share their deepest struggles. Unlike most mental health hotlines in Japan, which take requests over the phone, Ozora says many people — especially the younger generation — are more comfortable asking for help via text.

In April, he said the most common messages were from mothers who were feeling stressed about raising their kids, with some confessing to thoughts of killing their own children. These days, he says messages from women about job losses and financial difficulties are common — as well as domestic violence.

“I’ve been accepting messages, like ‘I’m being raped by my father’ or ‘My husband tried to kill me,'” Ozora said. “Women send these kinds of texts almost every day. And it’s increasing.” He added that the spike in messages is because of the pandemic. Before, there were more places to “escape,” like schools, offices or friend’s homes.

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Health expert urges people to be courteous, use precautions if shopping on Black Friday

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, going shopping in crowded stores on Black Friday is a ‘higher risk activity.’

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Black Friday is upon us, and it’s a time for big savings but also big crowds. 

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, going shopping in crowded stores just before, on or after Thanksgiving is a higher risk activity that people should avoid to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. 

ABC10 health expert Dr. Payal Kohli also does not recommend participating in Black Friday during the pandemic. She stressed the importance of finding alternatives to shopping in busy stores this holiday. 

“If you can, please try to do online shopping this year. That’s what I’m doing; I’m going to try to avoid the stores,” Dr. Kohli said. “As it is, it’s a bit of a hassle to go to the stores, but this year in particular, online is the safest thing to do especially if you’re considered high risk.”

But if people must shop in stores this Black Friday, she suggested some precautions for people to consider.

Make a list, so you can get in and get out of a store quickly. Dr. Kohli said the last thing you want to do is loiter in a busy store.

“Spend some time doing homework so you can be prepared,” she said. 

She said to be aware of what you’re touching and to treat any surface you touch as if it’s contaminated.

“Immediately sanitize your hands right after, (and) be mindful about touching your face as well,” Dr. Kohli said. 

She also said to be mindful of your distance from other people- per the usual, staying at least six feet away is your best bet. 

And of course, common courtesy and treating store workers with respect and dignity is always a wonderful practice during the holidays. This year that happens to include wearing a mask. 

“Don’t make them ask you. Don’t be confrontational. I know it’s uncomfortable. I know it’s inconvenient, but really just do it as a gesture of good will,” she said.

Dr. Kohli also suggested checking out store guidelines before heading out. They can let you know if there is a customer limit and if the store is cleaning regularly. Most stores have the procedures and precautions they’re taking on their websites.  

Stores brace for Black Friday changes | Business Headlines


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A different Black Friday experience: In Holyoke, For the Love of Good Foundation provides free clothing to people in need

HOLYOKE — It was Black Friday, and Esperanza Quinones was out picking out a few things.

In her bag were some essentials. A couple of blouses. A comforter. A pair of boots.

“I only take what I need. I don’t take what I don’t need,” she said.

Quinones’ Black Friday experience was not spent going shoulder to shoulder with shoppers at the mall, but in the parking lot of Kate’s Kitchen at Providence Ministries for the Needy on Hamilton Street. There, she and several others looked through stacks of donated, second-hand clothing arranged on a tarp in the middle of the lot.

The clothing — shirts, pants, shoes, sweaters and even some jackets — were there for anyone in need, at no cost, and without question or judgment, said Kevin Joslyn, president of the For the Love of Good Foundation.

“We don’t turn anyone away,” he said. “We don’t care who you worship or who you love. If you’re cold and hungry we want to help you. Simple as that.”

Joslyn, a retired correctional officer with the Hampden County Sheriff’s Department, founded the organization two years ago to help the homeless, and people he calls “struggling neighbors” — those on the margins who have a place to stay but not much else.

In the two years since the Foundation has been conducting the clothing giveaways, it has helped an estimated 3,700 people.

For the Love of Good partners with Kate’s Kitchen once a month.

Kate’s Kitchen provides food to people who need it. For the Love of Good spreads out its tarp in the parking lot to provide clothing to those who need that.

Often, there’s an overlap.

“They average 100 to 150 people a day, so that means we can potentially get 150 people coming over here,” he said Friday.

It’s common to see people go to the kitchen for food and then cross the parking lot to look through the clothing. Or vice versa.

The wiser members of the clientele check through the clothing first and then get food, he said, “Because if you wait until after the food, all the good stuff (in the foundation’s pile) may be gone.”

While talking with a reporter, a young man comes up to say he heard they have a pair of overalls. He says he needs a pair for his job but can’t afford them. Josyln leads him over to his trailer to show him the overalls, a brand-new donated pair.

But they are the wrong size. Joslyn shows him some work pants — but they do not fit either, and the man leaves empty handed.

Asked how he thinks the man heard about the overalls, Joslyn said word tends to spread through the neighborhood pretty quickly that the foundation is there and what sort of things are available.

By the trailer are a handful of brand-new sleeping bags, boxes of gloves and hats. ”If we see someone who says

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Couple uses catering deposit from canceled wedding to feed 200 people on Thanksgiving

Emily Bugg and Billy Lewis got married at City Hall amid COVID-19.

Emily Bugg, 33, and Billy Lewis, 34, used their $5,000 nonrefundable deposit to purchase 200 Thanksgiving dinners for clients of Thresholds, a nonprofit mental health provider dedicated to helping people with serious mental illnesses and substance use conditions.

“In the grand scheme of things, canceling a big wedding isn’t the worst thing that could happen,” Bugg, an outreach worker at Thresholds, told “Good Morning America.” ” We’re happy to be married, and we’re so happy that we could help Thresholds’ clients feel the connection of a Thanksgiving meal as a result of the wedding cancellation.”

Bugg and Lewis were married Oct. 1st at City Hall in Chicago. The couple met on the dating app Bumble in 2017.

PHOTO: Emily Bugg, 33, and Billy Lewis, 34, used their $5,000 nonrefundable catering deposit for 200 Thanksgiving dinners. The recipients were clients of Thresholds, a nonprofit mental health provider.

When COVID-19 disrupted their initial wedding gathering, Bugg and Lewis decided to team up with their with caterer, Big Delicious Planet, to make Thanksgiving dinners for Thresholds clients. The meals included turkey, vegetables and mashed potatoes.

Bugg and Lewis’s venue, Salvage One, agreed to put their deposit toward a future event for the Epilepsy Foundation, which is another cause to which Bugg is connected.

Thresholds’ yearly communal Thanksgiving dinners were canceled because of COVID-19 restrictions.

“Emily’s donation is an incredible example of the generosity and creativity that the pandemic has inspired in so many,” said Mark Ishaug, CEO of Thresholds. “I know that Emily’s act of kindness will inspire others to do the same and build love and connection in a difficult time, in any way we can.”

“Thresholds is so grateful for our staff, like Emily, who are so dedicated to their work serving those with mental illnesses,” he added.

Thresholds staff boxed the meals with caterers, and then Thresholds staff delivered the meals to clients’ homes ahead of the holiday.

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Patrick Duffy says Linda Purl romance is a ‘gift’ | People



Patrick Duffy says Linda Purl romance is a 'gift'

Patrick Duffy sees Linda Purl as the “gift that COVID gave [him]”.

The 71-year-old actor started dating Linda, 65, during the coronavirus lockdown earlier this year, and he admits that their romance evolved amid a unique set of circumstances.

Patrick said: “That’s the gift that COVID gave me – Linda Purl is the lady in my life.”

The actor’s wife Carlyn Rosser died almost four years ago from a heart attack, and he wasn’t actively looking for a relationship when he was reintroduced to Linda.

However, he’s now convinced that their burgeoning romance is the result of “fate”.

Patrick – who was married to Carlyn from 1974 until her death in 2017 – told ‘Extra’: “I wasn’t looking for it. I didn’t feel I needed it … and then fate just went ‘swoosh!’ and changed the perspective.

“We started texting and then FaceTiming and then Zooming … We did a two-to-three-hour Zoom every single night … You get to know somebody really well when you do that.”

The actor – who played Bobby Ewing in ‘Dallas’ – loved chatting to Linda during the lockdown, and once restrictions were eased, he wasted no time in rushing to see her.

He shared: “At the end of those two and half months, we were feeling a little different than just casual friendship, so I packed up my car, I drove 20 hours, and I was on her doorstep.

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‘I stand by women having a boss attitude’: Rita Ora calls for equal rights for female artists | People



'I stand by women having a boss attitude': Rita Ora calls for equal rights for female artists

Rita Ora says women in the music industry still have to fight “every day” for equal pay and rights.

The 30-year-old singer-and-actress is proud to have sustained a successful career, but says there is still a long way to go before female stars are treated as equals to their male counterparts.

Speaking to Numero Berlin magazine – of which she is the cover star – Rita said: “We as women are fighting every day to have equal pay, to have an equal voice, to be able to not be judged, to express our femininity in a way where it doesn’t undermine our power.

“Those are things that we fight for every day. Gender equality is something that I stand for. I’m very passionate about it.

“I stand by equal rights, I stand by freedom of speech and I stand by women having a boss attitude.”

She added: “For me, the defining moment is sustaining my career. Being able to still sit here today, take incredible photos, be able to talk about my career 10 years on.

“I think that’s a big achievement for artists. And to be able to sustain something for me and have the next chapter of my life and still be in the business is really amazing.”

As well as her chart success, Rita has starred in the ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ franchise, had a cameo in ‘Southpaw’ alongside Jake Gyllenhaal and voiced Dr. Ann Laurent in ‘Detective Pikachu’.

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Here’s what people are shopping for on ‘Black Friday week’

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Photo (c) leolintang – Getty Images

This year, thanks to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Black Friday has been extended from just one day to most of the month of November. Deals are increasing this week as the official kickoff to the holiday shopping season approaches.

According to BestBlackFriday.com, most retailers are staging week-long sales promotions that lack the “OMG doorbuster” deals from previous years. But the savings are there, especially when it comes to technology and gadgets.

The iPhone 12 is reportedly high on many people’s gift lists this year. Other tech items consumers say they want to find under the tree are video game consoles, which got a workout as people spent a lot more time at home during the pandemic.

BestBlackFriday’s survey of consumers about what tech gifts they valued most found 17 percent asked for a Playstation 5 and 9 percent wanted an Xbox Series X/S.

Fourteen percent requested smart devices for the home and 7 percent hoped for a foldable phone in their stockings.

Just three retailers

The survey also shows that 64 percent of consumers planned to do the bulk of their shopping at three retailers — Amazon, Walmart, and Target.

“We’re seeing that U.S. consumers are prioritizing electronics purchases and flocking to online marketplaces as many face new `stay at home’ orders,” said David Sykes, Head of U.S. at Klarna, a payments and shopping service. “Recent Wish List data from the Klarna app echoes these trends, showing that shoppers across all age demographics are particularly interested in personal electronics, footwear and home items as we enter the holiday season.”

Klarna’s survey of consumers also reveals a gift list top-heavy with technology products. The top 10 requested gifts are:

  1. Apple AirPod Pro

  2. Nike Air Force 1

  3. Nintendo Switch

  4. Gramercy Kitchen Glass Food Storage Containers

  5. Vans Canvas Old Skool

  6. MacBook Pro

  7. Apple iPhone 12

  8. Apple Watch Series 5

  9. Adidas Superstar Athletic Shoe

  10. Food Network Acacia Wood Salad Bowl Set

Electronics sale growing faster than other categories

Consumers have already made a lot of electronics purchases. Klarna’s app data showed that the share of wallet in the electronics category grew by 15 percent in the week ended November 15 compared to the previous week – the most of any category during the comparison period. 

The company said this was especially pronounced among Gen Zers and Baby Boomers, who increased their share of wallet in the category by 19 percent and 21 percent, respectively, week over week.

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NYC synagogue is fined $15,000 for hosting 7,000 maskless people at a huge wedding

A New York City synagogue has been fined $15,000 for hosting 7,000 maskless people at a huge wedding, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday. 

On November 8, crowds gathered in the Yetev Lev temple in Brooklyn to celebrate the nuptials of Yoel Teitelbaum, grandson of Satmar Grand Rabbi Aaron Teitelman. 

Confirming the fine de Blasio told New York 1: ‘That’s just not acceptable, I mean, we’ve been through so much. This was amazingly irresponsible, just unacceptable.’

He added: ‘There appeared to be a real effort to conceal it which is absolutely unacceptable. There will be a summons for $15,000 immediately for that site and there could be additional consequences quite soon as well.’ 

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On November 8, crowds gathered in the Yetev Lev temple in Brooklyn to celebrate the nuptials of Yoel Teitelbaum, grandson of Satmar Grand Rabbi Aaron Teitelman

On November 8, crowds gathered in the Yetev Lev temple in Brooklyn to celebrate the nuptials of Yoel Teitelbaum, grandson of Satmar Grand Rabbi Aaron Teitelman

The mayor noted Monday 'there appeared to be a real effort to conceal' the wedding

The mayor noted Monday ‘there appeared to be a real effort to conceal’ the wedding 

Confirming the $15k fine de Blasio called the wedding  'amazingly irresponsible and unacceptable'

Confirming the $15k fine de Blasio called the wedding  ‘amazingly irresponsible and unacceptable’

Organizers kept the wedding secret after state officials canceled an earlier Satmar wedding, The New York Post reported, citing a Yiddish newspaper, Der Blatt. 

To keep the celebration under wraps, the community had shared information on the wedding only by word of mouth as organizers schemed to avoid it being broken up by ‘the ravenous press and government officials’. 

Religious gatherings can be held indoors, but they must take place in one room and at 50 percent capacity. Masks must also be worn and those who are not in the same household must maintain social distancing from each other. 

De Blasio said it is not clear just exactly how many people were at the wedding. 

But images of the ceremony show the 7,000 capacity hall rammed with no masks in sight as the community celebrated. 

The crowd crammed into the wedding even as coronavirus cases in the city and state rise with de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo threatening further lockdowns if the outbreak isn’t taken back under control.  

Cuomo had said of the gathering: ‘If that happened, it was a blatant disregard of the law. It’s illegal. It was also disrespectful of the people of New York.’

New York City was once the epicenter of the pandemic and has seen nearly 25,000 deaths. The state has averaged nearly 5,500 new confirmed cases per day over the past seven days. 

'This was amazingly irresponsible, just unacceptable', de Blasio said of the wedding

‘This was amazingly irresponsible, just unacceptable’, de Blasio said of the wedding

Hospitals and nursing homes have reported 665 COVID-19 deaths in the state over the past 30 days — more than in July, August and September combined. 

‘Due to the ongoing situation with government restrictions, preparations were made secretly and discreetly, so as not to draw attention from strangers,’ reported Yiddish newspaper Der Blatt, the publication of the Satmar sect. on November 13, according to the New York Post.

‘In recent weeks, organizers worked tirelessly to arrange everything in the best way possible. 

‘All notices about upcoming celebrations

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