Watch a Sneak Peek at Stylish With Jenna Lyons, Your New Favorite Fashion Reality TV Show

Are you a sucker for early aughts and 2010s reality shows like Kell on Earth, The Rachel Zoe Project and House of DVF? If so, get ready for another quite glamorous ride.

Watch a Sneak Peek at Stylish With Jenna Lyons, Your New Favorite Fashion Reality TV Show

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It’s been a while since a fashion-inspired series really captivated our attention the way some of these formative ones did. And that’s a hard thing to do in 2020, when the fashion industry itself has been forced to reckon with its historic lack of inclusivity. How do you premiere a show about designer shoes and luxurious, expensive goods without seeming, well, completely out of touch?

That’s certainly a big challenge, but one new series does a pretty good job of engaging us in a way that doesn’t feel trite. Set to premiere Thursday, Dec. 3 on HBO Max, Stylish With Jenna Lyons follows the titular former J. Crew executive, who The New York Times once credited as “the woman who dresses America,” as she reimagines her career years after making pops of color and monochromatic dressing mainstream.

The Canceled Reality Shows Viewers Still Love

In a documentary- and competition-style format, she’s joined by her (very loveable) chief of staff Kyle DeFord and (ultra fashionable) stylist Sarah Clary to interview potential associates tasked with pleasing her throughout a series of challenges. And in an exclusive sneak peek at episode two, Lyons meets with the contestants (a.k.a. potential new hires) after they’ve been asked to present a look that successfully interprets what it means to dress in a “high-low” format.

With her signature wide-rim glasses and preppy style, she meets with each aspiring worker bee as Sarah models the outfits they put together. The preview finds Lyons giving her tips and tricks to contestant Kye, who impressed Lyons with the way she used proportions, but failed to make the expensive clothing item (that cable-knit sweater) stand out.



John Lydon et al. in a room: Squire Fox / HBO Max


© Provided by E!
Squire Fox / HBO Max

Elsewhere in the series, Lyons encourages the cast to select the right items for a pop-up shop she’s working on. And in another episode, Lyons and her team welcome celebrities like Charlize Theron and Patricia Arquette to a red carpet photo booth they built at the SAG Awards.

Ready to revisit those days spent watching America’s Next Top Model and Project Runway? Then give this a shot.

Stylish With Jenna Lyons premieres Dec. 3 on HBO Max.

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Google’s Shopping Gift Guide will show you what everyone’s buying

Google has unveiled the Shopping Gift Guide, a microsite that lets you browse trending categories, compare prices and find local buying options. When you first launch it, you can go into product areas for chefs, athletes, techies, decorators, “wellness gurus,” gamers and kids. Once you click on the “techies” area, for instance, it shows top trending products including the Pixel 5, Apple Watch Series 6 and ASUS TUF Gaming GeForce RTX 3080.



graphical user interface, application: Google Gift Shopping Guide


Google Gift Shopping Guide

Selecting a specific product shows different retail options; for example if you’re interested in a Roku Express streaming player, you can get one directly from Roku, Office Depot or Walmart, with the cheapest option being directly from Roku. You can also see user reviews, similar products from the same manufacturer and rival products like the Amazon Fire TV Stick and Google’s own Chromecast.

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Other features include price tracking with alerts, store hours and the option for in-store or curbside pickup. A lot of these features are already available on Google Shopping, but the new gift guide brings them together into one site while adding the ability to browse categories.

In the new guide, Google was able to bake in its trend graphs, search and location smarts, things it has an edge on over its gigantic shopping rival, Amazon. If you need an authoritative guide to tech products, take a look at Engadget’s own Holiday Gift Guide, as well.

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At Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo, Students Show Off Their Personal Style

Describe your look.

My dress is from Perverze, tights are Chanel, fluffy jacket from Tsumori Chisato, and cowboy boots.

What do you love about Bunka Fashion College?

The people here are cool and interesting. It’s been great meeting and getting to know them.

How does it feel to physically be back at university?

It’s not 100%  normal, but it’s quite calm. I’m happy to be back, but I still miss the exciting vibes from crowds of students.

What song sums up your 2020?

Sakamoto Shinnosuke’s Stay Home.

Haruka Miura, 22, BA fashion global business, year four

 Haruka MiuraHoumi Sakata

Describe your look.

I’m wearing straight-leg, light-blue Levi’s with black Dr Martens six-eye boots, but the black Prada puffer jacket is the main attraction, of course.

What do you love about Bunka Fashion College?

The inspiring people you meet from all kinds of backgrounds. It’s also interesting to learn what their tastes are like through fashion and music.

How does it feel to physically be back at university?

I rarely met people during the self-isolation period, so I was happy to see my teacher and classmates for the first time in a while. It’s much easier to engage in class in person.

What song sums up your 2020?

Chloe X Halle’s Do it.

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Klarna launches Livestyle, a live fashion show powered by Bambuser’s Live Video Shopping

STOCKHOLM, Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Klarna, the leading global payments provider and shopping service, today announced the launch of Livestyle, a live fashion show powered by Bambuser‘s proprietary Live Video Shopping technology.

Since Bambuser’s launch of Live Video Shopping in late 2019, the retail phenomenon has in a short time become one of the hottest e-commerce trends and a challenger of traditional commerce, both in-store and online. 

Now Klarna and Bambuser have teamed up by launching Live Video Shopping directly in the Klarna app. Livestyle is the first of its kind in the western world and fully in line the company’s successful shift from a payment provider to take care of the entire shopping experience.

While many live shopping events focus on sales and promotions, Livestyle focuses on inspiring content that adds value and engages viewers. The show is led by the influencer and PR personality Roshi Hoss, along with star stylist Sara Biderman. New episodes of Livestyle will be released every week, and the show will be visited by several interesting guests and fashion experts.

Emilia de Poret, Fashion Director at Klarna said: Live shopping is sometimes described as a TV shop in budget format, but Livestyle can rather be described as a TV shop with extra everything. Sweden as a market was quick to catch up on live shopping, but so far we have only seen the beginning of this phenomenon. I think it will continue to be a big trend next year as well, but in a more refined form.

She continues: “For viewers to stay in this fast-paced format, it is essential to find the right balance of inspiration and entertainment to make the content feel believable and interesting. I think we have succeeded in this.

The first season of Livestyle is made together with NA-KD, and the first episode will be broadcast on December 7 directly in Klarna’s app and on NAKD.com.

Livestyle episodes:

  • December 7, 2020: Holidays Are Coming
  • December 14, 2020: Female Creators (Kvinnliga kreatörer)
  • December 21, 2020: Late Night Show (Uppesittarkväll)
  • December 28, 2020: Trend Spotting 2021 (Trendspaning 2021)
  • January 4, 2021: Back to work from home (WFH)

Contact information
Maryam Ghahremani, CEO Bambuser | +46 8 400 160 02 | [email protected]

About Bambuser
Bambuser is a software company specializing in interactive live video streaming. The Company’s primary product, Live Video Shopping, is a cloud-based software solution that is used by customers such as global e-commerce and retail businesses to host live shopping experiences on websites, mobile apps and social media. Bambuser was founded in 2007 and has its headquarters in Stockholm. Erik Penser Bank AB is Bambuser’s Certified Adviser.

This information was brought to you by Cision http://news.cision.com

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TODAY Show “Steals & Deals” Features Personalized Holiday Gift At 61% Off

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

BUFFALO GROVE, Ill., Nov. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Stationery Studio ( www.thestationerystudio.com ), the leader in premium personalized stationery and gifts, was excited to be a part of the TODAY show’s special Thanksgiving edition of “Steals & Deals” with TODAY show contributor Jill Martin. Martin introduced the Personalized Notecard Collection exclusive to The Stationery Studio. Today Show anchor Sheinelle Jones said, “I want everything!”

The Stationery Studio offered TODAY show viewers 30 different collections of personalized note cards. Collection includes 60 personalized notecards featuring 3 different designs (20 cards of each). Flat note card sizes are: 2 sets of standard sized cards (6.125″x 4.5″) and 1 set of petite sized cards (3.375″x 4.875″). Each collection includes coordinating blank white envelopes and arrives in a gift box with tissue ready for gift-giving. “This is always a popular one and always sells out fast,” said Today show contributor Jill Martin.

The personalized note cards are a great holiday gift idea during COVID-19 for those who may not be able to see their family this year. “Personalized stationery is a great way to stay connected while we are staying at home,” said Renee Redman, founder of The Stationery Studio. The Stationery Studio will be donating $1 from every purchase through the end of the year to the Feeding America COVID-19 Response Fund. “Food banks across the country need our help now more than ever and we’re happy to give back during this challenging time,” said Redman.

The Stationery Studio is the leader in premium personalized stationery and personalized gifts. TheStationeryStudio.com features more than 12,000 products that have been featured frequently in national press outlets including Associated Press (AP), Bustle, the TODAY show, Good Housekeeping, People Magazine, USA Today, Cheddar and more.

View original content: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/today-show-steals–deals-features-personalized-holiday-gift-at-61-off-301181252.html

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Tributes to Diego Maradona show how easily violence against women is ignored

Imagine a man hitting his partner. The picture that comes to mind probably involves a scruffy individual, his hand raised and his face contorted with fury. We can all condemn that, can’t we? But what if the angry face is familiar, seen thousands of times in a very different context? If it belongs, say, to the world’s most famous and admired footballer, Diego Maradona?



Diego Maradona et al. riding on the back of a bicycle: Photograph: Alessandra Tarantino/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Judging by the outpouring of grief that followed his death, at the age of 60, it seems too big an ask to admit that our heroes, especially our sporting heroes, have been credibly accused of domestic violence. Maradona’s face just doesn’t fit in that unpleasant picture – unless you’ve seen the video.

First aired on an Argentine TV channel six years ago, it appears to show Maradona hitting his then girlfriend, a former professional football player called Rocio Oliva, who was three decades his junior. Unsteady on his feet, Maradona shouts at her and then appears to strike her twice. The slaps are clearly audible on the soundtrack, as is Oliva shouting at him in Spanish: “Stop, stop.”

Maradona didn’t challenge the video’s authenticity, but he did deny hitting Oliva. “I grabbed the phone but I swear to God that I have never hit a woman,” he insisted. It wasn’t the first time Oliva accused Maradona of abusing her, although charges were never brought. Another incident occurred on a plane, in front of dozens of witnesses, when Maradona verbally abused Oliva before grabbing her by the neck. The couple split and got back together several times before Oliva left Maradona for good two years ago.



Diego Maradona et al. standing in front of a building: An image commemorating Diego Maradona in Naples, Italy, November 2020.


© Photograph: Alessandra Tarantino/AP
An image commemorating Diego Maradona in Naples, Italy, November 2020.

Maradona’s death on Wednesday happened to coincide with the international day for the elimination of violence against women. On the same day, official statistics revealed that a fifth of offences recorded by police in England and Wales during and immediately after the first national lockdown – amounting to more than a quarter of a million in three months – involved domestic abuse. These statistics might have given Maradona’s obituarists pause for thought, but they didn’t.

Domestic abuse is routinely overlooked or rendered invisible, especially if the alleged perpetrator is an elite sportsman or famous actor. When the Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius shot dead his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, commentators initially bought his story that he believed she was an intruder. It was only much later, and after protracted legal proceedings, that Pistorius was found guilty of murder.

Relationships in which women are abused are often described as volatile, depersonalising blame. But Maradona’s jealous outbursts – he once threw Oliva out of his home in Dubai after wrongly accusing her of flirting with the Manchester United goalkeeper, David de Gea – will be horribly familiar to any woman who has experienced coercive control.

Last month glowing tributes were paid to the Scottish actor Sean Connery – recipient of a knighthood, among

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Tributes to Diego Maradona show how easily violence against women is ignored | Domestic violence

Imagine a man hitting his partner. The picture that comes to mind probably involves a scruffy individual, his hand raised and his face contorted with fury. We can all condemn that, can’t we? But what if the angry face is familiar, seen thousands of times in a very different context? If it belongs, say, to the world’s most famous and admired footballer, Diego Maradona?

Judging by the outpouring of grief that followed his death, at the age of 60, it seems too big an ask to admit that our heroes, especially our sporting heroes, have been credibly accused of domestic violence. Maradona’s face just doesn’t fit in that unpleasant picture – unless you’ve seen the video.

First aired on an Argentine TV channel six years ago, it appears to show Maradona hitting his then girlfriend, a former professional football player called Rocio Oliva, who was three decades his junior. Unsteady on his feet, Maradona shouts at her and then appears to strike her twice. The slaps are clearly audible on the soundtrack, as is Oliva shouting at him in Spanish: “Stop, stop.”

Maradona didn’t challenge the video’s authenticity, but he did deny hitting Oliva. “I grabbed the phone but I swear to God that I have never hit a woman,” he insisted. It wasn’t the first time Oliva accused Maradona of abusing her, although charges were never brought. Another incident occurred on a plane, in front of dozens of witnesses, when Maradona verbally abused Oliva before grabbing her by the neck. The couple split and got back together several times before Oliva left Maradona for good two years ago.

Maradona’s death on Wednesday happened to coincide with the international day for the elimination of violence against women. On the same day, official statistics revealed that a fifth of offences recorded by police in England and Wales during and immediately after the first national lockdown – amounting to more than a quarter of a million in three months – involved domestic abuse. These statistics might have given Maradona’s obituarists pause for thought, but they didn’t.

Domestic abuse is routinely overlooked or rendered invisible, especially if the alleged perpetrator is an elite sportsman or famous actor. When the Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius shot dead his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, commentators initially bought his story that he believed she was an intruder. It was only much later, and after protracted legal proceedings, that Pistorius was found guilty of murder.

Relationships in which women are abused are often described as volatile, depersonalising blame. But Maradona’s jealous outbursts – he once threw Oliva out of his home in Dubai after wrongly accusing her of flirting with the Manchester United goalkeeper, David de Gea – will be horribly familiar to any woman who has experienced coercive control.

Last month glowing tributes were paid to the Scottish actor Sean Connery – recipient of a knighthood, among other honours – who had died at the age of 90. Like Maradona’s, his biography had an irresistible rags-to-riches element, with

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The Princess Diana Wedding Dress “The Crown” Didn’t Show

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Des Willie / Des Willie/Netflix

Season 4 of The Crown has been winning rave reviews, not only for its acting but for the incredible attention to detail in the show’s costumes.

And, of course, the biggest costume piece in this season was the gown worn by Princess Diana on her wedding day on July 29, 1981.

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, costume designer Amy Roberts revealed that she and her team had to get permission from the original wedding gown’s designers, Elizabeth and David Emanuel, to reproduce the dress for the show. Roberts consulted with David on the fabric, and he had shared some of his original designs — but she said that he had encouraged her to “have fun with the replica rather than obsessing over the details.”

“He wasn’t precious about it or neurotic about it. That released us from any fear,” Roberts said. “We just went for the feel of it, the look of it, the size of it. Big sleeves, big frills. We didn’t get too stressed. Maybe there’s 201 pearls and we’ve only done 200.”

In a behind-the-scenes featurette released earlier this month, Roberts said that the wedding dress took 14 weeks and five “long” fittings to make. However, despite all of that work, the gown is shown for only approximately 27 seconds in the last moments of Episode 3, “Fairytale.”

Since the show dropped on Nov. 15, many fans have expressed disappointment with the iconic gown’s brief appearance, especially as actor Emma Corrin is featured prominently wearing the dress in the show’s promotional materials.

They really spent 600 hours replicating that wedding dress and for what? I feel cheated given the build up in the trailers #TheCrown

Ok #TheCrown, you made me all excited about the replica of Diana’s wedding dress and did a cliffhanger of everyone getting dressed for the wedding, cut to Mark Thatcher getting lost in the desert?! COME ON

The Crown: hello look at me, the most expensive show on netflix. We recreated Diana’s wedding dress for just 10 seconds of screentime nbd.

The cast and crew of The Crown have spoken about the decision to cut the so-called wedding of the century from the show.

“We never re-create things just for the sake of re-creating them. I think if we do re-create a scene — like the engagement scene, for instance, when they do the announcement — it has to be because it’s linked to something that the characters are going through. It has to be part of the story. It has to further the plot, basically,” Corrin said in an interview with the Hollywood Reporter. “The wedding scene, you can YouTube it and you could be watching it in 10 seconds, so I

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Outrage as Italian TV show gives ‘sexy shopping’ advice

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Hanifa’s Viral Fashion Show Changed Modeling Forever

Every now and then, a designer comes along and completely reimagines fashion as we know it. Hanifa is one such disruptor. Earlier this year, as brands scrambled to respond to the coronavirus pandemic and retool their seasonal presentations, Hanifa made an unprecedented decision to host a virtual fashion show with silhouettes of 3D models on the runway. The one-of-a-kind production immediately went viral.

“I stumbled upon the 3D stuff a few years ago and when the pandemic happened, I was like, ‘OK girl, you have the time,’” Anifa Mvuemba, Hanifa’s founder, reveals in the latest episode of Bustle’s ‘Future of Fashion’ video series. “It took me back to that moment in my career where I was so passionate. A lot of it had to do with enjoying the process and not caring about what other people thought.”

Mvuemba says she opted for the 3D approach not only out of necessity due to the pandemic, but also because she wanted people to focus on her designs. Also important? Highlighting inclusivity when it came to the body types for the virtual models.

“One, I wanted everyone to just focus on the garments,” Mvuemba explains to Bustle Digital Group Vice President, Fashion Tiffany Reid. “And two, I wanted every single woman who was watching the show to actually see themselves in the clothing. It was really important for me to make sure that it looked exactly like the actual sample and actual product.”

The designer says that she makes apparel for the woman who is “so confident in herself.”

“She can walk into a room, not say a single word, and what she has on is speaking volumes,” Mvuemba shares. “I have curves, my friends got curves, we all have these assets. It was only right for me to highlight and portray that in the show.”

She challenges the industry to examine its own definition of inclusivity and what that looks like right now.

“I personally feel like the fashion industry isn’t as inclusive, not just talking about sizes,” she says. “It’s so hard coming into fashion as a Black woman, as an emerging designer that nobody knows. It’s always felt like a struggle. Something I’ve really stepped into is just being myself and doing what I wanted to do.”

Watch the ‘Future of Fashion’ episode above to hear more from Mvuemba on her innovative approach to design and the key lessons she learned about creating art in a time of crisis.

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