British Fashion Awards 2020 Winners

“Who is leading change in fashion?” asked the British Fashion Council ahead of the 2020 Fashion Awards, which premiered on Thursday Dec. 3 in a short film on the BFC’s Youtube channel — where 20 individuals and brands were recognized for leading positive change in the fashion industry during a very unpredictable year.

Instead of the usual focus on best designer, the BFC started fresh with four new categories of awardees: environment, people, community, and creativity. “From those who bravely faced this challenging year with pro-active responses to the global pandemic, showed leadership and creative resilience over the past year, to the ones who stood up against prejudice within the fashion industry and fight for change,” said the BFC in a press statement. Ahead, are the winners . . .

Community

Emergency Design Network
Launched by Phoebe English, Bethany Williams, Holly Fulton, and Cozette McCreery, “harnessed the power of London’s fashion community. Galvanizing industry experts to produce 50,000 surgical gowns and 10,000 sets of scrubs for British health workers.”

Michael Halpern
“During the Covid-19 lockdown, rather than stage a show for London Fashion Week, Michael paid tribute to the frontline workers. He captured eight women from across the public service sectors in film and portraits, reflecting on their work, sparking joy and hope.”

Chanel
“Chanel uses its influence to create positive change. Through the work of foundation Chanel, it is committed to improving the economic and social conditions of women worldwide. It has developed a racial justice fund to support grassroots organizations led by people of color.”

Kenneth Ize
“Dedicated to preserving African craft and heritage through a community of weavers, artisans, and design groups placing Nigerian cultural heritage on a global stage.”

A Sai
“Actively standing against injustice to make fashion inclusive and kind. A Sai Ta uses his voice to offer an end to discrimination against marginalized communities and committing profits to organizations that support the end of systemic discriminations and racism.”

People

Edward Enninful
“As editor of British Vogue, he is an agent of change, holding a mirror up to the industry.”

Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles of Black In Fashion Council
“In June 2020, Lindsay, editor of Teen Vogue, and Sandrine, PR executive, launched the Black In Fashion Council whose aim is to set a new foundation for diversity, inclusion, and accountability to the fashion industry.”

Samuel Ross
“A part of a new generation of menswear designers. His brand, A-Cold-Wall* has a big impact on the communities that he works with. His Black Lives Matter financial aid scheme pledges money to organizations and people on the front line. He gave thousands of dollars to businesses with Black owners across a diverse range of areas.”

Aurora James
“This year, Aurora James spearheaded a pioneering campaign calling on retailers to dedicate 15 percent of their shelf space to Black-owned brands. This, along with her community of communities and artisans through her brand Brother Vellies, makes her a trailblazer.”

Priya Ahluwalia
“A progressive-thinking leader and agent

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Here are the winners of the 2020 Fashion Awards

Updated story: 4/12/2020

The British Fashion Awards took place last night in a very different way than we’re used to.



Kim Jones, Riccardo Tisci posing for a photo: Honourees were awarded over four categories for this year's digital-only event.


© Getty Images
Honourees were awarded over four categories for this year’s digital-only event.

Instead of its usual big party and celebrity-studded ceremony at London’s Royal Albert Hall, the awards were presented by Priyanka Chopra Jones, Lewis Hamilon, Aja Barber, Maisie Williams and singer Rosalía in a short film, which was accessible to the public for the first time.

The British Fashion Council (BFC) awarded 20 accolades that honoured and celebrated those in the industry that have created positive change in fashion, stood up against prejudice, and proactively responded to the pandemic – across four categories of Community, Creativity, Environment and People.

Discover the 20 winners below:

Community

  • Asai
  • Chanel
  • Emergency Designer Network
  • Kenneth Ize
  • Michael Halpern

Creativity

  • Grace Wales Bonner
  • Jonathan Anderson
  • Kim Jones
  • Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons for Prada
  • Riccardo Tisci for Burberry

Environment

  • Anya Hindmarch
  • Christopher Raeburn
  • Gabriela Hearst
  • François-Henri Pinault for leading the G7 Fashion Pact
  • Stella McCartney

People

  • Aurora James
  • Edward Enninful
  • Lindsay People Wagner and Sandrine Charles for the Black in Fashion Council
  • Ahluwalia
  • Samuel Ross

Original story: 30/11/2020

The British Fashion Council has released a trailer for the 2020 Fashion Awards, which will be taking place this week in a new format as a result of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting restrictions placed on large gatherings in the UK. The annual event – which tends to take place in London in December and always draws in a big A-list crowd – will this year be a digital-only event.

The 2020 Fashion Awards will be held on Thursday 3 December and will “honour and celebrate the designers, brands, creatives and individuals who have created positive change within the fashion industry this year”, the BFC announced in a statement last month.

This year, there will be a focus on those who bravely and pro-actively dealt with the pandemic, who showed leadership and creative resilience and who stood up to prejudice within the fashion industry. The awards will likely celebrate and respond to efforts to encourage diversity within the fashion industry after a summer of Black Lives Matter protests which took place across the UK and around the world.

“The Fashion Awards recognises and celebrates innovation in fashion,” Priyanka Chopra Jonas, the new BFC Ambassador for positive change, says as she introduces the awards in the trailer, which you can watch below.

“What the past couple of months have shown us, is that the fashion industry is in need of a reset,” BFC CEO Caroline Rush said. “This is why this year, under unique circumstances, we felt that it was important to recognise the people and businesses who played a role in some of the most important and challenging issues of our generation and champion those who raised the bar in areas such as diversity, sustainability, and community.”

The award show, which is being sponsored by regular partner Swarovski, will honour 20 individuals

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The Fashion Award winners of 2020 share their hopes for the future of the fashion industry

Samuel Ross 

Founder of the Black Lives Matter Financial Aid Scheme, Ross pledged £10,000 to those on the frontline supporting the BLM movement and gave grants of £25,000 to Black-owned businesses.

“Next year we need less talk—more action and change.”

Priya Ahluwalia Photo: Courtesy of The Fashion Awards

Priya Ahluwalia 

A pioneer of sustainable fashion and telling the stories of those who make her clothes, Ahluwalia is an agent for change who uses her platform to raise awareness about the Black community.

“2020 has been such a turbulent year, the importance of community has been imperative to me both personally and professionally. The community I built between my peers through the height of the BLM protests is unbreakable and I was able to get through everyday because of it.”

Lindsay Peoples Wagner Photo: Courtesy of The Fashion Awards

Sandrine Charles Photo: Courtesy of The Fashion Awards

Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles 

Founders of the Black in Fashion Council—editors, models, stylists, creatives, and industry stakeholders who aim to bring diversity, inclusion, and accountability to the fashion industry.

“While this year has been incredibly tough, we want to make sure that people of colour are being supported and uplifted. The Black in Fashion Council community has meant so much to people who have been pleading with the industry for inclusivity, making people feel less alone and creating a lane for real hope and systemic change. And that means everything to us. We’ve made strides, but the work has only just begun.”

Aurora James Photo: Courtesy of The Fashion Awards

Aurora James 

James has brought change to the fashion industry through her campaign to promote Black-owned businesses, calling on retailers to dedicate 15% of their shelf space to Black-owned brands.

“I couldn’t have done any of my work this year without the strong friends and family who create my communities… We must carry this movement on whether it’s through hard policy work, corporate restructuring or even spending power, which creates economic equality for marginalised people and small businesses. The fashion industry has approached change with an optic lens for far too long. My goal with The 15% Pledge is to dig deeper.”

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First Women’s Prize for Playwriting shared by two winners

The inaugural Women’s Prize for Playwriting has been shared by two writers who were praised by judges for their ambition, craft and political urgency. The prize was awarded to You Bury Me by the pseudonymous playwright Ahlam, whose script explores romance, friendship and religion in post-Arab-spring Cairo, and Reasons You Should(n’t) Love Me by Amy Trigg, about a woman who was born with spina bifida and is navigating life and love.

Ellie Keel, a theatre producer and the prize’s founder, said the two plays were “very different but both enormously skilled and compelling pieces of work that I can’t wait for the public to get to see”.

The award was launched earlier this year by Keel with Charlotte Bennett and Katie Posner, joint artistic directors of the touring theatre company Paines Plough. It is open to any writer identifying as female, and aims to support and showcase established writers and emerging talent in Britain’s stage industry.

Ahlam and Trigg were awarded £12,000 each and their plays have been optioned to be co-produced by Paines Plough, Ellie Keel Productions and 45North.

You Bury Me will be Ahlam’s first full-length play to be produced and revolves around six Egyptian characters whose lives are intertwined in risky ways. “A lot of it is about Coptic Christianity and the constraints it puts on romantic relationships in particular,” said Keel.

“It’s a really ambitious and sprawling story,” said Bennett, “and looks at what it means to live in a police state effectively – what that means for you emotionally, politically and legally. It’s a really politically charged piece that’s told through brilliantly drawn characters, and it also opens up insight into Cairo and Egypt in a way I have not seen on stage before.”



Amy Trigg performing in Fusion, Sadler’s Wells, London, 2018. Photograph: Jane Hobson/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Amy Trigg performing in Fusion, Sadler’s Wells, London, 2018. Photograph: Jane Hobson/Rex/Shutterstock

Amy Trigg is a writer and actor who has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company. She was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. Her monologue is about a disabled young woman and how her romantic involvements affect her sense of self-worth. Posner felt it was funny and moving, with sparkling dialogue. She explained that the play was meant to be performed by an actor who uses a wheelchair. Trigg, she said, has advised theatre practitioners that “if you can’t find one, look a bit harder” and that it is a story that “urgently needs to be told in a successful way on stage”.

The prize received more than 1,100 submissions. Seventy scripts were selected for the longlist, which was whittled down to a shortlist of 35. This year’s judges, Indhu Rubasingham, Monica Dolan, Sarah Frankcom, Tanika Gupta, Ella Hickson, Kate Pakenham, Maxine Peake and the chair, Mel Kenyon, picked the winners from seven finalists.

Keel said many of the playwrights were grappling with urgent subject matter and telling powerful stories about today. While there were no unifying themes, there was a powerful sense of justice in many of the plays. “They seemed

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First Women’s Prize for Playwriting awarded to two winners | Theatre

The inaugural Women’s Prize for Playwriting has been awarded to two writers who were praised by judges for their ambition, craft and political urgency. The prize was given to You Bury Me by the pseudonymous playwright Ahlam, whose script explores romance, friendship and religion in post-Arab-spring Cairo, and Reasons You Should(n’t) Love Me by Amy Trigg, about a woman who was born with spina bifida and is navigating life and love.

Ellie Keel, a theatre producer and the prize’s founder, said the two plays were “very different but both enormously skilled and compelling pieces of work that I can’t wait for the public to get to see”.

The award was launched earlier this year by Keel with Charlotte Bennett and Katie Posner, joint artistic directors of the touring theatre company Paines Plough. It is open to any writer identifying as female, and aims to support and showcase established writers and emerging talent in Britain’s stage industry.

Ahlam and Trigg were awarded £12,000 each and their plays have been optioned to be co-produced by Paines Plough, Ellie Keel Productions and 45North.

You Bury Me will be Ahlam’s first full-length play to be produced and revolves around six Egyptian characters whose lives are intertwined in risky ways. “A lot of it is about Coptic Christianity and the constraints it puts on romantic relationships in particular,” said Keel.

“It’s a really ambitious and sprawling story,” said Bennett, “and looks at what it means to live in a police state effectively – what that means for you emotionally, politically and legally. It’s a really politically charged piece that’s told through brilliantly drawn characters, and it also opens up insight into Cairo and Egypt in a way I have not seen on stage before.”

Amy Trigg performing in Fusion, Sadler’s Wells, London, 2018.
Amy Trigg performing in Fusion, Sadler’s Wells, London, 2018. Photograph: Jane Hobson/Rex/Shutterstock

Amy Trigg is a writer and actor who has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company. She was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. Her monologue is about a disabled young woman and how her romantic involvements affect her sense of self-worth. Posner felt it was funny and moving, with sparkling dialogue. She explained that the play was meant to be performed by an actor who uses a wheelchair. Trigg, she said, has advised theatre practitioners that “if you can’t find one, look a bit harder” and that it is a story that “urgently needs to be told in a successful way on stage”.

The prize received more than 1,100 submissions. Seventy scripts were selected for the longlist, which was whittled down to a shortlist of 35. This year’s judges, Indhu Rubasingham, Monica Dolan, Sarah Frankcom, Tanika Gupta, Ella Hickson, Kate Pakenham, Maxine Peake and the chair, Mel Kenyon, picked the winners from seven finalists.

Keel said many of the playwrights were grappling with urgent subject matter and telling powerful stories about today. While there were no unifying themes, there was a powerful sense of justice in many of the plays. “They seemed to be about situations that

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3 under-the-radar winners amid a limp start to the holiday shopping season

Not every retailer — or consumer company that sells products into major retailers — has received a lump of coal in the kickoff to the crucial holiday shopping season.

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Make no mistake though, there has been a lot of coal handed out already to many players since Thanksgiving Day as consumers spend cautiously amid rising joblessness and avoid store crowds altogether during a resurgent COVID-19 pandemic. Online sales on Black Friday rose 21.6% year over year to a new record of $9 billion, according to data crunched by Adobe Analytics. But, the sales result fell far short of Adobe’s high-end estimate of $9.6 billion.

Online sales on Thanksgiving Day clocked in at $5.1 billion, up 21.5% from a year ago, but short of Adobe’s $6 billion forecast.

Underwhelming online sales numbers for Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday suggests sales at physical stores remain under severe strain as shoppers maintain a focus on their health.

Yahoo Finance saw the slow start to the shopping season firsthand in the streets of New York City on Black Friday. Crowds at the iconic Macy’s store in Herald Square were virtually non-existent for most of the day, something not typically seen on Black Friday but indicative of consumer behavior amidst the pandemic. The usually bustling Fifth Avenue — the mecca of luxury store shopping in the city — was anything but in early afternoon as tourism continues to be under wraps as people avoid travel.

A Best Buy store on Fifth Avenue had the most traffic of any store Yahoo Finance visited as people scooped up Apple Watches, work from home gear and smart home items. But even that seemingly solid traffic was far from the normal on a Black Friday.

“Our store capacity is capped at 150 people including staff, but we haven’t come close to hitting that,” a Best Buy employee at the store told Yahoo Finance.

Despite some early gloom, however, there do appear several winners so far in the holiday shopping race.

Pet stores are winning as Fido gets a new bone

Online sales of pet products surged 254% on Black Friday from a year ago, Adobe Analytics said. The number isn’t too much of a surprise as people have adopted pets at a record pace during the pandemic to provide some mental relief. About 20% of respondents to a July Nielsen survey said they adopted more dogs or cats between March and June. A year ago that number stood at less than 5%.

Now all those new furry family additions need a holiday gift.

Investors may want to keep an eye on online pet products retailer Chewy, which reports earnings on Dec. 8. Positive commentary on Chewy’s earnings call could be in the offing judging by Adobe’s Black Friday data and strong sales of pet

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PnP Clothing announces Gavin Rajah collab and Futurewear winners

Pick n Pay Clothing has launched its third limited-edition locally-produced collection, this time designed by the well-known Gavin Rajah. “Customers will be able to shop this incredible designer range at everyday, affordable prices,” says Hazel Pillay, general manager for Pick n Pay Clothing, commenting on how the collection is perfectly timed with the launch of Black Friday deals now in stores.


PnP Clothing x Rajah


A year ago, Pick n Pay Clothing and Gavin Rajah conceptualised the idea to launch a collaboration project to assist up-and-coming designers to launch a commercially-viable range. The project sought to entrench their brands in the local market, while also providing customers with access to the latest trends and attainable proudly South Africa designer collections.

Pillay says the project nearly hit a speedbump with the national shutdown, but instead, it reinforced the need to support local and accentuated customer demand for quality clothing at great prices. In August, PnP Clothing successfully launched a ladies range designed by Julia Buchanan, and a men’s range by Katekani Moreku in September. Both showcased the designers’ creative style and the ranges were quickly snapped up by customers.

The third collaboration collection – PnP Clothing x Rajah – has closely followed the latest fashion trend towards casualisation based on months of remote working, but, this wasn’t the original plan for the collection, explains Pillay. “Customer preferences changed during lockdown – they wanted comfortable clothes and many prioritised shopping for their kids. So we launched a completely new range for the whole family, including shorts, tops, dresses, swimwear, and accessories.”

PnP Clothing x Rajah


Rajah says the lockdown inspired him to create his ‘What the world needs now is love”’ collection which includes bold playful prints. “The collection celebrates life and the common thread of ‘love’ that binds us all together, something that we now need more than ever.”

He adds, “Despite current economic conditions, customers still want to be able to afford something that is beautifully made and designed. They want an element of escapism and clothing has the power to elevate or transform a person’s mood.”

The collection will also include a trendy Athleisure range, launching early December. “We reacted to customers’ outdoor lifestyles and the comfort they embraced in lockdown. We think customers will really enjoy the full range,” says Rajah.

Collaborating with local designers and suppliers over the past year has showcased the level of talent in the country and the opportunities these collabs offer to build local businesses and offer customers greater variety, says Pillay.

PnP Clothing x Rajah

Mentorship projects winners

To discover new talent for future collaborations, Pick n Pay Clothing launched Futurewear – a mentorship project for emerging local creatives, in association with Atelier Gavin Rajah. Nearly 200 applicants applied in a month and two winners were selected to create limited edition, exclusive designs for PnP Clothing in 2021.

Zarah Cassim, is a fine arts graduate currently practicing as an artist, with a very romantic, nostalgic view of the world. The other selected

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie voted Women’s prize ‘winner of winners’

Thirteen years after she won the Women’s prize for fiction, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel about the Biafran war, Half of a Yellow Sun, has been voted the “winner of winners” of the literary award in a public vote.

The one-off prize, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the award, was judged by members of the public, who were asked to name their favourite of the 25 winners. Adichie’s novel, which follows the lives of several characters caught up in the civil war in Nigeria in the late 1960s, beat titles including Zadie Smith’s On Beauty and Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin. More than 8,500 people voted, according to the prize.

Now a household name and international bestseller thanks to novels including Americanah and her essay and TED talk We Should All Be Feminists, Adichie was just 29 when she won the Women’s prize for her second novel in 2007. Then known as the Orange prize, that year’s contest pitted the Nigerian writer’s work against Booker winner Kiran Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss and Anne Tyler’s Digging to America. The chair of judges in 2007, Muriel Gray, called Half of a Yellow Sun “astonishing, not just in the skilful subject matter, but in the brilliance of its accessibility”.

The author, who is currently in Lagos, Nigeria, said she was “especially moved to be voted ‘winner of winners’ because this is the prize that first brought a wide readership to my work – and has also introduced me to the work of many talented writers.”



Kate Mosse who is smiling and looking at the camera: ‘Great books live beyond their time’ … Kate Mosse. Photograph: Rosdiana Ciaravolo/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
‘Great books live beyond their time’ … Kate Mosse. Photograph: Rosdiana Ciaravolo/Getty Images

Kate Mosse, who founded the Women’s prize prize in 1995 after the judges of the 1991 Booker failed to include a single woman author on their shortlist, said she was “thrilled” that Adichie had won an award that was intended to show that “great books live beyond their time”.

“One of the things that’s so fantastic about Chimamanda being the winner of winners is that a lot of younger readers are now coming to that novel, who probably didn’t read it when it came out. It’s felt like a really celebratory thing to be doing over this very strange year,” said Mosse.

Mosse has reread all 25 winners of the prize over lockdown, and described Adichie’s contender as “a book that speaks to anybody, whoever they are, wherever they come from, whatever their point of view is, and I think that there are not that many books which do that”.

Adichie’s novel tackles colonialism, ethnic allegiances, class, race and female empowerment. “But it’s beautifully told because you’re there rooting for characters, and in the end, that’s what history is. It’s about the real people who stood on that spot … It’s a really, really fine novel, and it was a great pleasure to reread it,” said Mosse.

Related: Women’s prize at 25: what it is like to win by Zadie Smith, Naomi Alderman and more

Adichie,

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A record number of Republican women ran for Congress. Here are the winners

The number of Republican women running for Congress this year reached a record, creating a path for additional representation on the House floor.

At least four non-incumbent GOP women candidates won congressional terms, according to election results analysis from McClatchy News. The winners include Yvette Herrell in New Mexico; Cynthia Lummis in Wyoming; Nancy Mace in South Carolina; and Maria Elvira Salazar in Florida, according to Associated Press projections.

While Lummis won handily in the traditionally red state of Wyoming, candidate Salazar pulled an upset in the Miami area. In coastal South Carolina, Mace’s win flipped a seat in a district the GOP lost two years ago.

The wins came in a year when 94 Republican women — including 11 incumbents — were vying for congressional seats nationwide. That’s a record high and nearly twice as many as the 52 women who ran on the GOP ticket in 2018, PBS News Hour and USA Today reported.

The newly elected Republican women are expected to join a Congress that after the midterms reached new records for non-white and female members. Some of those are Democrats who were just reelected, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

New Mexico on Tuesday became the first state to elect only non-white women to the House of Representatives, The Hill and other news outlets reported.

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The Women’s Health 2020 Fitness Award Winners Are Here

From Women’s Health

There’s nothing we love more at Women’s Health than a little friendly competition—even if it’s just with ourselves. And this year, for our annual Fitness Awards, we set the bar high: create the ultimate guide to the best exercise equipment to make your home gym feel sweet and complete. (Simple, right?)

Welp, after 12 months of testing and reviewing over a thousand different exercise machines, fitness tools, connected devices, activewear, gear, and virtual workout platforms, we feel truly confident that the 75 winners on this list will take your training up a notch (or several!). Please meet the next-gen of exercise equipment that’ll help you get #WHstrong…without leaving your house. (Peep the products featuring a lightning bolt logo for WH editors’ faves!) Suffice to say we are obsessed and know you will be too.

Jump to see each category:

Photo credit: Daniella Midenge

While you don’t ~need~ new sneakers, sports bras, or leggings, you’ll def want these for their cutting-edge upgrades.

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Photo credit: Daniella Midenge

Our editors hit the trails and streets hard this year with a li’l help from this short list of items.

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Photo credit: Daniella Midenge

These apps, online streaming platforms, and pocket-size devices are designed to put a virtual fit fam at your fingertips.

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Photo credit: Daniella Midenge

Behold! Our hot takes on the souped-up iterations of basic home gym equipment every woman should own.

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Photo credit: Daniella Midenge

Sure, the items in this category are a splurge, but the game-changing innovation that’s gone into them makes ’em worth every penny.

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This article originally appeared in the December 2020 issue of Women’s Health.

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